Chilling


If you like atmospheric slow burn horror then this is the film for you. I think The Woman in Black, without a doubt, scares me more than any other horror film. There’s something about knowing she’s there for the children, and her burning anger for Mr Kidd that builds and builds until its smothering. The scene in the graveyard when he feels the hair on the back of his neck stand up is really the one that gets me. They don’t make em like this anymore.

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Certainly, Mrmojo4700. Jennet exudes a bizarre and disturbing combination of being alive and being dead. Her presence projects the coldness of the movie in to the audience. One can feel the sharp, crisp air of the setting throughout the film, but looking at the woman in black herself is like being pulled into frigid water, especially when she begins to walk toward Arthur. Jennet's face is unspeakably menacing and overpowering. Never have I found makeup scarier. This movie is astonishingly strong for a television one. Today's horror films are saturated with stupidity, whining, and gaudy visual effects. The Woman In Black unravels itself unaided, which is why it is so gripping.

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I must agree with all you have said. I am a massive 60’s - 80’s horror fan and I’ve searched it out for years from mainstream to the obscure. But yes, this film strikes something inside of me that is so oppressive. I swear it felt like she was in the room with mr Kidd even when he was back at work and he burned the papers. It’s really an amazing film, and even more so that it was made for television.

Other made for TV films that I think are also outstanding are Dark Night of the Scarecrow (1981) and Don’t go to Sleep (1982).

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Thank you. I was so happy to see your post. All of the others came from people who were only on the original forum and never joined this one. That made me think that I wasn't going to have anyone to discuss this movie with. I was glad that you informed me of Don't Go To Sleep. Its description had my interest.

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