why english????


I didn't see any comments about this.... Maybe there are some. I hope so.
Why did they make this movie in english? What's the point? what's the point of those ridicule accents?
I mean you have 2 options: spanish or english. I would go to spanish, but english it is, ok. Then why put in their mouths a spanish accent? And very bad... very very bad... I speak english and spanish, bu their accents are so bad that many times, I didn't understand what they were saying.

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It was a British - Spanish joint venture. Partial funding for the film cam from British sources that stipulated that some British actors be used. The script was written in English - the writer and director are both British.

Most of the cast, with the exception of Rob and Matthew McNulty are Spanish




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also by making it in english they can tap into a wider audience and a larger market

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yeah...that was kind of strange...Im also mad that they had to translate everything that was said in Spanish (subtitles...maybe?). The movie itself was ok, but as you said, they should've pick either spanish or english...and, though the acting was somewhat good, Spain has many many great actors that could've portrayed Dali and Buñuel perfectly in Spanish.





.distraction is an obstruction to the construction.

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The Spanish know all about Lorca, Bunuel and Dali already. This is a good movie for explaining them to the English speaking world.

First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win. Gandhi.

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This could have been a brilliant Spanish project had not the English speaking part of the world been so averse to reading subtitles. Does a film have to be in English for the wider world to appreciate it or even just see it? It seems somehow sad.

"We fell in love. I fell in love - she just stood there." / http://twitter.com/Marielind

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That is one of my bugbears with this type of movie actually. If you are going to have the actors speak in English, why bother with Spanish accents? Rob was a Brit, pretending to be a Spaniard, speaking English with a Spanish accent. What? Obviously not all of the actors were British, so in this case, it may be the reason the whole cast had to use an accent.

In other films though, it drives me crazy. I know it is supposed to add depth and texture when we hear the accents but it always draws me out of the movie. If I can ignore the fact that the actor I am watching is a Brit pretending to a Spaniard, then I can ignore the fact he isn't using an accent too.

'Well behaved women rarely make history'

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[deleted]

It was difficult to follow the accents at time, but my eyesight is very poor so I'm glad it wasn't subtitled, though I might have been able to muddle through following spoken Spanish, but I dunno. Pan's Labyrinth was very difficult for me to follow. I'm pretty slow, have a limited vocabulary, and am used to Puerto Rican accents.

My main linguistic beef with the film was that the ONLY word left in Spanish was maricón, and it was always uttered in Spanish, never with the English equivalent *beep* I went with a woman who speaks no Spanish at all, so virtually all homophobic lines flew right over her head, and it's this kind of flinching (God forbid we "offend" anyone by showing bigotry plainly) that ruined the film on just about every level for me. If you're going to make a movie about someone murdered in large part for being gay, you have an obligation to tell it like it is about things like that. This film just didn't have the guts to do it, which was its failure.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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I don't know why they used it, since they also used f*g*g*t (I think Bunuel uses it consistently, but he definitely yells it at the guys in the street). However it didn't ruin the movie for me. As an American, I almost feel it's a part of English now too -- like a loan word. There's nothing really coy about it to me, as Hispanic guys in America use it all the time when speaking English. The filmmakers were far from shy about showing us the dangerous homophobia of the time, so I don't know how anything went over your friend's head.

First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win. Gandhi.

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My friend is a middle aged white woman from a rural area who does not hang out with Hispanic guys and knows no Spanish whatsoever, so no, she did not know that word, and it is wrong for the filmmakers to assume an English-speaking audience would, or that it would be preferable to the English. If [email protected] was indeed used, it wasn't often compared the the frequency with which maricón was used. In any case, that is a detail of something much larger at foot in the film in general, which I have covered sufficiently elsewhere. Coyness WAS a problem, throughout.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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I'm a middle aged woman, don't hangout with hispanic guys, can't speak the language but I had no trouble figuring out what they were saying. None of the accents bothered me I could hear and understand what all the actors were saying

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I agree with your point about the film flinching away from using the relevant English word - and I find it ironic that a movie with the tagline 'No Limits' wasn't braver about this.

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I always watch my movies with the subtitles on, and in each instance maricón was translated as the 'F' word (the other 'F' word). Even had it not been, I understood.

