MovieChat Forums > Ready Player One (2018) Discussion > Could the OASIS become a reality?

Could the OASIS become a reality?


Could the OASIS exist in real life? We have virtual reality headsets - the strangely named Oculus Rift is one of the current products on the market, and online gaming is well established, but could the OASIS - a vast virtual world where you can do anything/be anyone - become possible? And imagine if it were possible, the social ramifications could be huge.

If you think about the power of social media, online gaming, streaming tv/films etc - people are already addicted to their cell phones, imagine what the OASIS would do to so some people. They'd never meet anyone in real life! You could spend your entire life in a virtual world.

One major downside to the potential of virtual reality is the health side-effects. Headaches, severe eyestrain are a common side-effect from using VR. I think this is the biggest obstacle to overcome. No-one mentioned headaches in Ready Player One! "Hi, my name is Wade. I have excruciating headaches all the time because I live in the OASIS."

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People are already living this way... Drunk on video games and shitty comicbook movies... Hiding away from the real world and real human connection...

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Plot twist: The "real" world isn't real either. We've been stuck inside a simulation for thousands, potentially even millions of years, forced to have our memories wiped and be reincarnated over and over and over ad infinitum.

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To actually FEEL and SENSE like you’re inside a VR world (another world period) and be free to roam around and do anything as opposed to simply view images through a headset? That’s the kind of VR I’ve been waiting for since... forever. I have read some articles regarding this topic and more than few of them express the same sentiment: this could very well become a reality someday. Note—there are some obstacles to overcome, so although it is a possibility, it’s not easy to see something as advanced as the OASIS happening anytime soon. It might take decades but who knows.

I know I wouldn’t mind spending all my time in the OASIS these days, headaches notwithstanding. I’m all for accepting the real world but this level of escapism would be an extraordinary thing to experience.

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Have you tried an Oculus? Skyrim VR?

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I have tried an Oculus. Granted it was only once, but I will say it was the best VR experience I’ve ever had. And while I hesitate to say it gives the Oasis a run for its money, it does show how much progress has been made.

Skyrim VR? Can’t say that I have. Yet.

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There would have to be a full body suit or a device that could control nerve perception in order to make it feel real.

Visual and audio isn't enough.

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Precisely. And accomplishing something like this isn’t going to be uncomplicated, to say the least. It’s gonna take a while.

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Complicated? Yes

Gonna take a while? Perhaps not

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There’s already remote controlled virtual reality sexual devices.

One of them involves putting your schlong in a sleeve and a women halfway around the world can “relieve” you remotely.

All it would take is for that tech to include a full body version of such a sleeve.

But for pain sensation in a war zone?

I would think the liability factor would be rather high.

Especially if some wimp died from some form of induced virtual world “pain”.

They’ll most likely experiment with virtual cities the size of London first.

They already do that on TWINITY.



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It's 2018 give it to 2025 like in the show by then ready player one should be a reality maybe even better

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mindlash (device that could alternate brainwaves to simulate any effects necessary and take commands by circumventing the need for body movement) would be the only real world to create something like a real virtual world. The device should basically work like a dream, where you would "fall asleep" but inside the virtual world instead of a dream and your body engages the muscle relaxation like in sleep. For fictional examples see: Caprica, Sword Art Online, Surrogates.

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Im severely underimpressed by current state of "VR" if you can call it that. Its just 3d visuals that replaces your entire field of view. You still need control devices, you still have no feedback, you got loads of problems with replicating motions, you got horrible performance because of processing power requirements. Its nowhere near ready to be called VR. In the 2040s like this movie - maybe.

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Spoken like a person who's never tried it (go ahead, lie), and is generally ignorant of how far it has come.

VR in its current consumable form didn't exist at all just 3 years ago, and now there's tons of highly interactive and immersive games available, not to mention its many other uses and even new artforms being developed (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWNo1H2tVhg - drawn in Oculus Quill). It's an emerging and evolving field that is amazing to behold just as it stands right now, but there's many exciting new features on the horizon:

https://youtu.be/kxtt_RJp_QA?t=100
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLjs_PtVyKM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PH9xwkTOBEI
(you can already make many hand motions with Oculus Touch - https://youtu.be/ggZvKL3pArc?t=103 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDeco6_S77c)

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I have tried the vive for around 2 hours. Whether you believe me or not doesnt matter.

You are right that it did not exist 3 years ago, but that is not proof of it achieving virtual reality, only in it achieving what is currently available. It doe have some (i wouldnt call it tons) of games available, but itsu nderstnadable that it will pick up as adoption rate picks up. that isnt really the issue. the issue, as i pointed out, is a technological one. It is simply not hardware we need to call it actual VR yet.

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I recently tried VR, and two things come to mind:

(1) the vertigo I felt at the top of a building was real - it was just a feeling, but it was "real"

(2) after wearing the headset 30 minutes straight, the real world seemed "fake" for a few seconds afterwards

That's just today. The tech will only become more convincing with time

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That’s wild.

I’m for sure looking forward to seeing what the future holds for VR.

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recroom vr is the early version of oasis.

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It already is a reality

see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hikikomori

It will only increase as the abilities to simulate continue exeeding that of real world input. We already have mental disorders being recognized caused by things like instagram skewing peoples perception of reality to the point of depression and suicide.

>imagine what the OASIS would do to so some people. They'd never meet anyone in real life! You could spend your entire life in a virtual world.

Wonderful, isnt it!

>One major downside to the potential of virtual reality is the health side-effects.

The major downside of virtual reality is that it is not virtual reality. Its just 3d screen that takes over your entire field of vision. When we have mindlash technology, then you should expect societal collapse. Or rather i think its likely we will see society shift to something from Surrogates (2009).

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Getting the basics of a tactile system is probably the biggest roadblock. If I had to guess, I'd say it'll take about ten years to get the basic tactile response needed for mid-ranged immersion. By then, chances are something similar to a small version of the Oasis will already be in production even with no tactile-touch system. You know there are going to be millions interested in joining that community even if they couldn't physically touch anything. But once they can, humanity will be living more inside VR (those who can afford it) than outside.

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The Oasis, and later the MATRIX, are where humans END. Our robots will visit the cosmos and we'll become the programs. We're living in the end of days. Make no mistake.

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