MovieChat Forums > Dead Poets Society (1989) Discussion > Are there still boarding schools like th...

Are there still boarding schools like this?


I suppose there must be, but I have never met a person, to my knowledge, who has gone to a same-sex boarding school.

When a cold momma gets hot, boy how she sizzles!

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I know someone who did in England, where there are plenty.

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And in Australia. My children attended same-sex boarding schools (called private schools here)and excelled while there.

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What a horrible excuse for a parent you are.

"Every time there is a bang, the world's a wanker short." -Billy Connolly

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Who do you think you are? You know nothing about me.

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Sending your children away is unnatural. Boarding schools should only be allowed to exist if no child can be compelled to go to or stay at one.

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Or the parent had to work very long hours to support the family?

Who do you people think you are?

I don't owe you an explanation. This is a film site.

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That is no excuse.If you're working long hours to pay the school fees,work less and keep the kids at home.Who am I?Someone who cares about children's rights.

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You are also quite ignorant and presumptuous.




http://www.imdb.com/list/rJuB9UoASlQ/

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Again, I repeat..who do you people who write such things to a perfect stranger, think you are? There is a post below yours that calls you ignorant and presumptuous and I think that is the perfect response to you.

I will go further and call you a coward, hiding behind your anonymity to attack a stranger.

Go back to the original OP and what the question was. I answered, in general, about boarding schools, not these types of boarding schools as depicted in the film, there is a big difference.

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PC, I'm sure you know your children better than strangers on the Internet and do what's best for them. Pay no attention. There are boarding schools in America but the really well known ones like Exeter and Andover don't seem nearly as scary as the school depicted in the movie.

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Thanks for your courtesy. I know you are right re good vs. bad boarding schools. Just like anything else in life. I come from a very remote part of Australia where there are no schools for some of the population, so to board children is a way of life. And I don't judge anything I don't have first hand knowledge of.

I deduce from some of the comments on here that the posters haven't actually attended a boarding school, good or otherwise.

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My anonymity?I doubt if pc-daisy is your real name!

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Yet pc-daisy was not the one to start attacking another person's character. That said, neither were you.

At any rate, more on-topic, I don't like boarding schools much either, but I do think it's a bit simplistic to just say they're bad altogether, and/or a parent is a bad parent for sending their kid to one. That seems like altogether too much of a generalization, to me.

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There are loads in the UK - Eton(where David Cameron went to), Beneden(for girls), Rodean(for girls), etc. I think that they're perhaps not as strict or as snobby as depicted in the film nowadays. You have to have money to pay for them though - we're talking at least £10,000 a year and more.

I admit, sending a child away to school seems very alien to me(going away to university is something different), but a lot of people do it. To be honest, the way the state sector is in the UK, I don't blame any parent sending their children off to a private school.

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forget him. He's just trolling - serious or not.


😸

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That is no excuse.If you're working long hours to pay the school fees,work less and keep the kids at home.Who am I?Someone who cares about children's rights.


Your posts are absurd. I went to boarding school and got a great education, astronomically better than the one I would have received at a public high school. And yes, it was my choice. The kids who are going to boarding school generally have the choice, everyone I know did.

You really should stick to fields you have some knowledge of. I don't know what this might be, but you clearly have no business in the conversation.

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By the way, none of the people I know who went to boarding school had a choice. Maybe those who started in their teens did, but I don't even think a child under eleven can make an informed choice on such a matter. By the time they've been in a while, it's all they know.

Every time boarding schools are attacked, someone says "I went to boarding school and it did me no harm." When further challenged about why so many people hated boarding school, they usually respond along the lines that those people are weak minded or that they would have hated any school.

Ironically, they are demonstrating one of the traits of boarding school pupils without knowing it: the inability to relate to others well emotionally. Boarding school pupils tend to have their emotions packed into a ball, don't tolerate great emotions in others and generally come off as a bit aloof or even arrogant. This is because so many of them go to school young and showing any weakness is an invitation to bullies and teasing. They have to appear strong even if they are not. They become so good at this that they can even fool themselves. This all has consequences in how they handle marriages and their own children. Many wives of boarding school boys often find them very tough going. Quite a few relationships have failed because of it.

The key thing is - if you don't have time for children, don't have them. In many cases, the parents *do* have time. I know such parents who are regularly on holiday abroad or even retired in one or two cases. They send their children to boarding school because it is the done thing. In the UK, this stems a bit from empire... or working abroad.

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"Calvinism is a very liberal religious ethos." - Truekiwijoker

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When further challenged about why so many people hated boarding school, they usually respond along the lines that those people are weak minded or that they would have hated any school.


I have literally never heard anyone use this as a justification. I have also never heard anyone call those who don't like boarding school weak-minded, and having been to a boarding school I would have heard it if what you say is even remotely true.


Ironically, they are demonstrating one of the traits of boarding school pupils without knowing it: the inability to relate to others well emotionally. Boarding school pupils tend to have their emotions packed into a ball, don't tolerate great emotions in others and generally come off as a bit aloof or even arrogant.


Do you have anything remotely resembling evidence to support this?

Kids from boarding schools who go away for high school learn about living with a roommate and being independent at a young age. They actually relate to others better than kids who only interact with others in the classroom and on the athletic field. Once again, you are making assertions that are incorrect.

The bullying I saw in public schools was far worse than what I saw in the boarding school I attended. In fact every person I knew well from my area who went to boarding school, and there were quite a few, would agree that the bullying was worse.

Personally, I did not like boarding school, but the assertions you are making are ridiculous. I had a choice to go and I'm glad I did. I liked it better than I would have liked the public school I would have attended.

