couldn't suspend my disbelief


and thats coming from a guy who just the night before watched 30 days of night and completely accepted the main character injecting himself with his dead friends blood to turn himself into a vampire to kill another vampire.

i liked the idea when i saw the trailer. i liked the acting as well. too many things though were just not plausible, even for a childrens fiction movie. thought it would be good to watch with the kids, but even they knew how implausible the whole thing was and kept giving me looks like "are you seriously gonna finish watching this movie?"

was very disappointed.

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Me too. Just too out there for me.




I asked the doctor to take your picture so I can look at you from inside as well.

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same here. very stupid movie

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That is your problem, not the movie's or anyone else's.


"The value of an idea has nothing to do with the honesty of the man expressing it."--Oscar Wilde

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Actually it's quite realistic if you accept that someone would climb onto a home-brew rocket and launch himself into space. The only reason it hasn't been done is that the FAA requires certification of all components of a manned rocket and that's very, very expensive. They've also made it quite clear than anyone trying it w/o a flight certificate would be met by US marshals when (if) he landed.

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It was an ok moive other than the two rocket launches. As someone who has been to Kennedy, there is no way that the barn or the house would have survived a lauch - something that a true aeronautical engineer would have known.

---
A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence. - David Hume

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I don't think the movie was made for those people.


"The value of an idea has nothing to do with the honesty of the man expressing it."--Oscar Wilde

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[deleted]

Yes, those of you who disbelieve...you're correct to do so.

I _AM_ a rocket engineer, having built, transported, erected, and launched Atlas rockets, which Farmer's rocket was based upon. The whole "build your own rocket" is absolutely implausible, as it took the might of the entire United States 10 years and billions of dollars to launch an Atlas successfully in the 1950's and 1960's, and in the 1990's, when I helped build and launch them, it took the full force of 40,000 engineers and technicians at General Dynamics and thousands of suppliers to get an Atlas built and launched.

Rocket fuel is a Medium Explosive. The Atlas of that time ran on highly refined kerosine (RP-1) and liquid oxygen (LOX), which are very expensive and hard to handle liquids. Regular people aren't allowe to buy this stuff, let alone could they afford it.

LOX turns anything burnable into a mini-bomb. A hydrocarbon (grease, wood, fuel, etc) soaked in LOX literally explodes if impacted, so all the LOX systems on a rocket must be completely hydrocarbon free during assembly. This means you can't clean it with any normal detergent...all cleaning and lubricating is done with flourocarbon based solvents and greases. It also means that you can't open the pipes any place where debris might enter. A barn is not a rocket assembly area.

The exhaust coming out of the engines is hotter than a blowtorch, and many times larger and more powerful. The concrete and steel of the launch pad are coated in ablative materials designed for the heat and cooled by huge sprays of water like firehoses. Even with those preps, it took 2 months to refurbish a launch pad after a launch due to blast damage.

All the structures within 1/4 mile of the launch in that movie would have been obliterated by the shock wave of sound from the engines. The heat would have scorched everything within a 100 yard radius.

I liked the acting in the movie, and there sure were some stars, but it should be classified as fantasy, because it's all impossible for one person to do.

Read more about my Atlas days here:

http://bob2000.com/rrk1.htm

Gerard Forgnone
San Diego

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That's why I passed on seeing it. I didn't know the particulars as listed above (not even close) but I have enough technical grounding to know the concept to be utterly unbelievable and so I knew I'd just be looking at nonsense on the screen when I wasn't checking my watch. (Although Virginia Madsen in it came close to changing my mind) Apparantly that was the film's major deterrent for majority of film goers as well, as this film did poorly at the box office.
Actually, one recent and vaguely similar film with a not-so-outlandish premise was Clint Eastwood's "Space Cowboys". My only complaint in that film was they didn't lay out the premise a little more clearly. But still was plausable enough to give me a good ride!

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Inability to suspend one's disbelief is an individual problem. I feel sorry for you. It's a movie.


"The value of an idea has nothing to do with the honesty of the man expressing it."--Oscar Wilde

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I would have liked it much better if the story had featured him somehow acquiring a surplus rocket that had been finished but never launched, with him simply doing the (huge amount of) pre-launch prep work. Still implausible, but I could probably stretch suspension of disbelief that far.

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probably would have gone better the route of a spacecraft more like the civilian spacecraft that launched a few years ago (ansari x prize). would that help you any?

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I can clearly see how all of you didn't get the point of the movie.

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While I greatly appreciate Mr. Gerard Forgnone's posting, I think we all need to be reminded that this movie was in no way a documentary, it was for entertainment and inspiration. The guy could have just as well always wanted to play baseball and finally got the chance, or written a best selling book. The whole point of the movie wasn't to re-create a homegrown NASA experience, it was to what it said on the rocket "The Dreamer". It's a story about a family pulling together to make a strong wish come true even though there is no financial payoff in doing so, cause that isn't the motive. It isn't about someone wanting to be a rock star because they want the fame.

Those that thought this movie was about how to build your own rocket, are mistaken what this story was really all about, "The Dreamer".

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Sure it could have been about baseball instead. But if they'd made Field Of Dreams and gotten the basic rules of baseball wrong or had the players running around the bases in the wrong direction, baseball fans would raise hell, right?

