Super-Strong Word of Mouth


As it should be.

Not even 10am the first day of work after opening weekend, I talk to people I work with who I think would like this, and recommend the movie, but they've already had someone else like a friend or family member tell them they had to see it.

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That's not atypical for a James Cameron film. Word of mouth went a long way for keeping most of his films in the public consciousness. In fact the studio is banking on the impact of Cameron on the Middle Kingdom (China/Asia) where he is revered. Alita isn't really a Cameron film it's a Rodriguez film but he is the face and now voice of promoting this film.

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Cameron was going to do Alita as a 2009 release but did Avatar instead because the tech was ALMOST good enough. Then Avatar was such a moneymaker that he obligated himself to sequels.

It's great that he used Avatar to push the tech first, because this is the payoff.

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Anecdotal evidence. Everyone I spoke to either didn't know what it was or "that dumb kids movie with the big eye girl".

Kinda like the response the stupid grinning from Truth or Dare got.

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Your counterpoint is meaningless... It's not indicative of negative word of mouth or anything. As you said, either they weren't aware of it yet, or had only seen something from a commercial or ad and barely paid attention to anything more than the eyes.

Besides which, this is not science. Anecdotal evidence certainly applies here because word of mouth IS an anecdotal thing.

Even the act of telling someone "I saw X movie and really enjoyed it, you would too" fits the definition of an anecdote: "A short amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person."

The feedback we have gotten is probably more indicative of the people in our circle of friends/associates/family than anything else.

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Your point is meaningless, that super strong word of mouth around your ears didnt convert to bums in seats.

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Agreed.

This seems to be another one of those films where the audience enjoys it more than the critics.

Personally, I hope it makes money in Asia. “Aquaman” was terrible and it cleaned up in China. “Alita” was a much better film.

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My first reaction was in my topic from last night about the advertising being too much "battle" and not enough "angel." The marketing really failed this movie... I'm glad I didn't expect it to be like this, because it was a surprise, but the movie being so sweet and endearing and beautiful is something that should have been pushed, because it would really put butts in seats.

I could put together a "beauty" trailer demonstrating it as a visual work of art, plus highlighting the touching, heartfelt family drama that dominates the story. It would look like a completely different movie from the ads and trailers I've seen.

The worst part about advertising the action scenes so hard is that these are visually stylized ballet-like action scenes that don't really come across in short clips, they have to be taken in as individual extended sequences... Even the violence and "kill scenes" are glorious because they show a beautiful indulgence in the destruction, something that is part of Alita's nature and which drives her to combat evil.

Beyond that, they can't be taken out of context, as EACH action scene is a specific, emotional step in Alita's development. They are her growing pains.

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It faces an uphill battle, yes, but it appears like enough audiences are embracing it.

Since most are expecting it to flop, it would be amazing if it does the complete opposite. It should. But we’ll see.

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So far I've had two reactions:

1. Those who have already had a close friend or family member urge them to see it.

2. Those who perk up when I mention it's so good, because they were interested and waiting to hear some feedback about it.

I was just telling a fellow Star Wars fanatic about it, she is going to go see it with her husband now, and all three of the other people in earshot all heard me and started asking me more about it.

Wouldn't it be nice if the second weekend was bigger than the opening?

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Wouldn't it be nice if the second weekend was bigger than the opening?



That would be incredible! I wouldn’t bet on it right now, but it’s not impossible. Besides, it did much better its opening weekend than everyone expected it to. It’d be very cool if it continues to exceed expectations.

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I'm sure Cameron is confident after Titanic and Avatar both did the same thing that this is starting to do.

People go on about the importance of opening weekends, and the drop-off from one weekend to the next.

Jim says "Hold my beer" and puts out another slow-burn juggernaut.

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Really loved the movie, and I myself spread the Word of mouth as well.

I think we all should to increase the already low odds of having a sequel in the near future (2-3 years).

The movie is decent in the story, awesome in special effects and fights and has really compelling characters which I love Alita and how is she portrayed in the film. Not sure how she portrayed in the manga, and I am waiting to see if there is a sequel before I go ahead and buy the manga. I'd like to see how they do it first on the big screen.

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Saw this last night. Loved the movie. Lots of action and emotional scenes. Too bad it’s not getting the love it should get.

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It's funny , the movie really has it's hardcore fan base and will definitely get its 400 mil worlwide from the box office. Hopefully with this fanbase set and the streaming and blu ray sales it will still get a greenlit for the sequels!
They will have to film them back to back so that part two and three will each result to a 135 mil production budget. If the sequels than at least do as well as this one, the entire trilogy will have made 1200 mil with a 435 mil budget, than it could be a very profitable trilogy!

* yes a lot of speculation but I think I have made a good point *

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