MovieChat Forums > Journey to the Center of the Earth (2008) Discussion > It's Spelt: C E N T R E !!!!!!!!!!!!!!...

It's Spelt: C E N T R E !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Nuf said !!!!!!!!!!!!

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It's spelled ENOUGH.




The world meets nobody halfway

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Actually, you can spell it center or centre.
At least have the decency to spell out enough.




I'll join you when hell freezes over.
Dumbledore's Army!

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Yeah, I am pretty sure that most people spell it: C-E-N-T-E-R. I have spelled it that way my whole life, unless it is contextual of course.

Last Movies seen:
Wall*E - 10/10
Get Smart - 8/10


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The advert I saw in the UK spelt it both ways. Centre at the bottom of the screen and center in the main title. So you can't blame people for getting it wrong.

Bela Lugosi: Bullsh*t! I'm ready now! Roll the camera!

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As far as i'm aware the original spelling is CENTRE used in England for a few hundred years. CENTER is the Americanised way of spelling it which I think came later on.













Journey To The Center of the Earth 3D sounds like a complete insult to Jules Verne!

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just like its spelt "theatre" but we're american. we're in america.

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No we're not.

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Please ignore the more ignorant Americans.

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Or the Brits doing bad American imitations.

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That would be quite a stretch, I think.

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Senturr.

Always remember to wear a helmet when caving, and carry three light sources

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I believe "spelt" is correctly "spelt" as spelled. :)

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splelngi itsn ipmotantr aynyaw, poelpe.

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If I drop my "H"s, and say "oy" instead of I, will that give me a British accent?

'ello love, 'ow's things wit' you?

You know oim doin' fine 'on, 'ave yourself a pint at the pub

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[deleted]

[deleted]

or brits doing austrian immitations.

G'Day Mate! lets put another.......Shhrimp on the barbay!
*dumb n dumber for the slow ones*

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Make that Australian.

And for your information, the line you just gave about the shrimp on the barbay was also Americanised.

We actually say it as follows:

G'day, mate. Put another prawn on the barbee.

"Without pain, life has no meaning."

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The quote was from the movie Dumb and Dumber...where it was meant to be Americanized. And dumb.

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Actually, this quote was from an Australian tourism advertisement run in the US in the 1980s. It was fronted by Paul Hogan (Crocodile Dundee). The movie Dumb and Dumber used the advertisement caused it to be associated with Australia.

And, yes, 'Center' is US spelling, 'Centre' is British/Australian. Likewise Color/Colour and a host of others.

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[deleted]

lol - i'm austrian and was like "what the hell is he talking about?" until i read your reply...

it always amazes me how people confuse a small country with a continent. i guess it's alright to not know where austria actually is (as long as you don't live in europe...) but people should at least know the names of the earth's continents? o_O

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<<<it always amazes me how people confuse a small country with a continent. i guess it's alright to not know where austria actually is (as long as you don't live in europe...) but people should at least know the names of the earth's continents? o_O

watch the movie with Yahoo Serious starring as Albert Einstein.

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god, are you serious?
Austria & Australia --> You can't tell the difference?

N~M~N#213
I~E#43
O~D#49
TA#102
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=mG9tiaY-2Qo

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god, are you serious?
Austria & Australia --> You can't tell the difference?



Well they are americans after all.....

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<<<are you serious?
Austria & Australia --> You can't tell the difference?

movie: "Young Einstein" starring "Yahoo Serious".

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<<<or brits doing austrian immitations.

<<<G'Day Mate! lets put another.......Shhrimp on the barbay!
*dumb n dumber for the slow ones*

you very obviously must be one of the people who thought it was a true storyline in the movie where Yahoo Serious stars as Albert Einstein who it is discovered to actually be Australian and only mistaken as Austrian.



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Now I must say it is really funny when a Greek is needed to explain the differences between British English and US English, but it would be worth going to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_English in order to find out that both spellings are correct, depending on which side of the Atlantic you live in.

Thanks :)

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I'm surprised it took to page 2 for someone to clearly state that both spellings are correct, it just depends if you are from America or the UK.

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<<<in order to find out that both spellings are correct, depending on which side of the Atlantic you live in.

not according to my racist American public-school teachers.

They have state that ONLY the American spelling is correct, NO MATTER WHAT, EVEN WHEN quoting British articles in British publications and even when they are proper names", despite their self-contradictory earlier statements about proper names and quotes must always be spelled exactly the way they are in the originals.

owever, when it actually came down to it and they marked my assignment wrong for it, and even after I explained to them it was the British spellings quoted from a British source and I was simply doing it the way they theirselves said to, then they changed their tune and made the racist statemets I mentioned above.

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can ya'll remove dem dar poles from ye tailpipes.
Crikey.

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And please ignore the typical we're-smarter-better-and-overall-greater-than-thou Brits.

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You don't see too many of those guys. Usually it's arrogant Uh-mer-icuns.

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"You don't see too many of those guys. Usually it's arrogant Uh-mer-icuns."

From my experience on the imdb boards, idiots trying to bash America for incredibly ridiculous reasons are pretty common. I don't know how many of them are Brits, though.

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Nothing ridiculous in this case, however. Some genius American was attacking the fact that Brits spell center as "centre", and was unfortunately too ignorant to know that is perfectly correct. I think what you're reading here is just the backlash from that stupid initial attack.

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"And please ignore the typical we're-smarter-better-and-overall-greater-than-thou Brits."

