Pointless!


I haven't seen this film but have read the outline on the Wiki page. I find it funny that so many people are arguing over the implications of this movie when it so glaringly shows the ignorance of its writers and makers.
Simply put, if Christ had been decieved by Satan so that he chose another life then he would have been in the exact same position as Adam put himself in ,and therefore would need a saviour himself! Any sacrifice he made after his deception would have been worthless as regards covering over Adam's sin.
Anyone who regards themselves as a Christian must believe in the 'Ransom'. If they don't understand this most important and basic of bible teachings, then they have no real hope.

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No, you've completely misunderstood.

Christ DOESN'T choose another life in this story... He is OFFERED one by Satan, several times, and each time he REFUSES.

Satan approaches him several times in the desert, and Jesus casts him away. Satan insists that they'll "meet again".

Then, in this fictional imagining, Satan approaches Jesus (in the mind only), at his weakest point of greatest human suffering (on the cross), and offers him a beautiful human life of wife, children, work, home, family, growing old together, rather than dying this horrible death on the cross for people that don't even care about him. In the end, Jesus again RESISTS this temptation, as he did all the others, and chooses to die for mankind instead.

The final words of the novel are, "He uttered a triumphant cry: 'It is accomplished', and was as though he had said, 'Everything has begun'...."

It is a great compliment to the Gospel for those who are already familiar with it.

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"It is a great compliment to the Gospel for those who are already familiar with it."

I'm afraid you aren't one of those people as the main teaching of the ransom is apparently lost on you.
As I said, I haven't seen the film as it's obviously something that a Christian would avoid, but it's clear from the wiki article I read that the Christ character depicted had already been deceived at some point earlier, therefore he was in the same position as Adam by having listened to Satan and thus no longer perfect and unable to offer a perfect sinless life as a sacrifice for all men's sins.

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That is incorrect.

Christ in this story never sins.

Time and again, he is offered the chance to change his situation (through repeated attempted deception by Satan) and he always recognizes Satan's deceptions, and refuses them.


You've already quite made up your mind for one who has neither read the book or seen the film.

Wiki is often inaccurate.

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From Wiki:
"While on the cross, Jesus converses with a young lady who claims to be his guardian angel. She tells him that although he is the Son of God, he is not the Messiah and that God is pleased with him, and wants him to be happy. She brings him down off the cross and, invisible to others, takes him to Mary Magdalene, whom he marries. They are soon expecting a child and living an idyllic life; .......
.....Judas comes last and reveals that the youthful angel who released Jesus from the crucifixion is, in fact, Satan."

So, according to this, Christ was thoroughly deceived and even marries an imperfect sinful woman and starts a family. So as I said from the beginning, he would no longer be able to give a sinless sacrifice for our sins. Please inform yourself of basic Christian doctrine and meditate on God's word a little, rather than form an understanding through movies.

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Again, that synopsis is incorrect.

None of this actually happens.

This is vision, temptation,dream, hallucination the devil presents, that Christ rejects.

He NEVER leaves the cross.

Hence, he dies having perfectly and sinlessly completed his mission.

He does not leave the cross, marry, or any of that.

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My apologies then, I will have to take your word for it. Perhaps you can correct the article.

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Or you could just watch the film as it's really good.

It's not supposed to be taken literally, so just enjoy it for what it is.

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