The Astronaut Farmer really did that bad a job on the rocket science. For anyone who knew much about NASA or rockets, it completely tore us out of the story, screaming and wanting to throw things at the screen.

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Launching Rockets is also a LOT more technical than baseball, so yeah, nitpicking really is not that fair. Going to space is something very ambitious, and honestly, this is the kind of movie that can inspire kids to become astronauts, even if the details are far off, that was not the point, as others have said. The point was to encourage people to pursue their dreams, even if they seem as impossible as going to space. Frankly, I would like to see more films that actively encourage people to try getting involved in science and certainly encourage people to support space exploration.

"Aw Crap!" - Hellboy

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Well, us techies who have worked around rockets or jet engines and military aircraft and such, really need some sort of mechanism to suspend disbelief before something so tech-oriented as this movie becomes believable. This movie does not provide it. Hey, we all get the 'I have a dream' thing, it's been part of American culture for nearly 50 years now. But if you're going to throw something so seriously implausible as someone launching and building an Atlas rocket from their barn at us, at least come up with some angle that anchors us to the story!

I'll give you an example: the first Matrix movie. It took a wildly implausible scenario and made it believeable, even to a techie. Hey Hollywood, throw us a bone here.

No astronautical engineer is an expert in every discipline necessary to build a rocket like that. Those are hugely complex beasts with hundreds of highly complex systems, requiring clean rooms to build, and facilities to test. The parts and supplies are highly-engineered and cannot be made in a back yard or barn. You can't just make the heat shields for re-entry. The engines require an entirely-dedicated discipline, as do the navigational electronics and life support, etc., etc..

As a previous commenter said, give us a surplus rocket or something. Give us a more legitimate launch facility. Give us something. Heck, they didn't even bother trying to dive into the 'FAA Flight Plan' scenario. There are thousands of objects whizzing around in space and you have to know exactly where they all are at every second and avoid them. You can't just say you're going to orbit the Earth one time and land. You have to plot your exact location down to the millimeter at every microsecond.

This is really just a 'Dream' movie that took on an implausible scenario, more slated for a young impressionable audience than an intelligent adult audience. Any adult that thinks this was a good movie must be lost in wonderland.

Come see a fat old man sometime!

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Suspension of disbelief is a conscious choice. I'm a musician, but I don't bitch if they have Beethoven falling in love with someone he never even met in real life or have a musician playing an instrument that hadn't been invented yet. It's a movie, an entertainment. If something is so egregiously wrong you can't let yourself suspend disbelief that's a choice too. I don't have to walk out of the theater believing it could have happened. If the movie adheres to its own interior logic, it works for me. Your last line is rather sour grapes, Big John. Looking down on someone who enjoys something you don't is as childish as you apparently think I am for liking this movie.


"The value of an idea has nothing to do with the honesty of the man expressing it."--Oscar Wilde

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You know something? I like fantasy just as much as anyone. But even that has to be believable, it has to set up some kind of a believable universe where rules are followed. I am an old sci fi reader and fan, and those authors knew how to create a world that you could immerse yourself in.

So, hey, yeah, I don't think too highly of people who could say this is good stuff! It's simply not! And to make out otherwise shows a certain lack of intelligence. There, I've said it.

Come see a fat old man sometime!

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You just disqualified yourself from further discussion. Piss off.


"The value of an idea has nothing to do with the honesty of the man expressing it."--Oscar Wilde

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I rest my case. 8-)

Come see a fat old man sometime!

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I'm a heavy reader of Sci-Fi as well, re-reading Starship Troopers right at this moment, and I enjoyed the film quite a bit. Of course the concepts was out there, but hardly as egregious as "The Core" (though I will admit, that film is a guilty pleasure for me, fun to laugh at). As others have pointed out, launching a rocket is a highly technical process, and the premise here was certainly in the fantasy realm, but it did have it's strengths, and frankly, I enjoyed the story quite a bit, and as I have stated elsewhere, found it the kind of film that might just encourage kids to try working in the field of science and space exploration, which could honestly use some more support these days.

"Aw Crap!" - Hellboy

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Well I just watched it for the first time and got so angry about it that I went to IMDB message boards to rant - something I do every once in a while when I love or hate a movie.

Then I found out IMDB has scrapped their message boards. So I'm still so hacked off about it that I eventually end up registering here, only to find that BigJohnPilgrim has said almost word-for-word what I was going to say.

Look, suspension of belief is great. I've loved films where ghost armies tackle huge mythological elephants, where replicant human beings return to earth and get hunted down by bounty hunters, and where a suicidal banker is saved by an angel trying to earn wings. But you've still got to make it believable enough that anyone with a shred of common sense can still buy it. But the amount of bad science and sheer ignorance of the reality of space travel put this film out of orbit.

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I bet they loved that vampire movie though!

Laugh.

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I accepted that he was able to build the rocket in the first place because I assumed it took him decades to get to that point. I accepted that his first launch failed because it was a homemade rocket, so of course it failed. Where I lost it is that he was able to rebuild his smashed up rocket in a month and successfully launch it into space.

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[deleted]

I'm not quite sure why people are so upset .. the film didn't claim to be based on fact or anything of the like .. TV Guide describes this film as an "uplifting and whimsical fable", that was clearly never meant to be taken as a serious based on reality movie .. for me, who grew up with the NASA spaceflight programs, it was a pure joy to watch..
~every saint has a past .. every sinner has a future~

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