Why ignore them when I can flame them? :P

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this is an american movie so they spelled it the american way, as soon as england makes a movie americans want to see they can spell the title however they want

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bigtopne wrote:

this is an american movie so they spelled it the american way, as soon as england makes a movie americans want to see they can spell the title however they want



What you're saying makes no sense whatsoever. Just because some American dolt doesn't understand that different parts of the world spell words differently doesn't have anything to do with the fact that this is an American movie. The guy criticized something he knows nothing about, much like yourself.

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oooooo your a jackass

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bigtopne wrote:
oooooo your a jackass


You and the other guy should take a grade school spelling class together.

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ha ha ha you are so funny.

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Reply to Bigtopne:

Ha ha, you're out of comebacks.

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Unless it's Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.

Darren Lamb (to Warwick Davis): 'Could I fit in your house?'

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this is an american movie so they spelled it the american way, as soon as england makes a movie americans want to see they can spell the title however they want




People who don't like their beliefs being laughed at shouldn't have such funny beliefs

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it's hard to ignore so many people...

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when will people realize that not only the U,S, has internet?

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exactly then when people will realize that an american-produced film should have american spelling.

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This is an American made movie. We're not gonna spell it Centre when we spell it Center.
when will people realize the biggest movies comes from us.

"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here. This is the War Room."
"You jump, I jump, right?"

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Ya, because people are oblivious to that little fact...



"Jeffery Dahmer, eat your heart out!"

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actually that would be Bollywood in India

--------------------------
Posting and You: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9q2jNjOPdk

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Honestly is there really a need to drop a line like that? You produce the most movies because you are a larger country with a larger population that recieves more money than most other's because of it, but when you want to get b!tchy, have you noticed how America tends to take the few good things that we produce and make it their own? Need an example, genius? James Bond... Harry Potter... 28 Days Later. If you are so fantastic at coming out with the biggest movies (most of which have acomplaces from different parts of the globe, eg writers, editers, cameramen) then why do you feel the need to steal from us? Talk about trying to rob England of the little victory we get, that's not sportsmanship, it's just pathetic. =P

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[deleted]

What!? Get off our interwebz you damn foreigners!!!

LOL

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Ok, not taking spelling lessons from people who can't spell spelled!!!!!!! Spelt is a grain, made into a flour people. Centre is one of those words that is spelled differently in different parts of the world. Get over it.

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In Canada it is spelled centre. In America it is spelled center. Another spelling variation is licence (Canada) and license (America).

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I am Canadian and i could not find this board as I was searching for 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' which only brings up a tv movie from 1975. I had to search Brendan Fraser then go from there to get on this board - which I am kind of embarrassed about as I live near the Can/US board and am used to the fact that the spelling of many words is diffenent in the 2 countries (colour/color). Too many examples to list!

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[deleted]

Actually spelled can be written "spelt" as well.

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Tell that to Merriam-Webster--
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spelt

However, it is used as the past particle of "spell" in Britain.

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well done mate , if you take a good look at the link you provided you will see it lists both definitions .
you've managed to disprove your own statement and confirm your lack of intelligence .

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Ahhh..in Britain. Interesting, but not quite interesting enough for me to really give a damn.

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However, it is used as the past particle of "spell" in Britain.

You mean past 'participle', not particle.

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I don't think so ...tell me what dictionary you looked in. Are you an expert in languages? Please explain as I would really like to know. If I am wrong I will gladly admit it, as I am always trying to learn to things.

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http://www.askoxford.com/

Look up "spell" - make sure you've selected the 'UK' view for British English entries. "Spelt" is perfectly fine. And "center" is NOT acceptable in British English. Full stop.

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"Spelt is a grain, made into a flour people"

You know, using correct punctuation is just as important as spelling words correctly. "Made into a flour people" means you make a new kind of race of people out of flour; much like the Potato People.

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Haha!

Darren Lamb (to Warwick Davis): 'Could I fit in your house?'

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spelt: Meaning 1, past and past participle of spell. The spelling "spelt" is chiefly British. The rest of the world uses the variant spelling, "spelled."

spelt: Meaning 2, noun an old kind of wheat with bearded ears and spikelets that each contain two narrow grains, eaten as a health food. [Triticum spelta.] ORIGIN: Old English, from Old Saxon spelta.

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[deleted]

Do American keyboards also not have a shift key for capitalisation?

On the original subject, the problem is not that the film's spelling is "center" - but that they haven't varied the spelling and title for the different markets (or at least this one), presumably to save a few quid (and approximately twice as many dollars) and increase profitability - but at what cost?

I see this as a cheapening and dumbing down - and in this case, dumbing down is an all too real problem, because the spelling of "center" could influence those who see it in the UK - and I wouldn't mind so much if it wasn't for the fact that this is a PG and impressionable children will be taken to see it by their parents.

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This film has to save a buck or two where it can. It had tons of problems during production and lost a huge amount of money. Secondly, you can't clear up for your children that different countries sometimes spell things differently? It's a spelling difference.... who cares?
I can't believe this thread is so long

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The problem is: if the film company can't respect us enough to change a couple of letters around, in order to save a couple of dollars (which is about how much a change like that would cost), why should we respect it enough to spend any money on tickets? The loss-making just seems self-evident – the marketing for this film appears very cheap, and the American spelling (outside America) adds to that.

