MovieChat Forums > The Wizard of Oz (1939) Discussion > Why is this crap so famous in US?

Why is this crap so famous in US?


This is an ok movie, I'm sure that back then its sfx were on par with Avatar (another just ok movie btw). But Americans decided to hold it as a classic for the ages for some reasons I can't quite fathom.

This is almost obscure outside of the US, something that will shock most Americans but that's a fact. Most people in the world know of the Wizard of Oz, as a name, that's about it.
No Dorothy, Toto, Tin Man etc. Nor very popular side icons like munchkins or witches or flying monkeys. All that is not popular knowledge anywhere else. This is not shown every year on tv or whatever, at least not since 1939 :-)

So why do you think Americans keep it as something so special in their tradition?

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Screw you!

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WHATS YOUR JAM....MR BEAN?,DAVID HASSELHOFF,EATING TURDS?

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I'm not familiar with the last one you mentioned.
Who shot this "Eating turds"? Your mother?

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Because.

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Ahah, that's probably the best answer possible to explain this cultural phenomenon:-)

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Because of the wonderful things he does dodododoo

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:D

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Because because because becaaaaaaaause

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I believe it had a lot to do with the annual television broadcasts. Its 1939 original theatrical run was fairly successful, but it actually did not show a profit until the 1949 re-release. In the 1950s it was shown on network television, and a whole new audience became acquainted with the film.

The annual airings became very popular, and were much anticipated to the point where The Wizard of Oz became a must-see event. The fact that it could be seen only once a year gave the occasion an almost holiday flavor. It was special part of childhood for many, and it became ingrained in the pop culture.

With the advent of home video, the annual presentations began to lose their magic, and were eventually dropped. After 1980 kids could watch the movie anytime on VHS. But the memories of those yearly special events lived on. I have spoken with many adults who have fond memories of those early days when the family made popcorn and gathered in front of the TV for an evening of fantasy.

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Yep, that's a great explaination, it became a tradition like that.
Thanks I didn't know that.

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It's also one of the finest films ever made. Hate to break it to you.

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I rate it ok, I'm sure it has huge historical significance for its sfx and mise en scene.
By today standards is ok, nothing spectacular.

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It's unfair to judge it by today's standards, especially since it most likely played a big part in the evolution of FX (the tornado scene still gives me the chills and is a hundred times more menacing than the CG ones we have now). I agree with Jonathan's post above. It was a yearly tradition when we were kids (along with Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory) that gave us fantasy worlds to look forward to. Nowadays fantasy films are the norm but not in the 70s. I've outgrown Oz and Chitty but can see why they are held in such high regard.

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Exactly. Forget about today when you watch classic films.

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Like IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946) as well.

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In recent years the film has had annuals returns to TV..and it seems a lot of people still cannot wait, even if it's a DVDE (you know, pout it in, I cannot wait, let's get popcorn going.. same with streaming. Hell, even to go to a movie I can';t do that everyday..I missed the annual theatre showing this year)

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Speak for yourself. Im Australian, grew up with this movie on Beta. I'd go out on a limb and say this is a classic film in every English speaking country.

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Yes, I meant outside of US colonies, dude.

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WEL...THEN WHO THE [email protected]#K CARES...I MEAN SERIOUSLY...

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That's the other 6.5 billion people on the planet, I guess they care, seriously.
Or in this case, don't care.

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YEAH...THEY DONT COUNT...IF THEY SAY DIFFERENTLY WE WILL WAR THEIR ASSES INTO EXTINCTION.

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Australia is not U.S. colony. Never was... outside of the native Aboriginal peoples, Australia was founded as a British penal colony.

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PYGMIES AND RAPISTS...NEED MORE BE SAID?

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Australia is a US economical and cultural colony.
Or to be more precise, it's a colony of a US colony.

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UK:
hey! we're the imperialist country stealing invaders around here!
you're lucky we gave you yours back , we were getting tired of you anyway!

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Ahaha! Precisely!

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This is the most ridiculous comment I've ever read on the internet.

Australia WAS a colony of the UK, just as America was. You might get a hint of this if you look at the prominence of the Union Jack on the Australian flag.

We're not as influenced by the US as you might think. And since 2016, we're happy to keep our distance.

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[deleted]

lol at US colony. Just say English-speaking country, or read a history book before you comment.

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Alot of people think the wizard of Oz was like the first colored film ever because of the beginning being in black and white and then it turning into color when Dorothy steps foot into Oz. This is not the case though. But I'm sure it's a huge reason it resonates with so many..the film is kinda a Urban Legend in that sense.

Besides that there is other reasons why. Like the LGBTQ community really latching on to the movie. I think because of the "over the rainbow song"..the gay community has for sure helped keep the movie alive.

Also to get back to urban legends people think there is a scene where an actor hung himself on set and it made it into the movie..a munchkin. Naturally even non fans of the movie will watch it out of morbid curiosity.

Also the network television stations keep it alive because they play it so often on TV. In addition to it playing every Christmas season now and it's not even a Christmas movie... people associate the movie with Christmas because it's ALWAYS played at Christmas time on TV. It's the same for Charlie and the chocolate factory. In addition to their Christmas runs, they also are played every few months on TV as well. I remember being 12 and wanting to watch it at my friend's house in the 90s...I think Cable has brainwashed us to want to watch it...and for that it's become like one of my favorite movies ever... Charlie and the chocolate factory as well.

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YOU SURE YOU ARENT 12 NOW?....I MEAN...JESUS CHRIST.

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Pretty sure.

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Yes I agree that the tv programming has a lot to do with its popularity.
But why is it limited to US culture?
There's tv in other places too, yet they never care to program this one.
I like the gay rainbow thing, it is quite a gay movie if you think about it it's its most interesting feature. The Lion is totally out there, it's fabolous!

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It's just not the wizard of Oz Americans are fixated on tho. They make just as big a deal over Gone With The Wind...and the Rocky movies...um let's see..how about the movie A Christmas Story. Is that big in your country? Here it's played for 24hours every Christmas Eve starting at 5pm until 6pm on Christmas day. On two cable channels.

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The Rocky movies are internationally famous and quite popular too.
Gone with the wind is the most watched movies ever, all over the planet.
A Christmas Story is not internationally known nor respected, but I can see how it would fit in a national tradition of Christmas movies in America.
I mean, it's part of the tradition because it deals with that time of the year, not because it's just part of the national culture like the WOZ.

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We had a Japanese exchange student come to our house. She was so excited to watch the Wizard of Oz with us. "Everybody loves it" were her exact words.

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Who knows? I mean why do Germans enjoy killing Jews and involving feces in sexual situations? Why do Romanians bite people on the neck all the time? Heck, why are Indians (from India) always eating monkey brains and tearing out people’s still beating hearts? Every country has its idiosyncrasies, and one shouldn’t look down on them for it.

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