I disagree. It's a pity that this film puts the point of view that Lorca was executed for being gay, rather than for his politics, which get short shrift in this film. True, the fact that he was gay meant that he was "terminated with extreme prejudice," although, for Lorca, it was probable that he viewed his freedom to be gay as an extension of his politics (something of a minority opinion among the socialists).

The Dadaists and Surrealists had not broken away from conventional bourgeois values sufficiently that they did not view homosexuality with contempt - Luis Buñuel and André Breton were notoriously homophobic (Breton expelled René Crevel from the Surrealists for being gay).

§« The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters. »§

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The theatre had no option for subtitles, and whether you understood or not cannot be generalized broadly. If the film is in English, and that is the only word that goes untranslated, there is a problem.

As for Lorca's politics, it is exceptionally clear from his statements on theatre that after returning from NYC/Cuba he viewed himself as an activist-artist and the battles he took on were entirely conceived as a means of desensitizing the audience and moving them in a progressive direction on the specific topics of gender and sexuality. His plan was that each play should push the envelope a bit further until "in ten years' time" his self-described "impossible play" El Publico which dealt extremely frankly with homosexuality, transsexuality, beastiality and pederasty, woul be "a big hit." Bit of an optimist there, but you get the idea.

The motivations for his assassination were very complex and mixed, and loath as I am to admit it, Dalí was pretty near the mark in his extreme denunciation of the Loyalists opportunistic gross over-simplification of the matter as purely political. However, my biggest complaint is that this very powerful and courageous man gets short-shrift in the portrayal of his post-Dalí life and work across the board. All that seems to interest the author is the "doomed gay love-story" angle between two famous artists, and reducing a great man's tragically short life to his first seriously crappy relationship is deeply disturbing to me.

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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maybe they were too preoccupied with the market to bother about the film's integrity. reminds me of the film 'gandhi'. isn't it funny how they let the 'common' people [labourers, venders, street urchin- that sort] speak the original language?

www.somewhereinblog.net/blog/tuklifiedblog

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Americans can`t read their own language.

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LMAO.

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There used to be a word for that kind of films in the early 90's when they seem to be a lot of them:

a Europudding

A film produced with funds from different European countries which mean actors from all over the place with various accents. It gives you the impression that you are never quite watching the original version with all the conflicting accents

IMO there are only two approaches that work when it comes to actors having to play characters with a different language than their own.

Either you do the Stephen Frears approach in Dangerous Liaisons, forget all about accents and for example get the American actors you have hired to use their own accents even their character are French. (Can you just imagine Glenn Close and John Malkovich doing a comedy 'allo ;allo French accent??)

Or you do a Quentin Tarantino in Inglorious Basterds and employ native speakers

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because there were english actors playing spanish characters. Easier for all of them to speak english with spanish accents.it would be difficult for the english actors to learn spanish and pick up an accent. could probably ruin their performances.
The movie had a very strong screenplay, and they could have shot it with an all spanish cast, or at least have Dali played by a Spanish actor too. Thankfully Pattinson is real good at what he does, and he didn't mess it up. But he doesn't look spanish. all pale and british as he is.

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If there's one thing this film didn't have it was a strong screenplay. In fact, it's the writing that ruined it -- everything else seemed remarkably solid for a tiny budget indie. As for Pattinson's resemblance to Dalí, I think he was close enough..

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I'm Victor Marzowicz-Velasquez and I'm here to recruit you.

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I have to disagree with you. I couldn't enjoy the movie because I was constantly distracted by Pattison's terrible Spanish accent. The actor playing Luis Buñuel did much better. Even though his accent was far from perfect, it sounded much more realistic, whereas Pattison sometimes sounded like he was trying to do a French accent.

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This is a brit-spanish production, and if you want a film that could go to festivals or be released in some countries outside from Spain, you must portrayed the film in english.

I think that the big mistake is use this mix of Spanish and British actors and try to make their accents homogeneous. The spanish accent is very strong in the natives and for a spanish ear, Pattinson and especially Matthew don't sound in any case believable in their intents to sound like a spanish speaker.

For me, the best solution in this case would be leave all the actors speak with their one accent trying to minimize it and not make the accent too notorious.

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