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What was the point of the Night's Watch at the end?


In series 8 the Wight army and Night King were wiped out, so why even have the need for a Night's Watch? The wildlings were allies.

Jon rides off above the ''wall'' in the watch at the end? To watch what, exactly? Pointless

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It's another reason why the ending was so poorly done. I personally feel they shouldn't have killed the Night King/WW off completely, but seeing as they did they could have at least addressed the Night's Watch and what purpose it serves now, if they're going to make out sending Jon there is a punishment.

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It's not so much the ending at the Night Watch and Jon going back there, but the entire premise for the Wall and the Night King and the entire ambiguity of GRRM's cosmology. It has no real back story unlike Tolkien's cosmology of Arda and the Ainu, Elves, Men, and other creatures.

GRRM basically took a bestiary of Dungeons & Dragons tropes and sprinkled them throughout his world building cultures, then to show how lazy he really was used English History by mirroring historic events. Furthermore, instead of being creative with his geography he instead took the British Isles and flipped them upside down and on top of each other. Yes, Tolkien also used continental Europe and its ancient mythologies as inspiration, but he didn't literally borrow from specific cultures and then changed the nomenclature of places, names, and events to protect the innocent.

Nobody should be surprised that he hasn't finished his books yet either. He has nothing left to say and he knows, but won't admit it. If he did, he'd be half as prolific as Stephen King who can shell out books faster than most men can their bowel movements.

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I wasted my time with this stupid fucking show. I realise now that all it had was shock value, with the endless gore and sex scenes, violence and bad language. The rest was all politicking and boring shit.

GRRM is a HACK, and Dumb and Dumber are no better. The only problem is, I now have two seasons of GoT on my Google Films and TV collection, and I can't DELETE the damn things because of Google's policy! I really, REALLY want to.

At least Season 8 is so bad and trashes the rest of the show so much, that you can laugh at its cringeworthy badness.

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Actually Dune is worse: a true hodge-podge of cultures with tons of pseudo-mysticism. And when the books got really popular and they started talking movie, suddenly Frank Herbert recanted on his old interview that the point of the series was to show that absolute power corrupts.

Don't forget that Tolkien rode on a lot of old legends about dwarves (miners in Snow White, etc.) and elves. Saying he created backstory is like saying True Blood did it with werewolves and vampires.

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I never said Tolkien didn't borrow pre-existing folklore. What he didn't do was make everything allegorical like trying to retell The Great War but using a Medieval timeline and using pre-Christian European mythology.

Tolkien actually did create an entire backstory and did so thru multiple drafts and cultures (the elves were originally gnomes in his first versions). Read the Silmarillion again and you'll find out the cosmological origins of pretty much all supernatural forces present in The Lord of the Rings. The Elves had a hierarchy of cultures and kingdoms and the world of Men were molded by both Elves and Ainur, which led to the developments we see as prehistory to the War of the Ring.

I was merely pointing out that GRRM had no real back story and instead blends English historical moments with fantasy tropes. He tries to disguise this by claiming that he's not into fantasy tropes but the "gray area" of human nature. What a load of crap. If I want that I'd rather read a documentary novelization of English History. Just because he inserts mythical fantasy tropes in the back ground doesn't elevate his world anywhere near Tolkien's Arda.

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I guess as a place to still get rid of criminals and the unwanted?
To still watch for White Walkers? The Night King has been defeated before so I suppose he could eventually come back again?

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Every one forgets that this isn't the first time the Night King was defeated.

He was defeated a thousand years before during the previous longest night. After that war was when the wall was built.

And while yes we are at peace with the Wildlings, that alliance is fragile at best. It basically hinges on the friendship of Jon and Tormund. It would take a lot to erase the tension of a thousand years of distrust and hostility, and once both those guys are gone, it won't take much for everyone to fall back into it.

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He was defeated but was he actually killed off like in series 8? It gave the impression to me he was finally killed once and for all. The Children of the Forest created him and they're all killed off too. I don't see how he or the WW are supposed to come back from this.

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Good points

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I believe the Night's Watch at the end was just a ruse. Dany's followers demanded some sort of justice, so to appease them, John was sentenced to the Night's Watch. As I stated however, this was a bit of a ruse to allow John to go free and live in the North, which is what he wanted.

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Honestly, that's the only logical explanation, because as far as anyone knows there's nothing to do there but to keep the Wildlings north of the Wall, and that can't actually be done because a good chunk of the Wall fell down and can't be rebuilt... and all the surviving wildlings are south of the Wall anyway. Because no, we may have been told that the Night's King has risen before and will rise again, but there's no indication that anyone in Westeros knows that.

The Night's Watch as we knew it was killed off over the course of the series, and we haven't seen them set up a new organization was set up and elect a new Lord Commander. As far as we know, they just sent Jon there to get him out of the way, and for all I knew he spent the winter eating up the stores in an otherwise deserted Wall castle, and maybe invited some of his Wildlings pals to join him. And they all went back to the far North when spring came, because that's what they wanted to do.

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That's the reason and they say it in plain words in the show. They laugh at Greyworm for it.

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True... Greyworm got the "FU" treatment at the end...

Shut up and do whats been decreed.

But then... Greyworm swore allegiance to his Queen, who commanded the dragons (of which there are now one)….

Drogon let Jon live.... seeing him as the last of the Targaryens?
He probably recognized, he couldn't have killed Jon with fire... only violence... Jon killed his Queen, therefor the new leader of the family (think of it in animal terms)?

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Agree with atomicx. It was obviously politics. It looked to me like Jon was at least ignoring the outmoded vow of chastity, walking beyond the wall with a group to start a new community (and find a third lover).

Greyworm kinda got the middle finger, but the self-appointed committee only laughed at Tarly -- for suggesting they try something novel, like asking the governed whom they want as a leader.

I also agree Night King is dead forever. The writer is already old enough that there were worries he'd die before finishing the books, and several movie reporter sites said he had outlined the end of the story to the director/producer a couple years ago.

I don't see evidence that the Children of the Forest are gone.

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They did at Greyworm, just not out loud. They said something like "he doesn't know there's no Night's Watch anymore" with a smile.

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I really cant see Greyworm doing anything but settling his men in their new home, and heading North to kill Jon Snow.

What has he got to lose, and who's gonna stop him from avenging his dragon queen? Not the government of Westeros, that's for damn sure

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It doesn't bother or surprise me that Jon ends up back at Wall. Like Tormund says, he has the real north in him, and it's where he feels most at home. (It's kind of like in Star Trek IV, when they have to punish Kirk for everything he did in III, but he did just help save the world, so they demoted him to be a captain of a starship, which is the only thing he ever wanted to do, anyway.) I think the Free Folk were going back north to return to their original homes beyond the Wall now that the AOTD was destroyed, and Jon was going with them (maybe to live permanently or maybe just to accompany them so he knew where they were).

BUT: When Jon leaves King's Landing at the end, he's accompanied by two men in black. I'm assuming they're men from the Shadow Tower, since they're not anyone we recognize (so probably not from Castle Black), and who knows how many people survived Eastwatch.

But, they're in black. Which means they're probably official members of the Watch. So why, when Jon returns to Castle Black, are the Free Folk the only people there? Why is Tormund the apparent dude in charge when there are at least two other men who have been officially manning the Wall for longer? Why not bring the guy in charge at the ST in and make him the leader at Castle Black?

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I just assumed they were banishing him some place that was barren and had no people, so the Wall would work to serve out his punishment.

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