MovieChat Forums > Planet of the Apes Discussion > Burke and Virdon look like the Starsky a...

Burke and Virdon look like the Starsky and Hutch of out of space.


But maybe it was about that time.

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Indeed the comparison is apt.

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Actually if anything, Starsky and Hutch copied The Planet of the Apes. TPOA debuted in September of 1974 and the Starsky and Hutch pilot didn't air until April of 1975.

It's funny, Mego put out a line of Starsky and Hutch action figures as well as an extensive line of TPOA action figures. They also put out a line of Star Trek action figures. They were all about the same size and measurement so you could mix different characters into different situations. We would have Burke and Virdon be criminals in a Starsky and Hutch episode. I would put the red Star Trek shirt on Burke and have him be on a security detail. We would make Starsky a human in a POTA scenario etc.

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Urko was no Huggy Bear.

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by Fletcherj119 » Urko was no Huggy Bear.

No, but Galen sounded at lot like Huggy Bear. At least in Portuguese. I think the same actor dubbed both characters, back when I watched dubbed TV shows and movies.

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Interesting.

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by Fletcherj119 » Interesting.

There was a very limited number of voice actor who worked in subbing, so it was not unusual for different foreign actors being dubbed by the same Brazilian dubber. I remember the same guy usually dubbed Rock Hudson, David Soul and Leonard Nimoy's Spock, all heroic types. I also remember that Captain Kirk had at least three voices in different parts of the show (and others during the movies, which came much later), and the acting of each voice actor gave the live action actor quite a different meaning. One Kirk was gentler, another, more decisive, and when he got older, another sounded more seasoned.

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Like the Star Trek cartoon from the '70s - actors would voice more than one character, so the producers wouldn't have to pay additional voice actors.

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by Fletcherj119 » Like the Star Trek cartoon from the '70s - actors would voice more than one character, so the producers wouldn't have to pay additional voice actors.

Yeah, but those voice actors played different characters, but not on the same show or movie. I remember the Captain Jean-Luc Picard in season 1 Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) (Patrick Stewart) and Captain Nathan Bridger in SeaQuest DSV (1993) (Roy Scheider) had the same voice and accent, but that's the only character the voice actor played in each show. Later, Picard's voice changed and the same new actor dubbed Kevin Sorbo in Hercules: The Legendary Journeys (1995), which I found very, very strange.

Once Jonathan Harris came to Brazil and complimented actor Borges de Barros for his magnificent work he did dubbing the good old Dr. Zachary Smith.

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There must've been a reason they used the same actor for all that voice work. It does seem odd though.

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by Fletcherj119 » There must've been a reason they used the same actor for all that voice work. It does seem odd though.

From the 1950s to the 1980s, voice actors used in dubbing were expert voice actors, like FM radio presenters or audio book narrators, usually with no recognizable regional accent. As a result, there weren't too many actors qualified to do that kind of work, and they never got the prestige telenovela actors got, almost always staying in anonymity. (For instance, in POTA the show, I think only Naughton has that quality. Harper sounds like a regular guy talking. McDowell and Lenard do amazing voice acting, but there's nothing particularly special about the voices themselves.)

As a result, the final product was interesting to listen to, but the dialogue sounded artificial. That changed, and now the dubbers are regular actors even with regional accents. (I hate dubbers from Rio de Janeiro, by the way, as they sound too local).

Dubbing had become a lost art in the 2000s decade, with the popularization of cable TV and far too many American shows among the high middle class. But after 2010, low-income classes started having access to cable TV as well, and people with low academic education don't speak foreign languages and don't want to be wasting time with subtitles (even when they feel comfortable reading them, which is not always). So now, the default audio track for most shows is in Portuguese, and you have to press the SAP key on your remote to listen to the original soundtrack, which I always do.

In the 1990s there was a hilarious TV comedy show (Casseta & Planeta Urgente (1992)) with a skit about two American TV cops, Fwcker and Swcker (if you know what I mean, and these are not swear words considering the context, please), who fought crime in the violent reality of Brazil using American TV cop techniques. They were extremely naive, like Laurel and hardy. Of course they always failed. And spoke Portuguese with perfect dubbed voices. They had some nice catch phrases, usually a sanitized version of swear words, like "Move your fat behind from here" or "You son of a mundane woman," because that's all what the censorship of the 1960s would allow. Once they met a guy in a prison, and the prisoner says.

"I'm an American. I'm in the wrong place. Get me out of here."
"Yeah, we know that. We recognized the dubbing. Nice voice they gave you, by the way."

Anyway, there will always be a larger number of foreign actors doing TV shows and movies, than Brazilian actors doing the dubbing. And a voice actor has to do many, many characters if he is to work regularly and survive.

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I do remember Mark Lenard doing some radio announcing work on car commercials back in the '90s.

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Yeah, he was the national spokesman for Saab during the 80's-early 90's. I think he mostly did the radio commercials for Saab. I couldn't help thinking how odd it was that Urko was selling cars whenever I heard his voice on one of those advertisements.

[url][/urlhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbaD6UgUftw

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by JohnQ1127 » Yeah, he was the national spokesman for Saab during the 80's-early 90's. I think he mostly did the radio commercials for Saab. I couldn't help thinking how odd it was that Urko was selling cars whenever I heard his voice on one of those advertisements.

Was Lenard already famous back then? Because it doesn't count (at least that's not what I meant) if the actor is famous and they are using his star power. The real radio presenter I mean is usually mostly unknown, at least his face is. But he has a soothing, melodious voice and basically does only that: narrating. Like Jim Dale, the Narrator in Pushing Daisies. he is known for the narration of Harry Potter audio books. Or Don LaFontaine narrating movie trailers. I think James Naughton has that quality.

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No, Lenard wasn't famous. Star Trek fans new him as Spock's father and fans of the short lived show "Here Comes the Brides" knew him as Aaron Stempel. A few younger fans knew him as Urko from TPOA.

He had a great voice to do voiceover work for commercials. I think he did Saab for 10 years.


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He was Sarek on some of the Star Trek movies. He was sort of famous.

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He was known among Star Trek fans and some sic-fi fans but he wasn't known in the mainstream.

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All they needed was a 1974 Gran Torino.

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The best they could've done was a maroon and white palomino.

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