Moon and the Military


The scene in town where the red haired chap talks to Birkin, asking about Moon has me confused. I've replayed the scene on DVD several times, but I can't make out what the red haired chap says after "sitting in a glass house for six months..." Was he saying Moon was supposedly homosexual and involved with smoe of his men? All I could catch was the word "buggering".

My thanks.

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Only figured out the last part is '...for buggering his batman', so I think yes Moon was homo.

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the red haired man is basically saying Moon was caught in the act with his batman (Servant),cashiered , courtmartialled ,and spent 6 months in a military prison.Glasshouse was slang for military prison.

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the man who reveals Moon's history to Tom, was a nasty piece of work in the movie...yet in the book he was a decent sort, and was known to Tom from his experiences in the war. The book was sympathetic to Moon, highlighting the hypocracy of the army for courtmarshalling him after he'd been awarded the Military Cross for bravery (saving another mans life).

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I agree, don't know why the director did so.

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he did a few strange things...no mention of Vinny and, also, he had moon say 'you'll never have it as good as this again' and then you see Tom back visiting the church when he's an auld man. Never happened in the book. It never got so maudlin. Moon wasn't that sentimental, and neither was Birkin until the end (and he still admitted he hadn't visited the place since 1920 and never would).

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I thought the movie was very sympathetic to Moon, also... not to the informant, but lots of detail has to be lost in translation to film. I felt there was no condemnation from the film (or Birkin) about Moon's homosexuality.

Vinnie is mentioned three times: at the beginning, when Birkin's having nightmares of the war and calling out for her, then when Moon asks Birkin if he's married and he says yes, her name is Vinnie, but she's left me for another chap; and then at the end, when Birkin gets a letter from Vinnie asking to get back together, Moon asks if he will, and Birkin smiles gently and replies, "I generally do."

I recently read the book and was amazed to find that I far preferred the movie: a rare thing for me, a reader. The movie is sparing and emotional with very few words. The book felt flabby after watching the film. I would love to split a bottle of wine with Pat O'Connor and discuss this picture for hours.

The end was slightly confusing to me because of the editing, making it seem as if young Birkin saw old Birkin... but I think that was unintentional.

One of my favorite films.

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No, the movie didn't condemn Moon's homosexuality, but it veared away from the book by having the salesman condemn him. Dramatic effect? After I read the book I didn't see the point.

I felt the Old Birkin seeing the young birkin at the end was a strange ending, but I feel it was intentional if somewhat misguided. Birkin looked back on himself, and saw a man who had lost something twice...his innocence thru the war from which he seemingly recovered, and his soul mate from which, it was inferred, he never recovered.

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YES...EXACTLY! The vhs is closed-captioned where you can see the words plainly. It is also written in the novel. "Buggering" is *beep*

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