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But that's the point we Americans, want the whole world to spell things our way. That's why we changed spellings of words when we formed our country....lol... In all seriousness though, I find it ridiculous how long this thread is, and people argue about this.

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South America?

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SamanthaThePolarBear:
"but we're american. we're in america."

Newsflash: the www in www.imdb.com stands for World Wide Web.

"The early bird catches the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese."

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News Flash: It's called "The Internet", we own it. We made up a few .uk type suffixes for you guys to have, but .com means .USA. So, eat my .html.

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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Oh eat YOUR HTML?
Actually... HTML was created by two people, neither of them American and actually, one of them English. Lovely.

It's a very hard thing to own the internet too...

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We're not talking about "HTML"... we're talking about the Internet, and you are surfing on our Internet. So, be good. Show a little gratitude.

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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News Flash: It's called "The Internet", we own it. We made up a few .uk type suffixes for you guys to have, but .com means .USA. So, eat my .html.

We're not talking about "HTML"... we're talking about the Internet, and you are surfing on our Internet. So, be good. Show a little gratitude.

What on earth makes you think it's *your* internet ?!

As has already been pointed out, neither of the people who invented the internet was an American. The US has invested a lot of money in its own use of the thing, but that hardly entitles the US to claim ownership.

And despite your wild allegation, ".com" does *not* mean ".USA". ".com" is a top-level domain, meant to represent commercial websites. The US was originally supposed to have a country suffix as well, but in a demonstration of its typical "one rule for us and a different rule for everyone else" arrogance and self-interest, refused to use the .us suffix. Real helpful. And since tyhen, the US has also completely degraded the .com domain and muddied the waters (typically, refusing to abide by the conventions themselves, while still insisting that everyone else does) by letting just anyone use that domain, whether commercial bodies or not. The US didn't invent the thing, but it's certainly gone a long way towards breaking it.

There's absolutely zero reason that any of us should "show a little gratitude" to the US in this.


You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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As has already been pointed out, neither of the people who invented the internet was an American

I love it when people show their ignorance in public like that. Sigh, here we go, havin' to educate these fools.

First of all, the Internet is NOT the World Wide Web! Try to open that head and learn something.

From Wikipedia:
However, the Internet and the World Wide Web are not one and the same. The Internet is the global data communications backbone, i.e., the hardware and software infrastructure, that provides connectivity between resources or services and the users of such facilities. In contrast, the Web is one of the services communicated via the Internet. It is a collection of interconnected documents and other resources, linked by symbolic hyperlinks and URLs.


Now, on to who created THE INTERNET (the USA) and how it was created:

...spurred the United States to create the Advanced Research Projects Agency, known as ARPA, in February 1958 to regain a technological lead. ARPA created the Information Processing Technology Office (IPTO) to further the research of the Semi Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) program, which had networked country-wide radar systems together for the first time....

The first TCP/IP-wide area network was made operational by January 1, 1983 when all hosts on the ARPANET were switched over from the older NCP protocols to TCP/IP. In 1985, the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned the construction of a university 56 kilobit/second network backbone using computers called "fuzzballs" by their inventor, David L. Mills. The following year, NSF sponsored the development of a higher-speed 1.5 megabit/second backbone that became the NSFNet. A key decision to use the DARPA TCP/IP protocols was made by Dennis Jennings, then in charge of the Supercomputer program at NSF.


So, like I said, when you use our Internet, show a little gratitude, punk.

The next time you want to spout off stupid inanities, think twice, unless you like being made a fool of in public.

The USA created the Internet, show some gratitude!

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

PS If you can't tell that 95% of this is tongue-in-cheek, then you need to catch a clue.

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Wow, what an articulate reply. So temperate, so intelligent.

You have your little poo-throwing spat, and then try to pretend it's a joke to cover yourself, and then even try to turn that into another attempt at an insult.

You need to up your meds, buddy.


You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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Oops, someone doesn't take correction well.

I think you need to up your humility, "buddy".

Next time, just say, "Ok, I was wrong, sorry daddy."

Oh, and... Eat Sh!t

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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Oh, that's just sad, Bladerunner. How pathetic.

I hear running is very good for handling uncontrolled aggression.



You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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You know, all your supercilious and condescending chastisement only serves to expose your own passive aggressiveness. I think you need to worry about your *own* "uncontrolled aggression". I hear admitting your shortcomings is the first step to overcoming them. Try that, then comment.

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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It's called "projection", Bladerunner. You're doing quite a lot of it.


You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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It's called "psychotropic medication", Hurl-a-Berl, try it. You need a lot of it.

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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And again, he comes in swinging and misses. You are being utterly tragic in your determination to say anything to give offence.
What on earth is your problem ?

Actually, don't bother; I don't give a toss what your problem is. You're just a troll with anger management issues, Bladerunner. You rode in here full of high-handed insults, and now you're just sulking like a baby because I didn't get all hurt and knuckle under.

I've wasted enough time on you. Welcome to Ignore, baby.



You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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What a moron, you come in tossing around your passive-aggressive pop-psyche conclusions, and you blame ME for having your litany of DSM-IIIR disorders. HAHA. I didn't get "hurt" or "knuckle under", no matter how much you want that to have happened.

You got smacked down yammering about Berners-Lee creating the *Internet* HAHA, and then you didn't admit your error, instead you just started (very poorly) psychoanalyzing me because you had NO other response. And you accuse ME of aggression.

You said a mouthful when you said I've wasted enough time on you. I don't put people on "ignore", but then I don't get "hurt" and "knuckle under" like you did either.

