Is this what I'm thinking of?


The only thing I remember about this damn movie is that in the credits Michael Jackson and other children are riding on a carosel--that's it. That is ALL I remember of this movie and that I thought it was kind of trippy. They showed it to us in 2nd grade. What I think is even MORE strange is the movie they recommend if you like this one: Jack and the Benstalk (1974) is one of my all time faves and only like..78 people have voted on it on IMDB so not that many...I only know of one other person that has heard of it without my mentioning of it besides me. I just think of all the millions of movies out there I stumbled across this one on IMDB after trying to figure out 'what that Michael Jackson movie where he's on the carosel' is...hmmm..odd. Oh well.

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I think I remember Rosie Greer, the former NFL player knitting and/or singing "it's all right to cry" or something.

The theme song echoes in there somewhere too.

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It is indeed "It's All Right to Cry." IIRC, he's playing an acoustic guitar and singing. A few lyrics:

It's all right to cry
Crying takes the mad out of you
It's all right to cry
It might make you feel better!

He closes with "It's all right to cry little boy -- I know some big boys who cry too."

GENIUS

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He's not actually playing the guitar.

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I went to elementary school in Southern California from 1975 to 1981, and they showed this to us at least once a year. I hate to negatively effect the fond memories that so many people seem to have for this thing, but I gotta tell ya- this is touchy-feely, post-hippy crap created during the height of a historical point in which musicians like Dan Fogelberg, James Taylor and John Denver were threatening to turn a huge portion of American Society in a bunch of pansies. I'm sure Marlo Thomas and company had nothing but the best of intentions in mind when they came up with this, but the manner in which it presents the whole "get in touch with your feelings/it's okay to cry, girls can play football and boys can play with dolls/ just be yourself as long as it doesn't hurt anybody" is lacking in one major respect- they forgot to spread the message to those over the age of twelve. I'm sure that there were other kids, like myself, who took the message to heart, and then went through hell for the next 10 years dealing with a society unprepared, unable and unwilling to let ANYONE be free to be who they truly were. I'm now 35 and have fought off accusations and suspicions that I'm gay for 20 years, largely because I'm in touch with my feminine side, largely because of this movie. Thank God that the Metrosexual was defined at long last!

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And how could anyone forget the baby puppets sitting in the nursery at the hospital comparing themselves to one another....Mel Brooks and Marlo Thomas voicing babies, wow....
I remember watching this movie in like Kindergarden and the 1st grade, and seeings how I am 35 now, I feel all mushy inside (lol).....

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damn those babies. mel wanted to be a cocktail waitress i think.

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That was the first time I ever heard Mel Brooks and I loved the way he did it. The 2000 Year Old Man had nothing on this.

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LOL!!!!! You're killing me, brah! That is great stuff! I'm 35 so that struck a chord.

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Okay, I remember this show fondly. It was even the theme of my mom's Parents Without Partners float in some parade. I remember being kind of consoled with the idea that it's okay to be different.

I took the message to heart, but it's what I heard growing up... "be yourself". And yeah, society in general doesn't accept differences easily, especially guys in touch with their feminine side. But you know, it's not a bad message to take to heart. I don't think it's such a bad thing to want to be yourself DESPITE the intolerance.

Do you think you'd have been better prepared WITHOUT this message? Wouldn't you still have been smacked around by the bullies and bigots in life, except with no real suspicion that they were wrong to be that way towards you? Or do you think the show really made you a sissy with its magical sissy songs and Marlo Thomas' pretty smiles melting your budding machismo?

It's not the show or the message that was wrong, it's how you and I were treated that was wrong.

Anyway, glad to know it wasn't just me that thought this was important.

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lol. it's ok. i didn't get married because of the atalanta segment ;)

but i still am glad i was exposed to it!


http://www.BrainyBlonde.com

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That Michael Jackson-carousel thing rings a bell, but I don't know if it was this movie.

I LOVED this movie. I had the baby skit memorized - I found the book version when I was cleaning out some old junk, and enjoyed looking through it almost 30 years later! (although I managed to get all of the songs stuck in my head again, which was kind of annoying)

I found a shirt at Old Navy with the logo, but surprisingly not many people around me know what it means.

I don't think it's hippie-dippy junk, as some have expressed; I think it was really supposed to share with kids that we should all be FREE TO BE YOU AND ME!

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I truly loved this movie. It came out when I was eight years old, and I even owned the book and record. Yeah, it's so 70's, but it was such a fun movie. I bought it on eBay for my girls and they LOVE it. Well, my almost-13 year old pretends it's silly, but I saw her sitting there the other day watching and singing with the 6 year old, so she doesn't fool me. At the time this was made there wasn't anything else like it, remember that. Now there are all kinds of shows you can watch, rent or buy geared for kids, but back then there was zip. Nada. Remember how we couldn't wait for Saturday mornings for cartoons? And how the only things on in the morning or afternoon were either Sesame Street type things or those Sid & Marty Krofft shows. I watched Scooby Doo or reruns of the Brady Bunch, too. SAd! Oh, and my kids can't believe there was a time when T.V. shut off at night---the flag waving and the National Anthem playing and then there was nothing else until morning. Oh, fond memories for a 40 year old lady....!!!

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I agree that this movie is a trippy slice of history. I wish Marlo and Friends would get together once again and hold an intervention for poor Michael Jackson, who sang "We don't have to change at all"(!). What happened to the world?

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One movie can't change the world. If it could, there'd be no more racism, sexism, or homophobia. But it can certainly inform many frustrated people that they are not alone and inspire them to work harder toward making the world accept them for who they are. Teachers who showed this movie to their students should have POUNCED on any kid who attacked a classmate for being different during recess, if not for the sheer pedagogical reason of being consequent.

