MovieChat Forums > The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989) Discussion > Albert Spica, the most odious film chara...

Albert Spica, the most odious film character ever.


I have yet to come across another character who fills me with such a sense of loathing and revulsion. A fantastic performance by Michael Gambon.

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I totally agree! I'm watching this for the first time right now as I type this. He is a total sociopath and I am disgusted watching this and his his actions. Hard to believe this is the same man who played loveable old Dumbledore. There is nothing loveable about Albert Spica!

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Hannible Lecter!

or

Dennis Hopper's character in Blue Velvet!


Its that man again!!

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While you wouldn't immediately think so, what about Judge Elihu Smails from Caddyshack? I know that's a commedy, but if there's a list, he has to be on it.

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Don Logan, in Sexy Beast played by Ben Kingsley....To me they are neck in neck with photo finish at the wire lol~!

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I suspect that Don Logan is his younger brother, farmed out to Teddy Bass now that Albert has got ideas above his station. ;O)

Marlon, Claudia and Dimby the cats 1989-2005, 2007 and 2010.

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I tend to agree.

Love as much as you breathe

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Totally agree! Also the Libertines from Salò and Helmut Berger's character in The Damned.

I am driver. I go left, I go right, I go straight ahead - that's it.

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[deleted]

I was so like
is that Dumbledore
I'd thought he was a gay
so this is like cover up
or what?
he was like so so randy
with like Helen
or what ever




O & as 2 the thread 4 most ever
2 me
when it comes to odious
anything Tommy Cruise has ever done
which I guess is why I luv him so so much
so sooooo dreamy
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


What it is, is, what is, is. Is what it is.

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I agree. Also, the other suggestions on this thread are pathetic. This guy wins.

However, the king in "The King's Whore" comes really close. Too bad nobody can see that movie because it, too, is out of print.

-ClintJCL
http://clintjcl.wordpress.com/category/reviews/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/clintjcl

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When I saw this film, I thought about Blue Velvet and Dennis Hopper's character Frank Booth. Albert and Frank are like cousines. I think Frank is more disturbing though.

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same here (Hopper in Blue Velvet) .
Thing with Spica is, not only despicably evil but cheap... why I don't agree with Hannibal Lecter being in the same list... there was nothing cheap about most pf the villains named in the thread, t least not to the extent of Spica.

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No the blond boy who was wailing all the time with his horrible, horrible voice, was much worse. He literally makes the moviefillum unwatchable cuz there´s really not much point in bearing with it when you gotta have it on mute half the time, anyway. Plus, of course, the film´s relentlessly, overbearingly esoteric as well; some Very Self Conscious High Art going on right there.


"facts are stupid things" - Ronald Reagan

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I didn't mind the castrato kid. His voice was definitely off-putting at first, but his pitch was kind of impressive, and the angelic wailing ultimately complemented Michael Nyman's beautiful, ethereally mournful score.

I also didn't think the film was esoteric in the least. I normally have a problem with Greenaway's hollow intellectual pomposity and self-conscious artiness, but didn't really notice it here - perhaps because I found the basic plot surprisingly accessible and gripping right from the start. It's a very tight and focused script, largely free of his trademark inscrutability and quasi-literary trifling, yet it still contains several hidden layers if one chooses to look for them.

More importantly, there's genuine, relatable emotion here. It's not dramatically dry like most of his other movies. It's a film primarily defined by its righteous, burning anger - alleviated only by moments of quietly profound sadness. The painterly shot compositions, colour coding, and arty set design added a wonderfully surreal flavour to the proceedings, but in no way detracted from the searing emotional core.

Whatever the reason, the film really got to me. I think it's a stunning accomplishment and certainly one of my all-time favourites (no. 2 on my profile top 50!). Conversely, I think Ebert's review is absolutely spot-on in this case.





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