You might very well think about your comments and then... sit on them.


"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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I like the way you coped the link but missed the first part which said RUSSIA spurred on.

Plus the point it made:


Although the basic applications and guidelines that make the Internet possible had existed for almost a decade, the network did not gain a public face until the 1990s. On August 6, 1991, CERN, which straddles the border between France and Switzerland, publicized the new World Wide Web project. The Web was invented by ENGLISH scientist Tim Berners-Lee in 1989.

An early popular web browser was ViolaWWW, based upon HyperCard....

Plus What's with British English And American English. It's Both English which Would you Believe comes from England

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I like the way you coped the link but missed the first part which said RUSSIA spurred on.

I didn't "miss" that, it didn't make any difference. The competition between the US and the Soviet Union only hastened the creation, it had no hand in the science or the need. The point is, the United States created the Internet, just as I said.

The Internet was a HUGE thing before the WWW! I used it. Newsgroups, email, telnet, you name it. Universities, businesses, the government and private individuals (those with access) used the Internet.

Berners-Lee created the web interface (the server and application), which is simply a front end used to present info and files to the end user, it rides ON the Internet. Without the Internet it would be almost useless (except for Intranets and P2P applications). Files and information were traded just as effectively before the WWW, it just made it MUCH more elegant, easy, intuitive and user friendly (and that's a LOT).

By the way, Berners-Lee lives in America, in Lexington, Massachusetts (USA) with his American wife, Nancy, and two American children, Alice and Ben.

None of us who live here are "from" the U.S. We're all from somewhere else (at some point in our ancestry... my people came here from a small farming community in Germany in 1878). In my opinion it is this fact that makes us *strong*. We are a nation of people who came looking for freedom and opportunity, bringing with us our unique talents, gifts and strength. Obviously, now Tim is one of those people and we welcome him with open arms (even if he hadn't created WWW).

"...nothing is left of me, each time I see her..." - Catullus

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English comes mainly from Germany and Scnadanavia (mix in a bunch of Latin and French, too). If Germanic tribes never invaded England, the "English" speaking world would be speaking Celtic.

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I was actually talking about the "eat my HTML..." quote...

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[deleted]

Uh..hello!! "spelt" is NOT a word. The word you want is "spelled". Wow...what are you guys, a bunch of high school drop outs? Or elementary school drop outs??

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Yeah, kind of like honor or honour, or color or colour. Here in Canada it's honour, colour and centre. We follow the old ways.

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As any Canadian fan of Zed Zed Top will attest.

Yes, we have noble llamas.

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It's a little different, obviously, when it's the name of a band or something :-P

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I've never allowed the obvious to interfere with spewing out inferior one-liners.

Yes, we have noble llamas.

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Are you seriously pissed because they didn't spell it in the way you are used to?

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[deleted]

OK, but howcome the Brits pronounce "lieutenant" as "left tennant"?

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OP: I agree.

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I'm british and I've never said it like that. It just sounds ridiculous.

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close, but it is actually leh tennant

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Because if they clone the actor playing the 10th regeneration of Doctor Who, they'll need to refer to which David Tennant is on the right, and which one is on the left?

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OK, but howcome the Brits pronounce "lieutenant" as "left tennant"?

Because of where the word comes from.

Originally, at the time the word first came into English, the first syllable was "lief" or "liev" -- a word that appears in archaic phrases in British English as a preferred course of action ("I'd as lief go tomorrow") and is related to the more modern English word "leave" meaning permission (as in, "The judge gave him leave to appeal"). In British English (and Australian, New Zealand, Indian, African ... I'm not certain about Canadian), the pronunciation of "leff-tenant" remains, even though the spelling has changed.

The more recent pronunciation, as used in the US, is based at least in part on a misunderstanding of the word and its origins. By the time of the original British colonies in the US, the spelling had changed from "liev" to "lieu" (since in many cases "v" and "u" were effectively the same letter), and the American pronunciation followed the pronunciation of the letters "lieu" as they appear in other contexts (as in, "The fisherman gave me fish in lieu of cash to settle his debt"). It's not wrong, obviously, but this pronunciation doesn't actually reflect the meaning or origins of the word.

The British pronunciation does actually make sense, when you know the story behind it.


You might very well think that. I couldn't possibly comment.

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"England and America are two countries separated by a common language." - George Bernard Shaw

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by - jim47-1 on Thu Jul 3 2008 06:38:16

"England and America are two countries separated by a common language." - George Bernard Shaw



WELL SAID

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It's spelt either way, in America we don't spell Color with a U, ie; COLOUR.

But again, both spellings are correct, it really depends on the local preference.

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CENTER is the Americanised--WHICH IS, IN FACT, THE BETTER WAY. Millions of English felt about it so baddly, they anexed themselves from the crown and started a new goverment, banking system and dropped all the unwanted letters in words their idiot parnet-countries couldnt pronounce. "The loif of the woif was ended by the knoif"--cockney.

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It's not a FACT that it's a better way - it's just your OPINION!

Just like it is your preference to be lazy when it comes to spelling words in general - such as badly, annexed, government and couldn't.

And as far as I am aware they are all spelt the same in England, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and every other English speaking country.

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I'm pretty sure quincytrojan was kidding. (That's a Family Guy reference in the last line.)

Really though, I wouldn't want to live under the tyranny of putting Us after my Os either! ;)

I'm waiting for this board to turn into all-out U.S. vs. England war. Oh so pointless.