I grew up with this movie and a set of parents and a few teachers who consistently reiterated the tolerant message: that boys or girls who want to play with dolls should; that a person can pursue any career they want to regardless of their gender; that marriage should not be anyone's key to success and security but rather to love and friendship if they so choose; and that girls like the Tender Sweet Young Thing who fall back on their gender as a pathetic excuse for manipulating and attracting men are indeed pathetic and manipulative.

The film's message micro-cosmically is that no one should get out of their seat for a woman just because she is a woman; they should get out of their seat if the woman is elderly or handicapped or pregnant, just as they should for a man who is elderly or handicapped or carrying his infant in his arms.

Of course the world is still horribly cold toward people who are different and deeply entrenched in its arbitrary gender roles since the film came out thirty years ago, but change has been made. And as a 25 year-old woman, it sure is nice that I can go to college, get a job, manage my own money, and have a wonderful male partner who splits the chores equally with me so that I don't have to cook or do laundry. And though many of my peers suggest otherwise, thanks to films like this and the people who promoted them, I know my worth isn't determined by the size of my engagement ring or the number of kids I decide to have.

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whylime-1: "One movie can't change the world. If it could, there'd be no more racism, sexism, or homophobia. But it can certainly inform many frustrated people that they are not alone and inspire them to work harder toward making the world accept them for who they are."
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Work harder? Such as how? Outyell others that they have to be more acceptable towards them?

"I have MY rights to live MY life! Who are you to tell me otherwise?"

The problem with programs such as these is they seem to think the only people they are reaching are those perceived by the 1950s nuclear family group as being different.

They don't seem to grasp that Christian religious children are harassed, bullied and ridiculed the same way a boy with a doll or a girl who wants to play football can be picked on.

I have no problem with someone being perceived as 'different' but I do have a problem with depictions of those who do the discriminating as being out-and-out hate-filled, 'we dont want THEM around' and rubbish like that, simply and solely to put the stars of a show in the spotlight or justify their being defensive.

Free To Be You And Me should have been preaching Accept Others For Who They Are, including fundamentalist religious persons who are pro-life.

Aren't they entitled to their opinions the same way?

"Yes, but when they start shoving their religion down others throats, . . . "

Having grown up in such a religion, I am well aware of the practices, and they do NOT shove religion or the way others should live down anyone's throats.

If some do, such as Falwell, Rev. Donald Wildmon, Al Sharpton or Louis Farrakhan (whose behavior seems to be changing), that doesnt mean ALL of them do.

How about letting THEM be Free To Be Who They Are.

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I guess it was to show that we shouldn't abuse the thing about ladies always being first. That was old values that don't really matter anyway.

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Never mind "what happened to the world?"--what happened to Michael Jackson?!?!?! For someone who sang "We don't have to change at all.", he sure did change A LOT!!!!!!

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In this movie, Michael Jackson is singing a song with Roberta Flack about growing up, "We don't have to change at all."

The carosel is a movie he did when he was older. I think it was Moonwalker, but I could be wrong.

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It's on TV Land right now. Also, if you search YouTube, you can find the segements there.

http://www.13tongimp.com/

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Just saw the end of it. According to TV Guide, it will air again in the morning at 10:00 PST. I'll be sure to record it.

They showed this to us in school in both 2nd and 3rd grade. I also remember my 3rd grade teacher playing the sound track to the film repeatedly. Seeing it after almost 30 years sure brings back memories.

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And here I thought I was the only one who remembered this show. I am 34 and it sure stirs up lots of old memories. I remember singing the theme song in music class one year when I was about 8. The teacher had hand motions and everything choreographed. I am sure everyone that was older thought it was the dumbest thing ever.

I remembered the "Ladies First" and William's doll skits the best but the more I saw the more old memories it stirred up. In any case I still have the book this makes me want to drag it out. Thanks for reminding me that I am not alone in remembering this old stuff.

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I saw this a few times as well at school and such when I was a kid, and I'm 27. I'm too young to have seen it when it first came out, but I remember seeing it a few times. Most people have no idea what I'm talking about when I mention this show.

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ThomBjork: "The only thing I remember about this damn movie is that in the credits Michael Jackson and other children are riding on a carosel--that's it. That is ALL I remember of this movie and that I thought it was kind of trippy. They showed it to us in 2nd grade."
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I checked my copy. I already knew Michael Jackson wasnt on the merry-go-round, but I wanted to make sure before I responded.

Michael Jackson is only shown in the duet with Roberta Flack.

there is a young child with an afro on the merry-go-round, but he isn't Michael Jackson.

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yyyyyup...that's the title track to the album!!!

"...and you and me are free to be, you and me."

I sang that song in elementary school too (I'm 40 now); my second grade class did a stage show incorporating songs from the album. The next year at an assembly with other third graders, my then-second grade teacher called her former students to the stage to perform the show again AND WE ALL REMEMBERED IT!!!!


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I think the album was released in 1971 and the TV special (later released on video) was released in 1974.

Actually, the lyrics still resonate with people today. According to the liner notes from the album (YES...I'm old enough to remember albums) and interviews, Marlo Thomas recorded the album for her young niece in an effort to shatter gender stereotypes; Thomas was disappointed that all of the books and toys her niece was given to play with were right outta the 1950s (men are doctors or policemen or construction workers while women are housekeepers or nurses or teachers, if women work outside the home at all).

Obviously, things have changed since then, but it's still a good lesson for kids to learn so perhaps Thomas did something right.

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I remember albums myself, and I just turned 28 last month. I just remember the tail end of them being popular though. I had some singles(Paul Simon, Bangles, and Run DMC) on record when I was a kid and a Star Wars read along thing, and probably a couple other things. My parents also had some 8-tracks as well back then.

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