BRAVO!!!!


It's about time we start focusing on what REALLY caused the devistation in New Orleans!!!!!! No, this is not a blockbuster film, but you owe it to yourself to see it at an IMAX theatre. The areal shots of the Wetlands alone will take your breath away!
I hope we see many more films like this until something is done about this crisis. Let's stop pointing fingers about the emergency response following Katrina - let's look ahead at what we can do before the next one hits that area. It's obvious that the current Administration doesn't give a rat's rear about this situation. So, let's start with Congress!!! Start writing letters!!!

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That's so true!
I completely agree with you because I live down South
in Alabama & we had it bad too
but not nearly as bad as New Orleans
& all i could think of was that I don't know WHAT i'd do
if I returned home & there was none.


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The devastation in New Orleans was poor preparation. A hurricane like Katrina hits about once every 40 years, so normally Nola is spared. The levee system could only take a cat. 3. and the entire city is below sea level. Katrina didn't even directly hit New Orleans. Guess what, the current levees are hardly up to pre-Katrina standards three years later. It'll eventually happen again because the local government in that city consists of a bunch of bumbling idiots who never get anything accomplished.
That being said, I wish that films like this would stop focusing SO MUCH on Katrina and New Orleans. Our wetlands were in danger long before Katrina. Any hurricane, Tropical Storm, Tropical depression, etc. impacts our coast. Katrina and Rita actually dumped 144 million tons of new sediment onto the wetlands.
On average, Louisiana loses about 25 square miles of wetlands per year. There are things being done, though. Because LA is so vulnerable to flooding and such, we've got all kinds of spillways and levee systems that serve to avoid damaging the wetlands in the event of a flood. After Christmas, we all put out our trees on the curb and they're picked up and lined along our coast as a barrier. Truth be told, it's really prolonging the inevitable. The sea level keeps rising and they'll have to do a little more to protect communities like St. Bernard Parish, Orleans Parish, Plaquemines Parish, and other low lying areas.
We have a 14 Billion dollar plan to protect our wetlands that's been proposed. From storms to nutria to pipelines and wells, our wetlands have been treated very poorly in the past. Finally, that's beginning to change.

-Karli, Baton Rouge





http://www.slld.net/lalandloss.jpg

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