...Because we already won that a couple hundred years ago.


Just kidding just kidding! :)

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I'm pretty sure that CENTRE was adopted from French back in the day and evolved to CENTER, which actually means a point within a circle or sphere, at equal distance from the circumference or surface :)

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[deleted]

In Csnada we spell it Centre.

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"In Csnada we spell it Centre."

Do you also spell "Canada" as "Csnada" or is that a typo?

:D

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…and the English way is closer to the millenia-old "kentron" ;)

--
I speak England very best.

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…and the English way is closer to the millenia-old "kentron" ;)

--
I speak England very best.

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…and the English way is closer to the millenia-old "kentron" ;)

--
I speak England very best.

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as far as i'm aware the use of 'er' ie center, meter, and whatnot is an americanised version of centre, metre, the original versions from english language. we use centre and metre in australia and in msot other british colonies too. however due to the increasing americanisation of the world, the 'center' version is becoming increasingly acceptable and therefore correct

Sweets, you couldn't ignore me if you tried.

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It's not wrong. The movie was made by Hollywood, in the USA, not "U,S," by the way, therefore they use the American English for the title. If it is made in Japan, they'll probably use American English and Japanese for the title.

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Actually, the USA only paid to have it made. It was actually made in Iceland and Quebec, CANADA, eh!

But still, it's being released by an American studio, so I see the point people are trying to make, but I just don't care about it that much. I only respond on this thread cause I was suprised at how big it has grown just over a unimportant cultural spelling difference.

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If Americans want to spell it SENTUR I really don't give a toss.

The point is, if it is shown in UK, it should have English spelling, not American. They change the name for other European countries, so why not us? I don't want Pearl Harbor or the Color Purple. American English is insidious and taking over real English. If they can't use our language in our country, don't show your films.

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Yeah, I am pretty sure that most people spell it: C-E-N-T-E-R.


I am pretty sure you're wrong. I am pretty sure the original spelling, C-E-N-T-R-E is correct, and that it's spelled C-O-L-O-U-R, H-O-N-O-U-R, and F-A-V-O-U-R-I-T-E.
British/Canadian English ftw!

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I am pretty sure you're wrong.


I'm pretty sure I don't care.

Last Movies seen:
Wall*E - 10/10
Get Smart - 8/10


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What the HELL does it matter????? Noone here wrote, directed or stared in the film. I don't care how the writer CHOSE to spell a word in HIS title. Get over it and either enjoy the film or don't. Who cares? It CAN be spelled either way. You can only pick one for a title. 50-50 shot that you get what you want!

Courage is not the absence of fear. It is acting in spite of it.

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[deleted]

As many of you will already know the United Kingdom and the USA spell many words slightly differently for example ''I wrote a check''=USA -- ''I wrote a cheque''=UK.
This is just another one of those occasions. Come on you must be smarter than this dude. thank you.

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I think the word you should be concerned with is "spelt". I think that should be "spelled" . I don't think there is an actual word "spelt" That would be slang. Just my opinion, I could be wrong.

Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

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You are. Not sure about the UK but in Canada spelt is just as acceptable as spelled and it isn't slang.

--------------------------
Posting and You: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9q2jNjOPdk

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Erm...no...300 million people spell it "center".
1.1 billion spell it "centre".

---at least, that's what the voices told me...

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[deleted]

By the by..."ye" in "ye olde" is a misunderstanding. No one ever said, "ye". When typesetting first came about, it lacked the letter "þ" (which is Old English for "th"). However, they needed to symbolize the "th" sound, so they took "y" which looked similar to "thorn".

---at least, that's what the voices told me...

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Actually the tale takes place in Iceland so should be something like:
a ferð til the sent af the jörð

Since the original text was written in French, it could be:
une voyage aux centre de les terre
so center should be "spelt" centre.

I believe it all depends on what audience it is translated for. If it's made for an American audience it should not pretend to be "continental" by spelting a few words in a continental fashion.

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You must be american then. The American spelling is Center, the rest of the world spells it Centre. Centre was the originial spelling and for some reason american's changed it. Just like Favour, Colour, Neighbour. etc etc.

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The British spelling is Centre, I'm 100% american and even I know that

"Heaven isn't just a place you go when you die...it's the moment in life you acutally feel alive!"

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I know the British spelling is "centre"....that doesn't mean I have to use it.

Last Movies seen:
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The Strangers - 7/10

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No one is wrong, we just both spell it differently.....big deal.

Last Movies seen:
The Day the Earth Stood Still - 6/10
Bolt - 9/10

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What about ENTER ? How do you spell that? entre?

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This thread is the funniest thing I've seen on IMDB in a long time. I even found a new signature here.

This thread is stupid and must be stopped now.

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Perhaps we should stick to what Jules Verne intended 'Voyage au centre de la Terre'.

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Well if you can spell it center then you can spell enough as enuff.

If you are speaking English as a language, it is centre.
It can't be either way. It just has one spelling, the correct one.

You could spell cat with a "k". It would read the same, but it would just be bad English.

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Both spellings are right, lets get over it please, it's so childish to keep arguing over this right. So, did anyone like the movie? I thought It had it's moments.

Dean Winchester: I'm amazing. I'm Batman

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HA!

