MovieChat Forums > Casino Royale (2006) Discussion > Is Casino Royale the most discarded Bond...

Is Casino Royale the most discarded Bond film in history?


Interesting observation here. Occasionally I will have a little look through the blu-rays / dvds in charity / resale shops if I am passing and they alwsys, and I mean ALWAYS, have at least one or two copies of Casino Royale on their shelves. Even if they have NO other Bond films. It's damned peculiar. It's made me laugh observing this over at least a couple of years now...

Question is why? In a fascinating piece I speculate right here, right now that it's only because people enjoyed watching it in the cinema as a one off action film with "Bond" smashing people's heads into sinks, maybe the ladies enjoyed watching him in his tiny pants stepping out the sea displaying his great big giant man tits, etc. However when they bought it to watch at home they realise that the film has zero percent rewatchability. Cutting to black and white flashbacks has nothing to make you watch it over and over again compared with union jack parachute stunts, "fill her up please", "attempting re-entry", etc. The film is emotionally dead.

Thoughts?

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The first Casino Royale movie was a satire on the James Bond films. As such, a lot of James Bond fans do not look upon it as a "true" James Bond movie.

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No. In this fascinating piece I was discussing the awful Daniel Craig inferior version.

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Daniel Craig INFERIOR? HOW DARE YOU? I challenge you to a duel - fish slapping at one pace.

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I think it has more to do with the number of DVDs that got purchased. Of the Craig era, it has the most DVD sales, which makes sense as we move into a more digital/online/streaming era. So, if that's true, everybody getting rid of their DVDs (as they downsize/embrace streaming) will jettison their copies of Casino Royale, which statistically they bought more of.

Early fans of Bond would be less likely to be accumulating DVDs of those early films, since they're getting up there in years. Meanwhile, big Bond fans who are collecting DVDs still won't be ditching them into bargain bins: they want the Sean Connery collection and they don't want to bargain bin it.

I'd also expect the cycle to go something like this: (1) see film; (2) buy DVD; (3) watch it a couple times; (4) get rid of the DVD (unless you're a film collector). So, if that's true, anybody who wasn't collecting and casually bought, say, GoldenEye already ditched it by 2002. In other words: if you time-travel back to the late 90s, there will be a lot more GoldenEye in bargain bins than Octopussy. It doesn't mean GoldenEye is worse of "less rewatchable" than the Bond where 007 goes incognito as a clown.

In short: more Casino Royale DVDs sold than any other of this era and bargain bins have the films of the recent past. Anybody who still has a Bond DVD from a previous era likely has it because they sought it out, not because it was the "it" movie for a few months (which is when a lot of DVDs get sold: immediately after release).

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Kind of the height of the DVD boom in general. That's back when everybody was still building huge dvd collections. I bet if you examined the year of release of all the dvds in the resale bins, you'd find a very distinct curve with the peak lining up with the early 2000s.

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That's pretty astute.

I agree with the OP that there DO seem to be a lot of Casino Royale DVDs in thrift shops, bargain bins, etc.

But, I think you're correct in your explanation.

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Yes, but while downsizing CR was the only Bond DVD I got rid of. Why? Watching it a second time made me decide not to watch it a third time.

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Sure. That's you, though.

I've got the DVD and I love it and have no plans to chuck it.

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It's interesting you say that. I was impressed the first time I watched it shortly after its release. A year or two later I saw it at Best Buy at a really good price and quickly grabbed it. That was nearly 10 years ago and I do believe it's still in the wrapper. There was a lot of excitement in the film and it was a fresh way to continue the franchise, but I think Craig wore out his welcome very quickly. I just don't have the desire to see him, really. I miss having the tall suave guy with the dark hair as Bond and I miss some of the lightheartedness. Even the Dalton films which many have deemed too serious had a lot more fun than the Craig ones.

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