MovieChat Forums > Ten Little Indians (1989) Discussion > Why do they have to rape a good book lik...

Why do they have to rape a good book like this?!?


I mean, Agatha Christie's "Ten Little Niggers" was a really good book, but in the end, everybody died. But then why did Lombard and Claythorne stay alive in this movie?!?! This is like all those romance-films... I don't understand why they made this kind of p.o.s....

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First, a little known fact: The Christie novel was never published under the title Ten Little Niggers; the confusion arises because the nursery rhyme from which it takes its name used the N word. From its first edition the Christie novel was known as Ten Little Indians; ever since the 1943 movie it has alternately been known as And Then There Were None.

The original novel ended with all the characters dead, and the last survivor literally putting a note in a bottle that later washed ashore. However, it was Agatha Christie herself, in her 1939 theatrical adaptation for the West End, who changed the ending to allow Vera and Phillip to be innocent, and to survive the massacre. So if you liked the novel's ending, you have Agatha herself to blame for the change ...

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Ok, I'm sorry, but in the finnish book "Kymmenen pientä neekeripoikaa(ten little niggers)" they all die. And I haven't read other Christie's books.

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I have to diagree. According to “The Agatha Christie Bedside Companion,” the book was originally published as “Ten Little N*****s” in England in 1939. (You can find copies under this title on ebay!) The American publisher thought the title was too offensive (even for 1940), which was why the American title was “And Then There Were None.” (Although the word “n*****” was still used in the story.)

I’m not positive when “n*****s” was replaced with “indians,” possibly at the time the stage play was produced.

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You are correct. The edition my Dad owns which I have read is published under the original title Ten Little N*****s.

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Here in Iceland the title of this book is "Tiu litlir negrastrakar" and lists the original title as being Ten Little n*****s You see, in Iceland it's not really an offensive word. Considering the ending: You'll not find a single English version of the film that doesn't contain the "happy" ending, all four versions have the tacked on Hollywood type ending. The novel ending was much better in my opinion.

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Why are you so afraid to type that word for!?

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No one wants to say the N word *beep* because in this day and age it is considered by all but trailer trash to be offensive to African Americans. Even I who am not black never say *beep* as an insult or as a hateful term because it classes the whole race as that. I have many black friends who I'm sure would be offeneded by that word.

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Sadly enough, I have to admit that it was Dame Agatha herself that made the change. However, I see the logic in making a stage version of the story with the plot revelations coming as they did.

However, with modern movie techniques and special effects as they are now, I see no reason that we can't see a truly faithful adaptation of this masterpiece. It is my favorite Agatha Christie novel by far, and I think it should be done justice.

All in favor?

===============================
Ando has SPOKEN!!!
...and they rejoiced...
...yaaaaaay.....

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[deleted]

Yep, Christie changed the ending for the stage play, because the stage play was originally produced during World War II. Specifically, during the point in the war where the Germans were bombing the hell out of England on a nightly basis. She felt that the audiences didn't need a downbeat ending.

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And Lo, the BBC have, 10 years later, answered our prayers!

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I own a copy of Ten Little *beep* I think it was only in America that it wasn't titled so.

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I believe that it was originally published as 'Ten Little *beep* in the UK but was deemed to offensive in the USA and was named 'And Then There Were None'. When Christie wrote the play she named it 'Ten Little Indians', presumably to represent the subtle differences with the book. Eventually, the UK edition was forced to be changed to 'And Then There Were None'. This film is perhaps named Indians to show it is based on the play and not the novel.

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i liked this movie!!!

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Hey Napoleon799, try type n*gg*rs and post it, it will automatically be replaced by *beep*

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That sucks.

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In Spain the original name have never been changed. Actually we don't have any problem saying this word and nobody feels bad for it.

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[deleted]

I haven't noticed anyways. Thanxs

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Very well stated. I think you have a good point but I still won't use Nig*ger as an insult to anyone. You are certainly learned more people should understand like you do. I feel that I think the same way often.

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Sticks and stones may not break your bones, But I bet they will when someone who doesn't like that word nig*ger hits you upside your head and stomps on your throat, hehehe. So sticks and stones will break your bones, especially in a riot, hehehe.

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The word is only considered ofensive due to convention. Maybe it was used to refer to the african slaves, and that's why it's considered ofensive. But really, I thinksuspect the word's original meaning was black.

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The word *beep* comes from the latin Nigrum (through the Spanish Neg_ro) that simply means "black", nothing more, nothing less.

In my opinion the most important thing (apart from the feeling of the person addressed with this kind of terms) should be the intention of the speaker. If I meet a friend after a long time, and he ambraces me saying "Hey old fa_g, how are you?!" it's ok for me, and even a form of friendship and affection! (btw, yes I'm gay!)

But maybe things work differently here in Europe...


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