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no, i'm pretty sure it's spelled SHUT UP

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OK, shut up
That's the french way of spelling Center

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English language was influenced by the French following the Norman Invasion; so of course it will show French roots, as it does Germanic, Norse, Latin, and a multitude of other languages, however, Centre is just as English as Big Ben or HMS Victory... Jules Verne used Centre so why shouldn't we, hell, I lived in an apartment complex for two years in college and the developer called it The Centre so it would sound more pristine and expensive, it's really just a way we Americans spice up or down our crap.

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Center = American
Centre = English

So god knows why the adverts in the UK spell it 'Center' instead of 'Centre'.

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the adverts in the UK spell it "Center" in the title because it is spelled that way in the "official" title....but since the rest of the adverts are geared towards the UK they spell it "centre" since that is how they spell it there....

btw....I am an American who happens to use the spellings of centre, colour, harbour, theatre, and various others words like them....but that could just be because I have WAY TOO many friends that are Canadian hockey players....you get used to spelling it one way and it is hard to change back....


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Too bad they didn't spell it "middle". Or is it spelled "middel" somewhere? LOL.

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It's spelled "spelled" not spelt!!!

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Finally. Thanks timberlax. I skimmed through all of these posts to see if SOMEONE pointed that out, lol. *Spelt* is a grain. The proper term should be *spelled*. Sheeesh.

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You are wrong. 'Spelt' is the irregular form (verb) of the word 'spelling' and is completely acceptable in the English language. However, in the American language it is not used, probably because it is too much for the poor American brain to cope with.....which may explain why you drop letters from a shed load of words to make it easier for you lot to spell (e.g. 'hemaglobin' instead of 'hAemoglobin'; 'fetus' instead of 'fOetus'; 'cesium' instead of 'cAesium'; 'estrogen' instead of 'Oestrogen'; 'check' instead of 'cheQUE'; 'draft' instead of 'draUGHt'). BTW, answering the initial query......the title of Jules Verne's book was 'Voyage au centre de la terre', however, since it is translated then it depends if you translate it into American or English so, therefore, it's 'center' or 'centre'.

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I'm sorry, my poor American brain has more pressing concerns than regional dialect and spelling to deal with. I'll leave you to your training to be a contestant in "Upper Class Twit of the Year."

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darran cronshaw, you're a stupid douchebag. Changing a couple letters doesn't make anything "easier to spell", in the first place. And words like estrogen, fetus, hemoglobin, etc. are scientific terms that are not limited to America.

Anyway, how ignorant and discriminatory do you have to be to hate every person in another country for no reason? You're sick. I would never generalize (OOPS, I MEAN GENERALISE... my American brain is so poor!) all Brits to be idiots, though I can tell you I've met very stupid ones before... As well as intelligent ones.

I can tell you fall into the former category, as you seem unaware that American spelling isn't identical to English because England wasn't our only influence. Do you think you were the only ones to settle over here? Take a history class.

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At least we saved your asses in WWII.

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"At least we saved your asses in WWII."

I wouldn't characterize it as such. The US was going to have to stand against Hitler at some point. There was more at stake in WWII than Europe.

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Mate, you need to learn some history. You were over 2 years late entering the war, the British (plus a number of Commonwealth) pilots had already won the Battle of Britain and prevented Hitler invading us in the near future without air superiority. This is highlighted with the Germans having to cancel/postpone Operation Sea Lion. The last major attack on Britain was in May 1941....still months before the Japanese took the piss. Also, Hitler was initially reluctant to go to war against the British and tried on a number of occasions to persuade us not to fight against Germany....in the end we decided to honour our word with Poland. The Americans undoubtably brought a hastening to the end of the war but whether you 'saved our asses' is another thing. BTW, maybe you should try to learn to save your own asses because you seemed to have lost that ability in the last half century.

BTW, are you telling me that 'draft' is not easier to spell than 'draught' and 'omelette' is as simple as 'omelet'?

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sheesh away , it only makes you look ridiculous as spelt is also correct .

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Finally. Thanks timberlax. I skimmed through all of these posts to see if SOMEONE pointed that out, lol. *Spelt* is a grain. The proper term should be *spelled*. Sheeesh.

No, 'spelled' is American. 'spelt' is British. Like learnt, dreamt, etc. Go look it up if you don't believe me.

----
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Yeah, you fhucking Yank Bastards have got TONS to answer for, not least for the mutilation of our noble language. At least the Canadians have it right!

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Mutilation, then why don't you go down to Cornwall and slap some of the Cornish for mutilating our 'noble language' in your very own backyard. At least it took an ocean and thousands of miles of countryside for our Americanized version to show a difference (not to mention a melting pot of languages that have influenced AM. English over the past 200 years).

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...or should I say disorienting?

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This thread proves once again that the british are the stupidest *beep* ing race on earth, followed closely by the "just watch us vote for bush for a third term" dumb yanks!

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No way. Americans didn't dumb down the language to understand it better.

Just like kicking your @$$ in the Revolutionary War and running our horse races counter clockwise, we changed the language to spite you nasty teeth, kidney pie eating, warm beer drinking, pretentious limeys.

Ever heard of Independence Day? Its when we celebrate not being British.

Really if we were collectively that dumb then we wouldn't have been able to save your butts in WWII. You're welcome.

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I love this reply, Drewbacca.

You are right Americans didn't "dumb down" the language to understand it better although that was part of the reason. Another part of the reason was to demonstrate independence( via the publicaton of the webster dictionary) from the British as you state later in your post.

