Detective Williams



Just watched yesterday Blue Velvet and I would like to ask you something:
does anybody else feel that Sandy's father is... very ambiguous?

His lack of surprise when Jeffrey tells him about the ear he found... his reaction towards Jeffrey when the Yellow Man comes to the William's household...
He feels fake to me, like he's hiding something.

Maybe one of the mysteries of Blue Velvet is that he's somehow involved in the dark side of Lumberton, alongside the Yellow man and Frank Booth?


in absentia

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Nah it's just bad dialog and acting.

For every lie I unlearn I learn something new - Ani Difranco

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^ Yep this. Lynch isn't too great with dialogue.

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No way. It's a plot point. It's partly the 50s man in control thing, and partly the ambiguity thing. That's all I have to say on the subject.

If to stand pat means to resist evil then, yes, neighbour, we wish to stand pat.

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Williams`s reaction to Jeffrey bringing him the ear was pretty much played for that typically Lynchian comedic effect:

-Jeffrey (earnestly): "Coming home behind the neighbourhood, I... found an ear"
-Williams (with upbeat bonhomie): "You did?!? A human ear?"
-Jeffrey: "Yeah"
-Williams (same deadpan bonhomie): "Let`s take a look at it... yes! That`s a human ear alright!")

And I did not pick up any particularly ambiguous or suspicious notes in the detective`s overall behaviour.



"facts are stupid things" - Ronald Reagan

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The man playing Detective Williams was an amateur and yes, it was a wooden performance! I'd never heard of "George Dickerson" before this was out and now found out he is/was a writer of poetry and worked for a magazine, I think. And interestingly enough, his wife in this movie was Charles Bronson's wife in Death Wish and he played a detective in the fourth Death Wish, an even worse performance than this one!

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Maybe about the fact that he was not obviously one way or the other sort of added to the suspense.
You'd think he was on Jeffrey's side but you can't be so sure.

You can expect to be interrogated about this in the future.

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Seemed like he was a step behind with everything but it seemed like it was intentional. I didn't look at it as bad acting but instead it seemed like you weren't sure if you were supposed to trust him or not. When it is revealed he's partners with the man in the Yellow Suit, then I really thought, OH what to think!

Oh, I love a picnic. Acres and acres of sand and all of it in your food.

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You're the only person who seems to get it, that scene is cliche on purpose and super funny, Lynch does this all the time and it's obviously played for comedy.

He's always had comedy in his work, watch Twin Peaks.



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Lynch does this all the time and it's obviously played for comedy.
Yes, this is typical Lynch, with enigmatic characters reflecting both the off beat strange and the cosily familiar, frequently simultaneously🐭.

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does anybody else feel that Sandy's father is... very ambiguous?
I did too, and it's clear to me that Lynch was setting up the possibility that Sandy's father is in cahoots with the bad guys. In addition to what you noted, his reaction when Jeffrey brings him the photographs is just what you'd expect if he was on the wrong side, almost to the point of being a cliche. He asks Jeffrey who else knows about the photos, leading one to think that he's finding out if he'd have to get rid of anyone else to suppress this information.

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I like where Lynch was going with the character but it's like he lost interest for it after the Yellow coat drops by the house.

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