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NorrinRad (2706)


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Why Chadwick Boseman is named Stormin' Norman. Dancing at the Apocalypse Now club. Wait a minute?!!! Isn't there still a large portion (~25%) of the treasure missing?! Under Appreciated Enjoyed the banter between the Bloods (Jethro Bodine) Each Episode is building quite nicely Not de-aging the actors made Boseman look even younger than his actual age. RT: 92% Critics (158) versus 61% Audience (468) now 93% (196) vs 60% (848) Boseman as Squad Leader 'Stormin Norman' is played as mythic.. Fun Fact: Blood 👨🏿 isn't a "Gang" thing. Just a PSA View all posts >


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If Marvel ever gets around to a Kree v Skrull War or some other cosmic adventure I would expect Captain Marvel. Also a Fantastic Four cameo would be outstanding! Sounds like she is collab'ing with like minds. That was very entertaining to read and I have nothing to add except, "Carry on"!😎 Both. <blockquote>[–] brux (5768) 33 minutes ago > I decided to go for the Homerun when you attempted to bunt and struck out. No offense intended. OK, I don't even understand what that is supposed to mean. <b>> The state of Wisconsin is quite famous for having cities named after African-Americans: Kenosha, Racine, Waukesha, Mequon, etc.</b></blockquote>Brux, Brux, Brux that is a stale joke, a gag, a wisecrack that has been used by many dated comedians. 🤦‍♂️ Racine is NOT named after any African-Americans. Those city names just happen to SOUND like they would be the names of children that some black mother would use for her offspring. Thus the basis of a JOKE. 😂<blockquote>What's up with you NorrinRad? I thought you wanted to have a discussion but you are throwing out a lot of chaff to confuse things ... are you trolling?</blockquote>You MUST be kidding??!!!I provide for you some solid information to the why and the when for names of the Bloods. I provide for you some additional insights into common names used during that era along with some background as to why Cassisus Clay, Malcom X, the Black Panther Party would not have been an impetus for then current era Blacks in naming their children and you question if I am trolling you? Sigh....😎<blockquote>The point was, and I don't know, but in Viet Nam did most of the black soldiers who got shipped over there have white normative names or African-American or Black-Muslim influenced names, and what is the likelihood that all these black soldiers in Da 5 Bloods would have such average names?</blockquote>Let's take a cursory sample of the names of the prominent Black actors that you may have (or may have not heard of) that are in the age range who could have served in the Vietnam War: James Earl Jones Samuel L. Jackson Morgan Freeman Bill Cosby Sidney Poitier Jim Brown James Brown Ben Vereen Fred (The Hammer) Williamson Richard Roundtree Billy Dee Williams Danny Glover Louis Gossett Charles Dutton Muslim or Arabic sounding names of African Americans for that era wasn't a "Thing" yet. The Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power movement of the late 60's and early seventies sparked a moved from "Conformity" towards "Individuality" as the identity of Blacks/Negroes/African-American became transformative for ADOS. That trend didn't really pick up until well after the Vietnam War. There are plenty of sites that provide stats on name usage for people through the years. The likelihood of all of the Bloods having "Normal" names? Maybe 99.9999%? Brux..You're on a board for a movie about Vietnam and you wanted to segue to possibly discuss issues with names for African-Americans. You yourself said<blockquote>[–] brux (5768) 15 hours ago I was trying to poke a little fun at the names a lot of African Americans come up with for their kids. On the one hand it is kind of cool to have a unique name, but on the other hand they can be a negative. Studies have shown that African American names on resumes are treated with prejudice. Also I once to had some business to transact with the DMV and the lady's name was Latrina. I thought how sad it was that this nice lady who helped me out so competently had parents that would give her a name like that.</blockquote>You even shared your own "personal" experience. I recognized the context and provided for you some timeframes and reasons why the names of the Bloods including their squad leader were quite normal given the era. You brought up the following:<blockquote>I have to wonder if Spike Lee gave any thought to the names of the men here, or stayed away from any "ethnic" African American names deliberately?</blockquote>To which I replied:<blockquote>The whole rejection of slave-master names wasn't that popular among mainstream African-Americans in the 50's and 60's when these Bloods were born. Cassius Clay became Ali around 1961 and it was NOT a move that was celebrated by the majority of Blacks/African Americans as Muslims and Islam were not that widely accepted and or practiced. The Black Panther Party wasn't formed until 1966 and that was well past the birth of the Bloods.