Regarding "kicking ass in the revolutionary war"(sic), many countries eventually left the British empire including India. Americans did it for various reasons as you know from the history taught in your schools.

Its expensive and costly in terms of lives etc running a war overseas as America now knows from its experiences in Vietnam and Iraq.
This plus a mad king, incompetent generals, a British army that would rather be at home and significant help from the French were all factors in an American victory. One that is rightly celebrated. Bloody colonials. :)

Having said, heres a funny quote from an old US sitcom. "...oh sure if we won the war how come we speak English"

Some British people like kidney pie, as its a filling and very tasty dish when made correctly, which can warm the heart during long and depressing winters.

Warm beer isn't actually warm but served at room temperature or slightly chilled to allow the drinker to appreciate the taste. If it is served ice cold then the taste is lost to the cold.

Many beers are also served cold particularly those where the taste is not that good or non existant. eg Budwieser (sorry)

Limeys are not really pretentous but have a self depreciating sense of humour that is mostly turned on themselves but when turned on others who are not used to it may be perceived as offensive or pretentious.

WWII was being fought by the British when America joined the fray. The British essentially during course of the war sacrificed everything. This included lives, wealth, secrets (such as radar) because it stood up against facism and Germany gaining more power in Europe. In the process the war began/confimed the loss of an empire and the change of power to the new world (the US)
America had to be begged to enter the war and made the uk pay through the nose for the privilege. Britain is rightly proud of its stance in the war which started in 1939 not 1941 and is grateful for the American intervention.

Yes everyone has heard of independence day. Its when Will Smith saved the world from Aliens. Now thats what I call a close encounter.

PS Center to the journey of the Earth sounds like a good simple family film and I don't care how it is spelt. Hope you enjoy it.
I imagine that original poster doesn't either and just wanted to get reactions, which he has succeeded in doing.

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Thanks for your reply Billymarr. I do think there are quite a few idiots here in the USA, but I also think the same about everywhere else on the planet.

I just got tired of everyone always bashing the "stupid Americans" like we are collectively idiots. There are stupid people EVERYWHERE. Just because we are one of the biggest and most prolific nations in the world, you just see more of it because we also have freedom of the press. Press which has the freedom to hate the government and tell the world about it in their own biased way.

Sorry, didn't mean to offend the "British" (certainly seems like it though). Thanks for clearing some things up about limeys and kidney pie.

As far as beer goes, I hate anything that is labeled "domestic" here in the USA (i.e. Budweiser, Coors, Miller, etc.) I only go with microbrew stuff like Sam Adams, or local to Texas favorite Shiner Bock. I've tried it room temperature and didn't care too much for it. I'll continue to drink it cold.

Oh yeah, I took World History at a private university that also is free to teach what they want even if they don't like the US government and I know that WWII started before we joined it. All Americans aren't myopic.

As a matter of fact, if it weren't for Americans then you would not have:

Refrigerators
Safe elevators
Burgler alarms
Tumbler locks
Football
Motorcycles
Baseball
Toilet Paper
the Subway
Blue Jeans
Telephone
Cash Register
Hearing Aid
Electric Fan
Electric Iron
Electricity altogether
Fountain Pan
Skyscraper
Escalator
Tractor
Zipper

I haven't even made it to the 1900s yet. Sure there are many things that were invented in other countries by people of other nationalities, but one thing remains; Americans are just like the rest of the world. Some strong, some weak, some smart, some stupid, some pretty, some ugly, some nice, some mean. Don't judge us by what you see on TV. We don't judge English people based on Benny Hill and David Brent.


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LOL Skimming your least and there are at least two items on it that were invented by Canadians, not Americans. (zipper and telephone).

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Well, we can count the Canadian that "invented" the zipper if we forget about the first 60 years of zipper history. While it is true that a Canadian came up with the design that is used today, he did not invent the zipper.

Not sure which inventor of the phone you are talking about that is from Canada, but if its Alexander Graham Bell, you are wrong. He was born in Scotland, only lived in Canada for two years, then moved to the United States before patenting the telephone.

If you are talking about Elisha Gray, well he was born in the United States and invented the telephone about the same time Bell did. They both rushed to the patent office within hours of each other to get a patent on their work. Many legal battles ensued, but Bell won. So, he is commonly known as the inventor of the telephone.

You are wrong. Keep trying.


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Football.....who gives a *beep* if you are talking about American football, otherwise Association Football (the world's favourite sport) is widely regarded to be of British decent (in its current recognised form although earlier ball kicking games are known in Chinese history, etc).

If you include American Football then we will have cricket, tennis, golf, darts, snooker, badminton, bobsleigh, bowls (lawn), curling, rugby, rowing, hockey (on grass), Alpine skiing (as a sport.....), squash, table tennis, water polo, yachting, archery, even baseball is based on the English game of rounders. All of these sports are more 'international' than American Football....i.e played professionally in more countries.

The Subway????!!!!.....well of course you invented the Subway because it is only called this in America, just as the French invented the Metro and the English the Underground......but you will find the oldest underground public transport system in the world is the London Underground.....and the French probably devised the first subway sandwich, whlst the English were originators of the sandwich (named after the Earl of Sandwich).

Who the hell invents a skyscraper??......it is a tall building. Americans may have built the first skyscraper.

Motorcycles are a German invention.

