MovieChat Forums > Delicacy (2011) Discussion > Another Tautou disaster

Another Tautou disaster


I'm probably missing something here but when did it become entertaining to present a woman having a mental breakdown as entertainment? Audrey Tautoo contracts a dissociative disorder and acts in a completely irrational way. First she kisses a man and has no memory of it. Later, she leaves her office in a daze and, when she comes to, finds she has left Paris and is out in the countryside near where she used to live.

It's presented to us as a romantic comedy so my selective summary of the plot is obviously misleading.

http://opionator.wordpress.com/2012/04/24/delicacy-or-la-delicatesse-2 011/

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I think you missed the film's self-irony?

And I wouldn't say she "contracts a dissociative disorder" (you can't "contract" a psychological disorder anyway, but you can develop one). Rather, she is swamped by grief and confusion following the sudden death of her husband.

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Hmmm. I accept there is something we call irony but I confess ignorance of self-irony. As a British English usage, you can contract a disease whether physical or psychological. And, yes, this is a character swamped by grief and suffering from a mental illness as a result. Unless you have a different explanation for her irrational behaviour.

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Sorry, but no. You cannot contract a psychological disorder / mental illness.

"The world moves for love, It kneels before it in awe" - The Village

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My apologies, I had hoped to discuss the merits of the film rather than usages. However, since you have started the ball rolling, what is your authority for asserting that, in colloquial British English, you cannot contract a mental illness?

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Under the umbrella of "British colloquialism" it may be possible to defend any interpretation of a word. However I too was of the assumption that one could "contract" only a contagious condition, not a psychological one.

"If you don't like the trousers, it's easy to spot the stain", is my attitude with movies. If a movie makes me smile, as did this one, then I find it much easier to overlook what may be, to others, glaring deficiencies.

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To contract is to catch or become ill with a disease, mental or physical. In this instance, I have no idea why you should want to limit the meaning to contagious and exclude infectious as well as mental but, then, we all have our differing views of language and the meanings words convey. None of this changes my view of the film which I still think is a disaster for the reasons I gave in the initial review.

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Well apart from the fact you can't even spell her name correctly, I also disagree with the rest of your post. Other replies have already dealt with this, but surely the fact that she was suffering huge grief from losing her husband would excuse any irrational behaviour on her part. When she leaves the office later (hardly in a "daze", and she doesn't "come to") I think she was trying to connect with her past, possibly recollecting happy memories.

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Sincerest thanks. I tend to write quickly and my proofreading does not always pick up errors. As to the substance of your post, this is what I write, "Of course, I may be completely wrong. Many of you people out there may think it’s perfectly normal for a woman who has been grieving for three years suddenly to throw herself at a older man, and then walk away from her prestigious job promoting Sweden to Europe. In such a case, you are likely to find Delicacy or La délicatesse a delightful romantic drama,"

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Completely random irrational action as a plot twister is OK for films like "Dumb & Dumber", but in this case it looks like lack of creativity of writers (it seems like they could not figure out how to make that guy so adorable that her spontaneous kiss could be explained rationally). Writers could simply drug main rational heroes first, before allowing them to commit irrational actions, otherwise plot looks quite stupid. Attempt to make it look like new love interest is her personal hallucination also doesn't help, because it looks pretentious too (I didn't watched to the end in order to figure that out).

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Remember she looked at a key that was her husbands shortly before the swedish guy entered her office. I thought it was some kind of "ghostly sign" from her husband that it was time to move on

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ps:- if you thought this was a mental breakdown stay away from antichrist and the piano teacher

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Please stick to watching films designed for your age group - 6 year olds.
This was not made for you. It was intended for those who can think.

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[deleted]

How dare they present human beings as anything other than happy go lucky and well adjusted in a comedy.
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Depression and grief should be left to serious films I suppose?

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Ridiculous criticism. Since when is any movie not a fictionalized, escapist film. The film is entertaining, cute, interesting, shows pain as well as hope for healing - without being overly mushy drama.

Tautou has long done movies that have an air of surrealism to them within the framework of real life. It's quite a fine genre and if you don't get it fine. But the criticism offered is so subjective and biased in its description - it renders the critique empty. If you don't get the genre, stop watching them. Stick to Adam Sandler flicks.

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"Since when is any movie not a fictionalized, escapist film." The answer to this question is simple. When the film is intended to be a credible representation of reality presented to us for our entertainment. In The Hedgehog or Le hérisson (2009) for example, the unexpected love between the caretaker and the wealthy Japanese tenant is deeply moving and sensitively portrayed. Of course all criticism is subjective and we are free to disagree. I would, however, be interested in engaging in a debate with you. What specific reasons do you have for finding my opinions biased? Are not all opinions merely a different way of expressing things we believe to be true? What therefore is wrongly argued or misstated in my review?

For the record, I have never paid to see an Adam Sandler film. We can agree they are terrible.

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In general I agree with free opinion, but when you reach the stupidity it kinda hurts my senses.

As a "rational" person, how a presumed hole in the plot is "another Tautou disaster"? I think the writers and directors are to blame for this. It's ok, you don't have to explain, one because I don't want any other BS from you and two because I am not trying the find the rational everywhere. Omg, if only every one of us would be half rational from what you pretend to be...

Anyway, I consider this movie a very refreshing and naturally flowing one and I am really happy the french still know how to make them.

For people like you, covering my ass, I declare that "of course, I may be completely wrong" and I am totally responsible for the following interpretation.

I don't think Nathalie's grief is entirely only for her husband. I think it is about something that followed us along the whole movie. Her grief was about something that she didn't have and she will never have, something you can feel it, almost touch it, you know it is there somewhere, something known and forgotten, something that an invisible and impenetrable wall keeps you away from it. That something for Nathalie is a baby from her deceased husband.
That's how Markus is presented to us. Almost bald, funny, sulky, vulnerable and whatever. She doesn't want him from the start, she looks at him as a friend for the most part of the movie and only in the end she comes to the undertsanding that he may be more than that. Not sure though, he is hiding where she used to play with her friends in childhood.

I am not going to explain that one too. Use your imagination if you have any.

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It's good to imagine others enjoying this film.

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I am sorry you couldn't enjoy it.

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I paid for my wife and I to see it so I was sad too. We both hated it.

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My husband got free tickets through his work so I suppose it was easier for us to enjoy it.:) Anyway, both of us like Tautou very much so...

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I thought it was a really gentle and lovely romantic film that approached some serious issues with genuine inquisitiveness.

Sometimes it really IS the expectations and preconceptions of others that stop you moving on and changing .

This film deserves a bit more respect .

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Life is not always glitter & gold, every thing always goes the way you plan and happy happy happy. Life is a mixture of many man experiences that are both positive and negative. I can't stand movies that are all happy go lucky and end with everyone happy and all mushy and joy and the angels coming down from the sky's with bright lights singing hallelujah. That is not life.
I ask myself, did some of the critics and users really sit back, let this movie unfold & truly watch it with a clear & open mind. The acting was superb by both leads. You totally feel as if it where you that had her pain, her anguish, her moving around the world as if she really wasn't there. A shadow. He does an amazing job of portraying just how awkward & plain he is to everyone around him, as if he really isn't there. Like a shadow. And he does a brilliant job of the portraying the stages and feelings of love...awkwardness, excitement, embarrassment, confusion, and the giddiness of that moment when you realize you have found true love.
Let's face it, it conveys just how shallow people can be. That is life

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His best perfomance was in " Un long dimanche de fiançailles" (2004).
A stubborn girl with limp....

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Thanks. Will have to check that movie out c

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