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johnmiller (688)


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Thriller Without the Thrills Very Kubrickian! Why Open This Against "Godzilla"? Godzilla vs. McDonald's Super Size Meals The Most Toxic Movie Ever? New Edition Soft Focus Cinematography Cinemascope Cinematography Cinematography View all posts >


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They all have to be thin and close to flat-chested. That way, they don't threaten women, who think their men will be attracted to them, and men are more accepting because they can't handle curvy, feminine women. Yeah, it was quite bad, in my opinion. I had formerly volunteered for doing lots of Broadway shows. But, with stuff like this, I do almost none of them. Ever since Michael Eisner, Disney has been a mindless, soulless cash machine. How George Lucas didn't know that they would just do the same routine with "Star Wars" is beyond belief. Agreed! Man, doing three of these in rapid succession is really pushing it. Just as CGI as any "Toy Story" installment. They may have shot background footage in actual locations, digitized it, then integrated it into the rest of the material, but that's it. Nuclear Power was our great savior from carbon-based electricity production. But, the Hollywood Left, like Hanoi Jane Fonda, did everything to stop it. So, instead, we have had four decades of coal as our major electricity production source. And, megatons, if not gigatons, of CO2, coal dust, and other chemicals, being pumped into our atmosphere. This one is fictional, and was made as anti-nuclear propaganda. Chernobyl was run by Russians, so recklessly, to put it mildly. I love the movie until the second she shows up, and love it again (SPOILER) the second she drops dead. Nicholas Pileggi wrote this based on real events and characters. So, Ace is actually based on a real person, and his relationship sounds like it was also based on something real. Movie: <link>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino_(1995_film)</link> Book: <link>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino:_Love_and_Honor_in_Las_Vegas</link> "Gone with the Wind," seen by many as celebrating The Confederacy and the American South of the time, is seen much the same way. Naturally, neither would ever have been made today. View all replies >