Toilet paper??!!!...hahahaha...you are taking the piss now. Yeah, because no one before the yanks (history of about 400 years) thought of wiping their arses with anything else but their hand!!! BTW, a quick scan suggests it is a Chinese invention (as in specifically made for this) back in the 14th century (older than the USA itself) and paper had been used as early as the 6th ccentury....not surprising as they invented 'true' paper and wouldn't take one of the World's most developed cultures at the time to think of this use.

Artificial refrigeration was invented by a Scot, but an American did build the first practical machine.

Safe elevators/lift........elevators/lifts been around for ages....people still die in elevator accidents every year so you could argue the they have yet to be invented.

Apparently a Brit by the name of Robert Barron invented the double-acting tumbler lock in 1778 but Linus Yale (American) did invent the pin-tumbler lock.

Blue Jeans......I don't know who invented 'blue jeans' but then I don't give a crap who invented turquoise jeans or red jeans or green jeans.......it would appear that 'blue jeans' are a French invention named after Genoa (bleu de Genes) and the denim name is derived from 'de Nimes'. BTW, Levi Strauss the inventor of riveted jeans was German-born.

Electricity???!!!......no one invented electricity, it is a natural phenomenon that has existed since time began. Many people have worked in the fields and contributed greatly such as Michael Faraday (English) and Benjamin Franklin (American).

Thing is Americans have invented many things, and a lot more significant inventions than the ones that you have listed....every country has stupid, clever, ugly, pretty, fat, thin, etc, etc, people. However, we all know that some countries have traits that are more 'predominant' than in others, e.g. tall people in Holland, blondes in Sweden, pasty people in England, obese people in the USA, etc, etc. In terms of intelligence I have no clue who is the cleverest (not the same as knowledgeable......when I think of knowledgeable cultures I think of Scandanavians but don't know if this is true).

BTW, as I mentioned earlier, I live in America/USA and thus judge you as a nation by what I see, read and hear.



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Your points are well made. I believe it was Noah Webster who actively revised the spelling of English for Americans which, for most of its history from the days of Chaucer onwards had no accepted conventions.

One convention i definitely take issue with jowever is the American spelling of "ass". This is simply not correct as the anlo-saxon original has always been "arse".

However I struggle to accept that America "invented" electricity, which is a natural phenomenon, or football which has been known in Europe since the Middle Ages.

Nor the first motorcycle was constructed in Stuttgart, Germany.

The first London underground railway opened in 1863, six years before the first New York subway transit line.

Blue Jeans actually originated in Genoa, Italy in the 1600 as a garmet designed for the Genoese navy, hence the name form Bleu de Genes (Genes being the francophone version of Genoa)

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Kinda funny, but there is a problem...when you turn your self-deprecating humor on another group it's no longer SELF-deprecating, it's pretentious posturing.

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Only slightly correct jinky. The birthday of the United States of America—Independence Day—is celebrated on July 4, the day the wording of the Declaration was approved by Congress. You are the dumba$$ for ASSuming that we celebrate the wrong day. The debate on the proposed Declaration came to a termination on the evening of the 4th of July. The document was then reported by the committee, agreed to by the House, and signed by every member present, except General Dickinson. Then a final draft, the famous typeset one not handwritten one, was created after July 19th and signed by most Congressional delegates on August 2nd. So it was signed on both days. Get your facts straight.

As far as voting for Bush twice, well, lets just say he was the lesser of two evils. I can't wait until we get another Democrat in the office and see what happens good or bad. I don't care. I want change just as much as Obama says that he is going to change things. I just wish he would say HOW he is going to do it. I don't recall him getting around to that yet. At least he isn't going with the John Kerry approach. "Vote for me, because I am not George Bush!" I hate what Bush has done to this country and I hate how every one else in the world looks at Americans because of him.

As for WWII, yes we came in to fight back because we were being attacked unprovoked, but in doing so we also saved England, so there you have it.

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It's a shame you didn't join in a little earlier - it would have saved a lot of lives.

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Very true. I'm all for saving lives.

BOYCOTT SHAMPOO! DEMAND REAL POO!

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Wow Drewbacca u *beep* stupid piece of *beep* *beep*

Ur juz like all the other Americans, you think your the only country that exists, nowhere else matters and you have no idea about anything that goes on outside of America.. *beep* prick




"piss ya pants.. I said piss ya pants!!"

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Why don't you take your Ritalin so you can read more than 5 lines, lorddeano?

I will put what I said at the top for you.

Sure there are many things that were invented in other countries by people of other nationalities, but one thing remains; Americans are just like the rest of the world. Some strong, some weak, some smart, some stupid, some pretty, some ugly, some nice, some mean. Don't judge us by what you see on TV. We don't judge English people based on Benny Hill and David Brent.


I don't think America is the only country that exists. I do however have pride in my country as I'm sure you do in your's.

I do know and believe that the world has gotten better from many contributions from many different people in many different countries. I know plenty of what happens outside of America. That's because I know how to use the internet (brought to us by the collective findings and works of several Americans) and read newspapers (the first one printed in Germany in 1605) and listen to radio (invented in Germany or Russia depending on who you ask) and call my foreign friends on the telephone (helped along with discoveries from Italians and French, but the final concept was invented in America) or cell phone (an American invention) and even how to travel by flying on airplanes (invented by Americans).

Oh, and learn when to use your and you're in the correct context.

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ok then.. you're a *beep*

better?

"piss ya pants.. I said piss ya pants!!"

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The Chinese and the Arabs are the smartest races :P



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"What, like war?"
"Not exactly...."
-GTA IV

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