MovieChat Forums > Take Me to the RiverĀ (2015) Discussion > SPOILERS: Everything you wanted to know ...

SPOILERS: Everything you wanted to know about this movie explained.


As children, Cindy and Keith have some degree of incestuous relationship, instigated by her natural childish discovery of the pleasure to be found by grinding her naughty bits against his neck in the chicken fight game. It is unclear how far this relationship goes, but seems likely that it went far beyond childish chicken fights, to the extent that Keith may actually be Ryder's father. At the very least, we know that she frequently begged him to play the chicken fight game. At some point their mother discovered, and Keith was blamed.

Cindy moved to California not just to go to college, but to get away, possibly pregnant with Ryder and not wanting him to grow up in that environment. Keith resented that, may very well have wanted to have a family with her or at least be a father to Ryder.

Keith has an incestuous relationship with Molly, who loves the chicken fight game that he taught her. He wonders if Cindy taught Ryder. He has lots of unresolved feels with Cindy, over her leaving, feeling judged, even betrayed by her.

He orchestrates the entire series of events. Molly (happily?) follows all of his instrucions, from pretending she wants only Ryder to tie her shoes to screaming she wants him to take her to the barn, to her first effort at chickenfighting with him, to running out screaming with fake blood on her dress. Keith's vehement refusal to allow anyone to examine Molly is because there is no injury.

Everything that follows is according to his plan. His specific motives may be subject to some speculation, but at the root of it, he wants to get back at Cindy. To do that, he makes Ryder out to be a predator, as he had been viewed as victimizing Cindy back when. A lot of his behavior bears contemplation, such as during the dinner he invites Ryder to. The message he wrote on the car was for both Ryder and Cindy, Cindy was desperate to not let their mother see it...

Keith set up the dinner so that Ryder would most likely show up alone, if at all. What would he have done if Ryder hadn't shown, or if the parents came, or if they'd called? Who knows. But sending Abby out with one extra horse made it easiest and most likely for Ryder to go alone.

He said he wanted Ryder to feel comfortable and know that there were no hard feelings, but that was obviously not true, as he went to great lengths to make him uncomfortable. The mother asked where his parents were, as if they were expected. He put Ryder at the head of the table and Molly next to him. Not sure about the reason for Molly's demeanor when she came out to the table. was she acting as if Ryder had in fact victimized her? The thing about guessing the ages of the girls? Sending Ryder and Molly into her room alone? Coming in just as he approached her to find out what the message on the game thingy was, as if he suspected wrongdoing. Taking him out to talk about the gun.

I think the whole gun thing was to warn Ryder not to mess with him. Not to tell anyone what he either had or was going to figure out about Keith and Molly.

Then he sent him back with Molly. He gave her explicit instructions, she smiled, she liked the game he was telling her to play. Everything she did was what he wanted her to do. Take him to the river, get him swimming, chicken fight to orgasm, then desert him.

When he got home, no mention was made of where he'd been. Nothing was said about Molly abandoning him. Keith dominated the conversation. Made it clear that Molly had chicken fought with ryder, and that he didn't know how to play. Obviously she knew how to play, he had taught her. Acted surprised that Cindy hadn't taught Ryder, after all it was her favorite game.

So basically he was saying, now you know how it feels to be branded a pervert when you did nothing wrong, someone else manipulated you. I am now an incestuous father and it's your fault, you started it all. My incestuous sex slave will do and say anything that I say, and I have a gun, so don't try to mess with me. You're no better than me, you victimized me, I victimized you back.

Mom feels guilty because she feels responsible for what Ryder went through, for what Keith went through, for what Molly is going through. Ryder tells her she did nothing wrong. She was a child innocently experimenting with feelings she didn't understand. Dad doesn't have the first clue what is going on, but you can bet Keith will clarify it for him if anyone tries to mess with him, don't forget the gun, and don't forget that Molly will surely say that Ryder raped her if he tells her to. Everyone saw the blood, everyone thinks he is a molester. So nobody can do anything, everybody feels like *beep* Keith has his revenge and his little sex slave. End of story.

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Take him to the river, get him swimming, chicken fight to orgasm, then desert him.


I laughed so hard upon reading this it hurt my face. Just the phrase is hilarious.

