MovieChat Forums > Little Ashes (2008) Discussion > So are the two guys gay in the film??

So are the two guys gay in the film??


Iv not actually watched the film but i was just wondering =D =D
ta xxx

Queen of the Superficial

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Federico García Lorca -- absolutely, was brutally murdered for it, in fact. Salvador Dalí -- probably, but was completely unable to cope with it and always denied it.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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Ok thanks!!
xxx

Queen of the Superficial

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Actually, I've read both bio's of Dali,(wrote a paper on him for college, too) and there's an undercurrent of bi-sexual feelings there. HOWEVER, as much as he liked being loved and adored by others,(namely Lorca) he also detested the idea of any kind of sexual 'violation'. He and Galuchka were very close, and I sensed that he welcomed her affairs with other men to take off the pressure of marital relations between them. And I've never read of them having any children, so it is quite possible that he MAY have died a virgin.

Just a theory.

~Inkdrchr! "How can you expect me not to kill you when I haven't had my COFFEE yet!!!"

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I went and saw an exhibit in Venice and it said that he was so distraught over his wide dying that he went into seclusion for a bunch of years. So I imagine that the homoerotic undertones are a bit exaggerated. Maybe he was bi.

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It's been a long time since I read Gibson's bio, but frankly, I remember it being a lot more complex than that. Their relationship had been deteriorating for decades and by the end of it they more or less despised one another, but at the same time had so thoroughly abused and alienated everyone around them they were the only ones left that could much stand either of them, besides which Dalí had always been exceptionally dependent on Gala because despite his artistic brilliance he had some really basic, practical and profound limitations. So, without her he was very much alone in the world and rather lost. But the years leading up to her death were anything but happy and loving between them, and as far as I can tell, none of that has any bearing whatsoever on his sexuality one way or the other. There's nothing really simple and straightforward about any of this story, much less the messy end of it. But the fact that he summoned Lorca's biographer to his deathbed because he wanted the story to be told and made clear, emphasizing all the while that Lorca had been his soulmate and so forth, I think speaks for itself.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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You "sensed" he welcomed her affairs? It is well known that Dali actively recruited men for Gala so he could watch them have sex. One biography of him claims that his favorite act of voyeurism involved sailors having anal sex with his wife, but I've never seen that particular revelation confirmed by any other source.

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True... I have also read that Dali had a fear of penetration whether it be homo or hetero.

I thought this movie was so very sad. I loved it. For some reason it stayed with me. The acting was also very well done... very brave choice for the actors. Rob Pattinson is a pleasant surprise.

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Federico García Lorca -- absolutely, was brutally murdered for it, in fact.


Wasn't Lorca murdered more because of his political beliefs than for his sexuality? I thought he was executed by the Franco regime because he spoke out against the government and wanted a revolution.

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Significant controversy remains about the motives and details of his death. Personal, non-political motives have also been suggested. García Lorca's biographer, Stainton, states that his killers made remarks about his sexual orientation, suggesting that it played a role in his death.[15] Ian Gibson states that García Lorca´s assassination was part of a campaign of mass executions directed to eliminate all the supporters of the Popular Front.[14] Gibson proposes that it is likely that rivalry between right wing groups was a major factor in his death; Former CEDA Parliamentary Deputy, Ramon Ruiz Alonso not only arrested García Lorca at the Rosales' home, but also the one responsible for the original denunciation that led to the arrest warrant being issued.

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And the fact that several of those involved in the killing were cousins of his on the Alba side of the family (who had been feuding with the Garcías over water easements on adjacent sugar beet fields for centuries and who were wholly fascist, while the Garcías were strongly socialist) seems to have been a rather huge factor, too, especially given that Lorca had just weeks before completed his scathingly anti-totalitarian The House of Bernarda Alba just weeks before (his mother had begged him to change the surname used, fearing reprisals, but he had refused). But, for that matter, Lorca's former lover Phillip Cummings also reported that when Lorca visited him in Vermont in 1930, Lorca was fearing for his life at the hands of relatives he thought had discovered he was gay and planned to off him as an honor killing. So, it does seem to have been a whole lot of different things going on at once, but the fact that his killers bragged they'd given him "two shots up the ass for being a [email protected]" does really pin that as being one of the big motives.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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Thank you for your extensive and insightful information about these artists. I have read your posts in other threads as well and have learned so much. Unfortunately, I am one of those people who have missed out so much by not knowing about them and their work. I'm guilty of watching this movie only because of Rob Pattinson. But after watching the movie, I found myself wanting to learn more about them. The actors have done a really good job of making the characters interesting enough that I needed to learn more.

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He was assassinated by the National Front (they were not yet in power, this was during the civil war) because García Lorca had overtly supported and worked with the Republican government. In his plays, he always defends the most discriminated and powerless strata of society, and criticises totalitarianism and conservative views. So yes, he was obviously an enemy of the right-wing factions in the country.

But, the fact that he was known to be gay and that his family was quite a wealthy one with rivals in the town, did obviously not help to keep him safe. It is still a mystery why he chose to go back to his town, knowing that the National Front had a strong influence around the area, instead of searching refuge in the part of Spain that was still under Republican protection.

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It is puzzling why Lorca chose to go back to Granada and didn't stay in the north or take the opportunity to get out of Spain. He must have known what might happen.

I also can't understand why Dali chose to support Franco's regime after what happened to Lorca.

There'll always be an England ....

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i agree, it stayed with me too for some reason. i was also pleasantly suprised by the acting. i can't get over this film.

"no stone throwing, regardless of housing situation"

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I haven't been able to get this film out of my head since I saw it about a month ago. I am just fascinated by the relationship between Lorca and Dali as portrayed in the film.

There'll always be an England ....

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> Federico García Lorca -- absolutely, was brutally murdered for it, in fact.

The movie implied that he was murdered for the things he wrote about Franco.

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What Would Jesus Do For A Klondike Bar (WWJDFAKB)?

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