I think 11 is probably too young to send kids away, but by 13 I think many are capable of going off. It depends on the child, some kids are more independent than others. One thing I always saw when people came back from their first year in boarding school was increased maturity. Much like people going away to college, someone who comes back after a year in boarding school will have grown up quite a bit.

Boarding school is not right for everyone, but to criticize parents for sending kids away is beyond stupid.

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You think eleven is too young? How about seven? That still happens in some schools. Years ago children even went at four or five.

It is not "beyond stupid" to criticise parents for sending their children away. There is no love in a boarding school, it is not a real home. Teachers and matrons are no substitute for good parenting. Once you are in a boarding school dormitory, you lose privacy and have no home to retreat to.

The difference between bullying in a dayschool and bullying in a boarding school is that you are not locked in with the bullies on evenings, nights and weekends. (By the way I would HEAVILY criticise the way many schools are run not just boarding schools or private ones. But boarding schools have their own issues)

You should watch this British documentary. While you will disagree with the comments made by some of the adults, the behaviour of the children is authentic.
https://youtu.be/2uRr77vju8U

Do not assume I have no personal experience of this matter.

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You are wrong in many ways. But that has been covered. There is nothing wrong with boarding schools, the problem comes when kids are forced to go. To criticize parents for allowing kids to go is idiotic, and this is coming from someone who did not like boarding school. It works for some people, not for everyone.

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O A-hole, my A-hole?

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One of my cousins sent her son to a boarding school like this one in central Virginia, right near James Madison's plantation Montpelier. The school is called Woodberry Forest and it seemed very preppy. Many of the graduates got into top colleges (my relatives wound up at Cornell), but it seemed quite uptight and not very diverse, ethnically or culturally.

I went to his graduation and was astounded by the behavior of the audience. That was the best-behaved, most reserved graduation I've ever attended (and I go to one every year, as I teach public school). Nobody whooped, nobody cheered, no beach balls, no air horns. People barely clapped. And an amusing proportion of the graduates had numbers after their name (Richard Jones IV, John Andrews III).

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I don't think there are boarding schools that are this strict anymore, if that's what you meant. This was 1959, when authority was still respected.

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I went to public schools so I cant comment directly, but I had a roommate at a summer research program who went to Harvard and prior to that he was at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire.

Supposedly Phillips Exeter is the "best boarding school in the country" according to business insider. Here's an article about it: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-its-like-to-attend-phillips-exeter-academy-2014-11?op=1

My roommate blasted it as transforming into an open-ended discussion groups and said that most teachers dont give lectures at all. He also stated that it has turned into a liberal politically correct bastion. Both of those descriptions are at direct odds at what the movie portrays, of course he went there in the mid 1990s so that's 4 decades removed from the Dead Poet Society story.

It also went co-ed years ago, so that changes the dynamic substantially from the Dead Poets Society school.

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I went to one in the 80s, and it was very much like the school in this movie.

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Actually I wish I went to a boarding school as a kid. Anything to get away from my parents!

For who would bear the whips and scorns of Hollywood... (;-p)

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How are boarding schools any different than college?

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Yes. There are several in the New England area. I know a girl who went all of high school to one. She chose to go, as I believe most children in the US do. It gives them an edge in college I guess. Her PSAT scores got her a nearly full scholarship. Students from the area commute to the school but stay at home. She went from Texas to New England though.

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There are some same sex boarding schools left, but most of them are for girls. There are very few all boys schools left. There used to be a lot, but most went coed.

I went to boarding school and it was the best two years of my life. Somewhat like this movie but not as strict or stuffy.

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There are quite a few of them in England, mostly in the south to accommodate all the rich folk in London and Cornwall and the Home Counties. The ones for boys are usually called 'public schools'. Eton, Harrow etc.

The slightly less exclusive (but still fee-paying) ones are just called boarding schools or private schools, and tend to be filled with the children of people who made their money through business, rather than being born to land and titles. Often they'll be the children of wealthy parents who live abroad and want their children to receive an English education.

My sister briefly attended boarding school, but our father was in the army, so the army paid for most of it. From what I saw of it and heard from her about it, I would've hated it! Quite a few British Army kids end up in boarding school if their parent/s are still serving when they reach secondary school age, to save them having to change schools and disrupt their education every time their parent/s get posted to a new place.



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Yes, I know. I like it that way. Makes me look the way I feel.

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Heck I wish i went to boarding school back in the day...i wouldn't be so messed up as i am right now suffering from panic attacks - I'd learn to socialize better - and have friends - I am 43 years old; I do work; but I have not one friend... I would have also excelled further in school and I would have had counselors believe in me and tell me to achieve and go to college than the ones I had in my high school telling me that I shouldn't bother taking the SATs because I'd never make it in college so don't bother trying.... perhaps I wouldnt be overweight either so yes I do wish I did go to boarding school.

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I went to an all boys school (not a boarding school) in the late 1980s, where it was more like the movie "The Chocolate War" than "Dead Poets Society"

One thing I can say about it--- Not having girls allowed us to focus more. I was a straight A student back then, as there was no pressure to socialize, so we kept our noses in the books

Things were different when I attended a co-ed college. Grades went downhill immediately with women around. LOL

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Lonestarr, you don't know what you're talking about. I actually went to the school where this movie was filmed (in Delaware), for five years, age 12 to 17. My first three years, it was boys only; the school became coeducational my junior year. Granted, age 12 may have been a year too young to leave home, but I wouldn't trade my experiences there for anything. My parents sent me because the quality of education was far superior to what was available at the schools in my hometown. I'm in my fifties now and am still friends with many classmates; we're all normal. None of us were traumatized by our boarding school experience, beyond issues that typical teenagers everywhere are traumatized by.

Your insinuation that my parents and those of my close friends were "neglectful" and thought of us as "accessories" is insulting and uncalled for.

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