It seems pretty plausible what you describe is true, I certainly think that Ryder is Keith's son, but why does Molly say that's not her real family, is she an incest baby as well?

But yeah, I think it's a story where they play it out like the uncle is being a dick for no reason and he's just a molesting monster when it's really Ryder's mom who was the molesting monster all along.

What confuses me is why the Uncle assumes the sister/brother molestation and parent/child molestation are either equivocal or excusable. Just because you had a thing with your sister why would you then have a thing with your daughter? Is it just that whole "cycle of abuse" thing or a domination thing?

They didn't seem similar to me because of the whole "child" vs "your own age" aspect. I feel like that's a WHOLE other different thing.

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Well I think in his mind it's certainly her fault he is molesting Molly.
In his mind he is excused by her guilt.

Sure it seems different as you said, sibling vs adult/child.

But if you think about it, that's just two lines that need crossing. She obliterated the incest line when she instigated their incestuous activities. That's one line. They were children when she did it. That's the other.

So his initial sexual focus was A)incest and B)child so it's actually pretty realistic that he would transfer that to Molly. The problem is that he doesn't see the difference between his sister being a child and not realizing that what she was doing wasn't allowed vs an adult who should know better manipulating his child.

As far as Molly's 'not my real family' comment, I am still pretty much in the dark. I don't see any other comments made or connections to draw with regard to that. The best I can figure is that it could be something of a dissociative coping strategy to deal with the fact that her father is making a sex object of her. I don't see any support for her being an incest baby.

Who knows, looking at the closeness in ages of the three older girls, maybe it can be taken at face value: it ISN'T her family, and she ISN'T adopted. Maybe she was kidnapped or something, who knows? They certainly didn't put anything to clarify it as far as I could see.

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What confuses me is why the Uncle assumes the sister/brother molestation and parent/child molestation are either equivocal or excusable. Just because you had a thing with your sister why would you then have a thing with your daughter? Is it just that whole "cycle of abuse" thing or a domination thing?


I could be wrong, but I assumed that the uncle was the "aggressor" and the mom the victim, when they were kids. Saying that the mom initiated their "game" is just deflecting the blame off of himself. Otherwise, why is she crying? I guess hypothetically it could be guilt, but a (deliberate) reminder of trauma seems more plausible IMO.

This also explains the uncle's manipulating things between Ryder and Molly, as well as his seemingly inconsistent behavior. The whole thing is him exerting power, as abusers typically do. Whether or not he's actually abusing Molly is left open, but it seems likely to me that he is - in the sense of "once a predator, always a predator," not to mention some of Molly's strangely inappropriate behavior toward her older cousin.

How Keith came to be this way from an early age, is anyone's guess. The most likely explanation is that he was abused himself, probably by his father or another relative.

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I assumed that the uncle was the "aggressor" and the mom the victim, when they were kids.

No. You think that because of subconscious preprogramming in double standard of men always being the bad guy, and women always being innocent.

Keith said, "Didn't your mother teach you that one, Ryder?". This implies Cindy taught Keith sexual acts.

And then Keith says, "She use to love that game... ...she was always asking me to go down to the river with her." Further discussing Cindy's incestuous addiction.

And finally Keith says, "Your grandma always thought that game was my idea, but it was always yours, wasn't it, Cindy?" This shows Keith was wrongly blamed for the incest, just like Ryder was wrongly blamed for molesting Molly in the barn the day prior.

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When logic and science aren't on your side, you always lose.

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What confuses me is why the Uncle assumes the sister/brother molestation and parent/child molestation are either equivocal or excusable. Just because you had a thing with your sister why would you then have a thing with your daughter? Is it just that whole "cycle of abuse" thing or a domination thing?

I don't think either Cindy or Ryder find it excusable, I just think they both know there's not a damn thing they could do about it.

Why? Because about two dozen people saw Molly come running out of the barn with blood on her crotch and would testify in court Ryder raped her. If they tried to call the cops on Keith, Ryder would be going to jail. And Cindy would come to light as the incestuous demon years ago (although statue limitations may apply).

Really there is no winner. Everyone comes to light as a monster in this movie.


_______
When logic and science aren't on your side, you always lose.

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