Wrong vision


Actually, most of the movies about this story do not convey Tolstoy's point. Anna's character if just much more complex. Tolsoy's showed a woman of a questionable qualities and character. He actualy tried to show that Anna's was able to give up everything, but not because her love was so great. She didn't feel pity for her husband (loving and honest person), she could leave her son (even though she could take him with her), she destroyed her relationship with Vronsky because she didn't want to move on and be a good partner for him, she wanter to live on the world of passion forever. Tolstoy's point was that it probably was not worth it, and the destruction of that.
Most of the movies want to show just a love story, and that she died because she loved too much, which is not true. Vronsky was honest to her, and did everything to make her happy. But she was not able to be happy, and not because he didn't love her much enough, but because she, herself, was not a happy person, didn't have faith, ground and maturity of a person who is able to take responsibility for her actions, and was just able to pity herself and only herself. Deep down, she didn't love anyone.
On the other side of the story love of Kity and Levin, based on faith, commitment to marriage, respect and love.
The moral of the story to compary two different stories and to show that Anna's death happened before she actually died. She easily betrayed everything she had for passion, and she didn't get anything in return, because there wasn't anything there.
Unfortunately, none of the movies about Anna Karenina shows the story right. Everyone concentrates just on the love side only, and this makes all the movies stupid and dull.

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THANK YOU so much for this insight!
I just purchased three Anna Karenina movies on eBay but haven't watched them yet. I actually did not intend to purchase all three (long story).

Anyway, I now have this 1997 one as above, and also the black and whites with Greta Garbo and Vivien Leigh. I would like very much to find the movie that best portrays the true Tolstoy story. Have you seen these other two (old) ones? Or anyt of the ballet versions?

I've done a web search and there are many, many versions. These three are the only ones I could find on eBay though... I'd rather hear from you before I purchase any more!

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I read the book by Tolstoy and I must say you are right. But film is film, book is book, I adore this 1997 version, great atmohphere and acting.

You wanna play rough! OK. Say hallo to my little friend !
Al Pacino, Scarface (1983)

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borissenkot -
I like what you had to write a lot. Her flaw was not that she loved too much as is often portrayed but is instead that she didn't love enough. I read this post while the movie was 3/4 of the way done. It was on TV and I read during commercials :)

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Anna karenina 1967 the best theatrical adaptaion of anna karenina in my opinion it is a masterpiece.

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Russian adaptation of 1967 is the closest to the book. I agree. Anna there looks as described in the book. It is a masterpiece. The book is much better. But even in Russia people fooled by adaptation. There is a work by a literature critic who actually points out things people don't see in the book, but Tolstoy clearly conveyed that. I am not sure it is available in English. The main point of that work (quite a long book going through the pages of the book), that Tolstoy tried to show from the very first pages that Anna wasn't a great person. And not because of infedelity, this happens with all of us, all the time. She was just in love with herself, her feeling, all other people go to hell, she lived for herself, and it proved wrong for her. And that was just a book. But a book by a clever man.

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"She didn't feel pity for her husband (loving and honest person), she could leave her son (even though she could take him with her), she destroyed her relationship with Vronsky because she didn't want to move on and be a good partner for him, she wanter to live on the world of passion forever. Tolstoy's point was that it probably was not worth it, and the destruction of that.
Most of the movies want to show just a love story, and that she died because she loved too much, which is not true. Vronsky was honest to her, and did everything to make her happy. But she was not able to be happy, and not because he didn't love her much enough, but because she, herself, was not a happy person, didn't have faith, ground and maturity of a person who is able to take responsibility for her actions, and was just able to pity herself and only herself. Deep down, she didn't love anyone."

These lines show only how sorely you have missread the book "Anna Karenina" by Leo Tolstoy, namely it's key character.
Tolstoy actually depicted Anna as a very human character, but unwilling to fit to mediocre standards, and therefore crushed by the society. She, simply, wanted more of life than what she was forced to live - a dull, conventional marriage as most of "socially acclaimed" marriages were at the time, brokered as a good trade deal instead of love communion. She followed her heart, but soon she was also betrayed by Vronsky, too, and forced to obbey to another line of society conventions - that she is an outcast woman, just slightly less condemned than a prostitute.
Tolstoy's novel was actually first of all critics of society based on such marriages as Karenin's and based on double moral standards that lead Anna Karenina to suicide. If you read the novel more carefully, it is plain to see that Tolstoy had a lot of sympathy for Anna Karenina character.
I cant find a more wonderful interpreter for Ana Karenina character than Sophie Marceau.

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i agree wholeheartedly with what you have said. i first read Anna Karenina when i was in kindergarten. yes...kindergarten. long boring story...lol

what the person wrote you are referring to couldn't be more off. the person most assuredly read the book from the surface. unable (through no fault of his or her own i'm sure) to dig down further and try to put themselves into the characters shoes.

if you can do that....then you can truly appreciate a book. ;-)

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I agree with you Vladimir. As I was reading the OP's comment, I wondered if we had read the same book. Tolstoy definitely has sympathy for Anna, whom he describes as "full of life", not so much for society's rules, which his character Levin (Levin pretty much is Tolstoy, and his character does many of the things he actually did in real life) criticizes quite often (including peasants vs aristocrats). And she did feel pity for her husband, which is why she refused to divorce to begin with (after she got sick, eventho at this point he was perfectly willing to give her a divorce), and she also loved her son, which is why she couldn't accept her husband's condition for the divorce.

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I agree as well.

It shows wonderfully what happens when you want to follow your star, and live fully, but society condemns you for it.

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