Mostly a misfire


This film had it's interesting moments, and plenty of potential, but I think it failed in the most important thing: it failed to explain the main protagonist's motives. What do we know about Cheney after having seen it? That he was a careerist, unscrupulous businessman? A pragmatic schemer, or someone who at least in some instances acted on his convictions, and if so, what those convictions were? A loving father, lifelong lackey to his intensely ambitious wife, a patriot, closeted autocrat? It's as confusing as neoconservativism itself, but this film doesn't do a good job in tackling this enigma. Instead it throws in a docudrama-level cacophony of narrations, and voice-overs, and info-graphics, whereas it only needed to get inside this character and tell his story.

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Exactly it tells us nothing about him, we don't know why he is what he is.

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In one interview Christian Bale even goes on to say that the invasion of Iraq was something Cheney believed to have been the right thing to do based on his convictions. However, I personally thought the movie didn't do much in the way of clarifying that.

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It absolutely *did explain his motives*. I could give them but that would be pointless wouldn't it?
I read the book --yes there is one-- years ago. The film though hardly perfect does a nice job but it doesn't spell
things out, viewers are going to have to get it on their own.

The Bush administration was an abomination. Nothing will even remotely compare to it including Trump (he's only going to get 1 term Bush had two).

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