MovieChat Forums > Baraka (1993) Discussion > Baraka v koyaanisqatsi

Baraka v koyaanisqatsi


What do ou think of the (3) koyaanisqatsi films in comparison t Baraka. On those movie boards the gernal consensus is that Koy rates highest and that proably pow is also superior to this one.

I hope people that comment have een them all for a well rounded perspective.

And please don't troll.


If you don't know the koyaanisqatsi movies you can look them up on imdb or visit
http://www.koyaanisqatsi.org/

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Many fans prefer Baraka, in my experience. It is more spiritual.

If you encounter Baraka first, you have a spiritual, emotional response, which the other films can't match.

Koyaan most often provokes the response 'What the *beep* is going on with this music???'

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The music is great. Kind of the point.

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I have seen the Qatsi trilogy and Baraka. I'd say Baraka is my personal favourite. More imagery of people, places, architecture and landscape. It contains more cultural diversity and great use of evocative music.

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The above poster is pretty on in why I'd also say Baraka is superior.

Though- all the films have a specific orientation and message - I'd say Baraka is more of a blend of the 3 qatsi films. At least it feels that way.

I personally think it's better pieced together, flows smoother than the other 3, but that's just preference. I really do think they all have something to offer.

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I haven't seen the other two Koyaanisquatsi films, but I like both Koy...and Baraka. I describe Baraka as "Koyaanisquatsi with a sense of humour."

It just depends on what kind of mood I'm in. Baraka is generally of a lighter, prettier persuasion, so naturally I'm going to prefer that, but I love them both.

What?! WHAT??!?! WHAAAAT!! The Glove is losing its touch!! — Chief Blue Meanie

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see though, I've always found Koy to be quirkier, and Baraka to have a more serious/spiritual tone. There was a lot in Koy that gave off a humorous mood, from the 80s culture blah, to the ladies in Vegas (http://sexyisback.ytmnd.com/), to the often very playful Glass score.

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I like them all but they all are very different. The qatsi series seems more about warning us how we are falling from grace, while Baraka seems more neutral (just showing us the spectrum that is humanity, the good and bad of humanity). To me Baraka seems more a documentary about people, our difference and similarities. But Koyaanisqatsi is my favorite, it was the first and it set the standard for this genre. Koyaanisqatsi also seems to me to have the most intent and purpose (message to tell). Baraka seems more a menagerie to me. I do love Baraka though. There are some scenes in Baraka (like the kuwait oil fires) that captures moments that will likely never happen again. I wish more films of this style were made.

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I second that.

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I wouldn't pit one agaisnt the other. Both are very good films. My PERSONAL PREFERENCE goes to Baraka, but that might be because i saw it first, and saw it at the theater, while i saw Koyaanisqatsi on DVD. Nevertheless, that doesn't stop me from loving both, and know for certain both are excelent films. One can love both and not be conflicted about it. One vs the other is just silly.

"This are Nice shoes! Couldn't you afford some real Nike?"

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I think it's better to compare Baraka to Koyaanisqatsi. (the other 2 qatsi's being pretty universally known to be inferior)

Given Koy came out 10 years earlier and the styles are so similar, the nod has to go to Koy as the more original of the two. The quality of the 70mm film stock in Baraka is definitely superior, but that is the only place where it surpasses the original.

Koy builds in power and narrative as the movie progresses and the Phillip Glass score is legendary. The Baraka score is forgettable, as are many of the beautiful pictures the moment they are off screen. The film has the look of one long establishing shot and makes the error of including contemporary (at the time) war footage from the first gulf war. Images from the holocaust are also clumsily inserted and out of place.

Yes, I know Ron Fricke was the cinematographer and writer on Koy. But why duplicate so many of the exact same shots? Was he trying to make it the sequel that the other qatsi's never were? Was it a remake? Or was it a do-over in his eyes? The film he really wanted to make in 1982 but couldn't because Reggio was in charge?

Koyaanisqatsi is a landmark film due in no small part to Ron Fricke. But Godfrey Reggio was the director so he deserves the lions share of the credit.

Baraka is an admirable, but altogether inferior work.

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IMO Koyaanisqatsi is simply one of the greatest movies ever made.

The reason, is that Koy has a very moving message/moral/story which is told in an amazing way. The rest are just travelogues by comparison - pretty, but nothing more.

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I think Koyaanisqatsi may be a more important film, considering it was made many years before Baraka and was more or a less the first attemp made at this sort of minimalist film, but I saw Baraka first and the way that the film opened my eyes to much of the world I've never witnessed was an irreplacable experience. Can't wait for Samsara!

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Koyaanisqatsi is definitely the better movie. It is massive and in-your-face. It contains some of the greatest ideas put on film ever. Just check the 747 airplanes coming out of the sizzling hot air, this shot alone is perfectly put on film. Koya is also filled with decadent, tired, impoverished and worn out Americana - and yet it is an amazingly fascinating movie with thousands of messages besides "we are doing everything wrong". There is so much more to it.
One of my all time favorite movies.
Baraka is great, but does not come close to Koyaanisqatsi.

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