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Dalton (216)


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So Bale is a Satanist. I'm not really surprised. My message for TLJ haters. Is there rap music in this? Huge flop in second week. French detective fails to notice rare stamps on envelope. I don't buy it. You can see it for free on youtube - while it lasts. Plot hole: Too much fuss over the small amount of acreage lost to the baseball field. Opened in third place behind two movies released last week. Not the worst-built building in San Francisco.... View all posts >


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If they really want to subvert expectations regarding The Force and complete the deconstruction of the franchise, here's my idea for Ep. 9: The "Force" isn't some mystical spiritual entity you learn to tap into if you become a member of a religious cult, but rather an energy field generated at the core of the galaxy from some gargantuan machine created millions of years ago by the much more advanced ancestors of the current denizens of the galaxy. This "Force Generator", abandoned and long-forgotten, but designed to be completely self-servicing, has functioned until now without anyone truly knowing its full potential, but with a relative handful of "force sensitive" being blindly able to tap into it and use some of its capabilities. Only now, the machine has become unstable. From lack of use, too much power has accumulated in the enormous reserves of the The Force Generator, which the machine must dissipate. So the potential of the machine, which up until now has taken enormous mental effort and training to tap into, has become unlocked and freely available to more and more beings with less and less Force sensitivity. (Hence, Rey and Broom Boy.) Rey, having read and deciphered the "sacred Jedi texts", realizes they are in fact instruction manuals to the Force Generator that have been mistranslated and corrupted over millions of years into religious texts. It has taken Rey, with her almost supernatural female powers of intuition and intelligence, to discover the truth that has been hiding in plain sight of the patriarchal Jedi cult all this time. What to do? Will Rey use and pass along the knowledge of this almost godlike power that doomed the galaxy once before, or will she journey to the core of the galaxy to seek and destroy the machine, thus freeing the entire galaxy from the endless destructive power struggles between "light" and "dark" force users? I understand this is basically the same idea as "Forbidden Planet". But J.J. is a plagiarist, so why not? I watched the bizarre 45 minute "documentary" Marcus Chong self-produced to support his side of the story. You don't have to read too hard between the lines and his biased viewpoint to see that he brought everything on himself through a series of damaging mistakes, poor judgement, and inflated sense of his own value as an actor. He refused to do the looping on a low-budget movie he completed filming in favor of acting in a Broadway play, pissing off the producer, and was subsequently blacklisted from his agency, William Morris. As a result, he did not have competent representation when he signed on to do The Matrix, nor a valid contract as he worked on the film in Australia. He did seem to be grossly exploited as a result. The big mistake was expecting Hollywood producers to act like generous compassionate human beings and treat him fairly when he had no contract specifying such. During the filming, his reputation for being "difficult" was cemented as he chafed at the disparate salary and poor perks and treatment he received compared to other supporting actors in the film. Even so, if he had just accepted his part in it once the movie became a hit and made reasonable demands for the sequels, understanding his position was weakened by what he accepted for the first film, he could have parlayed the exposure into better and more lucrative roles. Instead, he destroyed himself over pride and jealousy. Short of coming out as a Republican, he couldn't have ruined his acting career more thoroughly. I enjoyed his performance in the movie, but didn't exactly miss the character in the two sequels. This wouldn't exactly be the equivalent of polishing a turd, because Mythbusters once did a segment showing that was actually possible. What Ivan Ortega is attempting to do is polish a rusty bucket overflowing with diarrhea. You know what? You got me there. I was thinking of the wrong guy. Is the Nostalgia Critic still around? I thought his schtick fell out of favor a few years ago. Never could stand him. He trashed 2001: A Space Odyssey. That should really disqualify him as a serious critic. Streep certainly added to my desire not to see this. You want to be careful in criticism or assumptions when you're dealing with real people and not characters in a fictional story of course. That advice offered (and somewhat ignored), I wouldn't say they hated her. It's more like they became resigned to the fact they couldn't do anything for her. How long would you stay involved with anyone if it did no good and you only received (undeserved) hate and resentment for trying? I get the impression that the daughter's recollections throughout her interview were colored by a deep hurt that her mother (even though profoundly demented at the time) had apparently completely forgotten about her own daughter in her final days in favor of some imaginary suitor. Page after page after page in a nearly four-month journal and it doesn't appear the mother thought about her even once. I was convinced this was what the daughter was thinking about when she mentioned something about an "unconventional princess who didn't need a man" or something like that. OK, I'll play. I disagree. Not all people in the north shore suburbs are Democrats. Chicago is hopelessly and permanently Democrat-ruled, but this stems mostly from the large minority population (over 50% in Chicago city limits) and the working-class white Daley Democrats who have a vested interest in the status quo more than any strong leftist ideological convictions. Upper middle class people living in the suburbs tend to be a little more conservative and favoring of Republicans. You go out to the collar counties and it's much more balanced, even Republican-leaning, but there is almost never enough of a difference to overcome that strong Chicago Democrat advantage. Also, the mom had too many children to be a Democrat. Kevin would clearly have been aborted (if even conceived) for the sake of the environment or career. I like Die Hard. Really like it. But a Christmas movie? No. I saw it the first weekend in came out in July 1988 and I've never watched it or felt compelled to watch it during the Christmas holiday season. It has always had a summery vibe to me despite the few Christmas references. A few years ago it apparently became "cool" to claim Die Hard as your favorite Christmas movie. (I think it was all started by a single "clever" reviewer for some magazine or newspaper in the UK.) Doing so was intended to signal that you were "ironic" and "edgy", that you thought outside of the box, and that you were too smart and sophisticated to fall for that mawkish sentimental traditional Christmas stuff. But lately far too many people have glommed onto this, it's beginning to be seen for what it is - a phony conceit, and the inevitable backlash has begun. It's about time. Not a good sign when you make a film - and release it at Christmas - that starts with a premise that appeals only to hardcore SJWs (heroic gay(?) cross dresser who is beat up by evil white cis-gender male neo-nazis and retreats into a fantasy world where women fight and win WWII) and then end up pissing off the Respect Wahmen crowd. Hasn't Zemeckis taken the course on intersectionality yet? I gather the big problem was he put the women in "girlie" dresses instead of men's military uniforms or dirty beige sackcloth? Doesn't he realize only men can dress that way and be "respected"? The film must be seriously awful to achieve a miserable 40 Metascore as the premise alone ought to have garnered rave critical reviews sight unseen. Who is left to see this? Very few apparently as the film finished 10th on its opening weekend despite being shown on nearly 2000 screens. View all replies >