MovieChat Forums > The Stand Discussion > Did Hollywood Gender Swap the Judge?

Did Hollywood Gender Swap the Judge?


I don't care if they race swapped Larry, but it appears they did gender swap the dear old judge. Pretty sure the judge was a male in the book.

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Also Ralph Brentner and the Rat Man have been gender swapped. And not a gender swap, but Nick Andros is now apparently an illegal alien.

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2 Where do you get this from?

Nick Andros is now apparently an illegal alien.

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https://reason.com/2020/12/13/hollywood-still-cant-figure-out-how-to-adapt-the-stand/


(For instance, the saintly deaf-mute Nick Andros, a Nebraskan in the book, has become an illegal Salvadoran immigrant in the miniseries, Andros being an old Salvadoran family name.)


The author was being sarcastic, of course, in reference to Andros being a Salvadoran name.

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2 Yes; rather obvious sarcasm in the link.

And I agree that many, if not most, of the changes, were made so the writers and producers can feel good about being so, well, virtuous.

Please note that I have no objections to most of the changes themselves, just the ridiculous virtue signalling that Hollywood seems to be obsessed with these days.

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So Rat man is now Rat Woman and he can't call Larry "Wonderbread" or Ralph "Farmer John"

:/

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Pretty sure the judge was the only black person in the Boulder Free Zone besides the mystical mother abigail(and they sent him on a suicide mission). Basically everyone else in gods army was white as rice, while the only minorities were evil and gathering bombs in Vegas. If ever a remake needed a splash diversity, it's this one.

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Other than Ratman, what minorities were in Vegas?

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Just a few extras in the Vegas crowd that can be seen. The fact that we can only name two in an 8 hour mini-series with a bunch of named characters kind of proves the point.

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Mother Abigail was black and the "Moses" of the boulder group but that's still not enough for you people is it?

Kareem Abdul Jabar was in it too? Did you forget him?

Newsflash pal. Blax are only 13% of the population. How many of them do you think would be left after Captain Trips?

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Well if were just going by demographics, white people only make up 60 something percent of the population yet were about 95% of the characters in the last one. So Captain Trips must be low key racist.

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Either that or you are. And we're talking 1994 so those demographics aren't the same as today now are they? And what year was it in the book? 1990. Factor in also that Trips killed 99.4% of the world population for that time and what's that leave you with?

Maybe instead of spending all your time bitching write your own fucking story

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1978 for the book actually. ‘90 was just when the uncut version was finally released

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> 1978 for the book actually.

I've heard it was originally that way but I've never read the first edition. I read a version of the "short" book before he published the uncut version. I'm pretty sure the one I read was set in 1986.

This sort of thing can cause problems for a story. The strangest case I've seen is The Power, by Frank Robinson. The book was set in the 1950s and was made into a movie in the late 1960s, with George Hamilton, Suzanne Pleshette, and Michael Rennie. Later Robinson decided to update the book to the 1990s. So he changed all the dates but little else. The main character was a Korean War vet and is now a Gulf War veteran. Other than that, hardly anything.

The result was a bizarre setting -- it's the 1990s but Blacks are called Negroes, elevators have lift attendants, most adults smoke, etc. Weird.

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Hm, I don’t think there was an ‘80s edition, just the cut ‘78 and the uncut ‘90

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2 If I may, I think I can clear this up. There were three versions of the book set in 1980, 1985, and 1990.

The 1978 edition was set in 1980 and was somewhat confusing at first, due to references to stuff that they had to edit out to make it more to the publisher's liking. We did not see, for example, Larry Underwood acquiring the .30-30 rifle in the original, only references to it once he had it. Another was his fantasy about being Inspector Underwood of The Yard. The Wolf-man that the Four came across in Colorado is mentioned only in passing and The Kid is changed from the repulsive character in the original to that of an equally repugnant dirty old man in a wife-beater and a T-bird. The poor editing of the 1978 book is evident in the number of errors it contains. I've said this before, but King, while he is a marvelous storyteller is a very sloppy writer sometimes.

The 1980 paperback edition, edition set in 1985, is essentially the same book as the 1978 version, with the exception of the dates and changing Harold Lauder's candy bar of choice to a Milky Way.

In the 1988 edition, set in 1990, the mysteries are clear up, regarding the .30-30, and Inspector Underwood, we are told of the things missed in the 1978 version, and we have the additional material of Campion's escape from Project Blue and we also have what (spoiler)happened to Flagg after Vegas, among other things. And, just as in the 1978 version, the number of mistakes is legion here as well.

Hm, I don’t think there was an ‘80s edition, just the cut ‘78 and the uncut ‘90


Hope this helps.

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Ah, didn't realize anything was changed from the cut hardcover to paperback. In the uncut '90 version, Harold eats Paydays, no?

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Yep. IIRC he also ate Paydays in the 1985 setting.

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2 No; he definitely ate Milky Ways in 1985, but it was changed back to Paydays in the 1988 C&U.

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Ah'll take yer word fer it; like Ah said b'low, it's been at leas' twenny years since Ah read the 1985 version.

Either way, he was packing a lot of weight. In the new miniseries he's of normal weight, and his personal grooming seems far better than in the book. His hairstyle and fashion choices do mark him as being considerably out of touch with his teen peers ... unless I'm horribly out of touch with teenage fashion, which is quite possible. But I don't see any kids around here who look like him.

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> The Wolf-man that the Four came across in Colorado is mentioned only in passing and The Kid is changed from the repulsive character in the original to that of an equally repugnant dirty old man in a wife-beater and a T-bird.

