Arwen on the poster


Something has always annoyed me... Why is Arwen featured so prominently on LOTR official posters? The original DVD cover for The Two Towers (with the big moon in the top left) includes a close-up shot of Arwen - Larger than Legolas, Gimli, Sam or Gollum.

I can't think of any justification for her being chosen over many of the more important characters. She's certainly not a major role in this film - Seems she is barely in it compared to Theoden (who isn't on the cover at all!) Is it just because she is female? I don't remember Liv Tyler being such a big star at the time either - So it's not like people were persuaded to buy it just because she is on there.

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Huh. Let's see: an advertisement for a movie puts a picture of an attractive woman in the poster. You're right - it's just plain crazy.

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That's exactly my question.

It's critically/commercially the most successful trilogy in cinema history. Is Liv Tyler really given prominence just because she's a woman? Like nobody would have gone to watch the film otherwise? You would assume she's one of the main 4 characters based on the poster.

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Right. That's Hollywood (or Zeallywood).

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I suspect her prominence played two roles.

One: yes, she's a woman. And regardless of what Tolkien/LOTR fans might do, it can be a worry to suits that women won't come to these sorts of movies. They might feel that having a woman on the poster suggests there is something in this story that might appeal to a woman.

Two: she was somewhat well known. Suits always feel more comfortable having actors people will recognize on their publicity products.

It was interesting to me that, for FOTR, the promotion involving music was very heavily focused on Enya. For the next two movies, the focus shifted more to the actual score and Howard Shore.

I suspect that they were using Enya to generate interest in the movie and back in that day, a singer like this involved with a movie would go on late night talk shows, etc. to perform the music and promote the movie.

As the movies generated their own steam, popularity and interest with fans, they didn't have to rely so heavily on *names*.

If you think about what might make you tune into a late night talk show, it will always be someone you recognize who is making the rounds to talk about their new project. It's rarely the unknown.

Also keep in mind, the people making the posters are rarely the actual filmmakers. I'm not sure how much veto or say they even have in the manner. The same with trailers.

So one really has to consider what someone in an office somewhere thinks will *sell* a movie. Someone perhaps totally disconnected from the actual project and/or fan base (or potential fan base).

Movie promotion is really different today than it was 1999-2003. Don't make any assumptions about why things were done 'then' by how they're done 'today' (not that you are, necessarily. I'm just not sure how old you were or how involved you were in the fandom in 1999-2003 such that you might remember.)

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Correct. For sex appeal.

"See? He can be a real sweetheart once you get to know him."-Fluttershy

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I think more than just being a woman/sex appeal it was that she was a more well known actor than most others. She was listed like fourth in the credits, even though other characters were obviously more prominent than her.

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As less prominent as she was as the other characters, she was the closest to one of the most prominent characters and that gave her this leading lady publicity. If you're the love of a main hero, that gives you a high status among the rest of the more prominent cast, especially since Arwen is a major driving force for Aragorn and lingers in his mind that gives her a more spiritual presence over Aragorn's quest.

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Also keep in mind that when Liv Tyler was first cast, Arwen was supposed to have a much larger role in the story.

Originally Arwen and Elrond were going to travel to Lothlorien to visit Galadriel. Arwen would look in the mirror and see Aragorn dying at Helm's Deep and that is what prompted her and her father to ask for troops to go to Helm's Deep. Arwen would have then gone to fight in the Battle of Helm's Deep, which would have made her present during the entire film's third act.

Had the scriptwriters not rewrote Arwen's arc due to fan backlash, Arwen would have likely been more involved in the plot of The Return of the King.

But as we all know they decided to cut all of Arwen's scenes at Helm's Deep (she could still be seen briefly in the background after Gandalf and the Riders of Rohan save the day), and they came up with a new story — more faithful to her character in the — in which she contemplates her future of living on after Aragorn dies.

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One thing I've always wondered about this is how they were planning to handle the triangle with Eowyn and Arwen's role in ROTK in general once she had shown up to fight in Helm's Deep?

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Would you rather stare at Liv Tyler, or Gollum?

Look- it's trying to think!

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Either or is fine.

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Gollum on the main movie poster just doesn't have that same effect as Arwen on the poster.

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Gollum is adorable. Look how cute he is.

https://youtu.be/a6YKD5hCShI?t=89

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While she was not quite as prominent a character in the books, she was given a larger role in the films, and the original plan was for her to go to Helm's Deep to help out the army there against the Uru-khai, but the idea was scrapped during the post-production period.

So there are a lot of cut-scenes of her doing stuff at Rivendell, and advertisements of her being shown prominently, but due to changes in plans, you don't see this in the final cut, not even the Director's cut.

I learned about this at the AlleyCatScratch website where they had pages on all the costumes in the films, including the burgundy robe Arwen wore when fighting at Helm's Deep in the original movie plan.

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That's disappointing. Fan boys ruin everything.

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