</blockquote>I even provided for all the origin of the names of all of the Bloods and how they were quite normal, again given the era/times. If you go one step further the actors playing those roles all have "traditional" sounding Westernized Anglo-Saxon names. 😂 Delroy Lindo is the exception as he was born in London of Jamaican parents. The only point being their real names (Isiah, Norm, Jonathan, Clarke) pretty much represent the times they were born in also. So no, Spike didn't make a decision to eschew "ethnic" names because it pretty much would have been way out of the <b>norm</b> for that character. <i>(Norm? Get it? Another play on words.)</i> The actual honored Vietnam soldier who was mentioned? His name was Milton, Milton Olive. I considered your bringing up the topic as akin to attempting to bunt, as in baseball. (You know that most American of games?) By attempting a bunt on two strikes and fouling it off it becomes a "Strike-out". 👍 Being that this is a public and not private forum, which can be read by all, the naming of the Bloods felt very much like an Easter Egg. I think everyone might found that useful and are free to join in and provide their own inputs, and or opinions, as to your Bunt attempt and to my own Walk-Off Grand-Slam. ✨🎈🎶⚾🏆 I awarded myself a Home run for providing the information regarding the background of the names of the Bloods. Because it was still on topic and very much about the era and the film. The bases being loaded I think it was a Grand Slam. 😎 Don't you think? <blockquote>[–] brux (5757) 19 minutes ago I was trying to poke a little fun at the names a lot of African Americans come up with for their kids. On the one hand it is kind of cool to have a unique name, but on the other hand they can be a negative. Studies have shown that African American names on resumes are treated with prejudice.</blockquote> Brux..... I'm pretty sure everyone GOT where you were going. The new-age non-trendy names of African-Americans is pretty stale and dated comic material. <i>The state of Wisconsin is quite famous for having cities named after African-Americans: Kenosha, Racine, Waukesha, Mequon, etc.</i> 🤦‍♀️ But then Wisconsin does have the quite powerful "White" names like: Hayward, Madison, Barron, Marshfield.... 🤦‍♂️ I decided to go for the Homerun when you attempted to bunt and struck out. No offense intended. As far as the names on resumes? Having worked in hiring and HR there was indeed a bias but that extended well beyond just so-called nonsensical names and African-Americans. Saoirse Ronan? Engelbert Humperdinck? Marion Morrison (Is that a male or female?), anything that sounded exotic, foreign or having too many consonants raised an eye-brow or elicited a snicker and maybe put into the "circular" file. Names such as Tyrone, LeRoy, DeShawn, as well as Lakisha and Jamal experienced that type of handicap. <b>Moon Unit Zappa, X æ a 12, Blanket Jackson or Apple Martin is going to get your foot in the door </b>??? Most interviewers and hiring managers are well past that type of 90's schism. <blockquote>OK, being deliberately a little provocative ... easy does it ... posted 16 days ago by brux (5755) 12 replies | jump to latest I watched this movie, and by the end really both enjoyed it and got a lot out of it and thought it was very good. When I watch a movie I've always had this problem remembering the character's names ... same as I do with people I have just met. I can meet someone, shake hands with them and turn around and forget their name until I've said it a number of times and talked to them. <i>So towards the end I started thinking about the "bloods" names. Paul, Otis, Eddie, Melvin ... and Storming' Norman.</i></blockquote>I have to confess that I found this out from a youtubber and I am absolutely astonished that I didn't make the connection myself. Chadwick Boseman's character is named Norman for the most obvious of reasons and it has to do not only with the Temptations but the <b>Motown</b> Sound of that era, Norman Whitfield. Whitfield worked "exclusively" with the Temptations for Motown. <b>DUH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!</b> Whitfield was a true powerhouse of a song writer and producer. I will create a thread of his own to give you an idea of just how prolific and creative he was. Unless you are of a certain age I wouldn't expect most to be familiar with his catalog of hits and songs. Old heads will instantly know who Norman Whitfield was. 😎 As a person who grew up during that period of great intros, that made me smile. No kidding. If an American Airlines flight with a crew of 6 and a passenger list of 112 travelling at an airspeed of 600 MPH, with a crosswind SW to NE, going due north, crashes at night on the border between the USA and Canada; where would they bury the survivors? View all replies >