I very vaguely remember this in the 1985 version. Without The Kid's story to explain it, the dead Wolfman became an unsolvable mystery – the four find him, wonder what the hell happened, muse that they'll never know, and we readers never know either. Kind of a nice touch, really – there's not only all the weirdness that we and the characters see, but a lot more beyond that.

As for the old man in the wife-beater … yeah, that rings a bell but I can't recall details at all. I had the 1985 and 1990 versions, but when I moved from one home to another about twenty years ago, the 1990 book made it but the 1985 got lost somewhere. I haven't read it since then. I might pick up a used copy somewhere and give it another look.

Another thing I remember is that the 1990 version briefly mentioned AIDS; a doctor made comparisons between it and the superflu. The 1985 book didn't have that IIRC.

The new miniseries is set in something like the present day. Harold has a MacBook or something similar, the Internet is mentioned, and when Lloyd and Poke rob a service station the cigarette prices on the wall are reasonably current. I haven't thought through which changes in characterization, plot, et cetera are due to this but I'm sure many are. You can't move a story forward 40 years from its original setting without some consequences; I mentioned The Power above as an example.

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Why do you care that they gender-swapped the judge? The main cast is still predominantly male so it doesn't make that much of a difference.

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At what point in my OP did I express care for what gender the judge is? The title of the post is "Did Hollywood Gender Swap the Judge?" That means it was a question. Were you not taught in school that a sentence that begins with the word "Did" and ends with a question mark is a question?

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2 The thread did get sidetracked, didn't it? Anyway, the Judge is gender-swapped in this version.

At what point in my OP did I express care for what gender the judge is? The title of the post is "Did Hollywood Gender Swap the Judge?" That means it was a question. Were you not taught in school that a sentence that begins with the word "Did" and ends with a question mark is a question?

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You expressed care when you answered your own question, and then stated that you didn't care that they race-swapped Larry, implying that you did care that they gender-swapped the judge. Or do you usually ask questions that you know the answer to for no reason?

I was genuinely interested in why you thought it mattered, as I haven't read the book (or can't remember if I've read it, it's been a long time) and couldn't think of any integral reason why the character needed to be male.

You also haven't answered my question, but that's okay, I won't ask you for your education history.

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I had previously read a discussion where people were complaining that they race swapped Larry. I should have prefaced my statement about not caring if they race swapped Larry, with that information, and for that I do apologize. When I made my initial post, it had been over 25 years since I last read this novel and my mind was a bit fuzzy on some details. It's also been around 20 years since I have watched the original TV mini-series.

There is no integral reason for the character to be male. The character can be whatever sex the writers (or casting agents) choose, so long as the character is present, because I do remember them playing some significant part in the story's ending (the details of which, I do not recall). Since I pulled out my copy of the book and started reading it again, that will be cleared up.

Even though it is not germane to the conversation, I will inform you that my education history includes a Masters of Business Administration.

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No hard feelings. A Masters in anything is cool, but one in Business Admin sounds practical and cool, so congrats on that.

As time passes, I feel certain that I read the book at one stage, but I cannot for the life of me remember a thing about it - the 1994 mini-series stayed with me longer, and it never occurred to me that race or gender mattered much in relation to any of the characters.

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Because altering things to fulfill a certain narrative is weird and dangerous.

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In what way is it weird or dangerous?

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I wrote a story about my childhood,.but hollyweird tells me If I want to create a film.

My childhood friends must nclude a person of color which, would be a lie.
Forcing this change is a force.

Some power is trying to push a agenda.

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YOURE OK WITH DIFFERENT COLORED PEOPLE BUT NOT WITH WOMEN?...I GUESS THATS PROGRESS.

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I am fine with women. Again...at what point in my original post did I indicate any issue with what gender the judge is? The title of the post is "Did Hollywood Gender Swap the Judge?" That means it was a question. When I posted this, it had been well over 25 years since I read the novel and my recollection was fuzzy regarding some of the characters.

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"I don't care if they race swapped Larry, but it appears they did gender swap the dear old judge. Pretty sure the judge was a male in the book."


KEEP PRACTICING YOUR ENGLISH.🙂

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Considering that English is my primary language, would you care to elaborate on why I should "keep practicing" my English?

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2 I don't have a dog in this fight but the implication from your OP is that while you did not care about Larry's race-swap, you DID care about the judge's gender swap.

"I don't care if they race swapped Larry, but it appears they did gender swap the dear old judge. Pretty sure the judge was a male in the book."


Perhaps it wasn't your intention but you certainly gave the impression that the gender-swap of the judge did matter to you. It appears that I am not alone in this view, either.

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Fair enough. I certainly did not mean to give that impression, and after going back to my OP, I realize that I should have placed a question mark at the end of the sentence, as opposed to a period like I did. I'll just chalk it up to a grammatical error on my part.

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2 Good; thank you. How did you like the book?

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From what I remember of it (it's been around 25 years since I read it last), it was very good. I recently downloaded it to my iPad so I can go back and read it again.

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2 If you don't mind a bit of shameless self-promotion here, I have a book on kindle that can fairly be described as The Stand without the supernatural stuff.

It is called The Pale Horse, and it tells the story of a group of Marxist fanatics that release a virus that kills the majority of the human race. Both the pandemic and the aftermath are reported, but the aftermath is the majority of the story.

It is not politically correct, even though I have created a good (and realistic, I think) cast of characters that represent US society in the eary 21st Century. Minorities and females are well-represented as both good and bad guys.

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The judge had about 30 seconds of screen time and half of that was as a corpse. It honestly didn't matter in the least.

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> It honestly didn't matter in the least.

Agreed. They could have breed-swapped Kojak and made him a German shepherd and it would have had exactly the same impact.

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