MovieChat Forums > Clue (1985) Discussion > Why is no one suspicious of Wadsworth?

Why is no one suspicious of Wadsworth?


Since Tim Curry speaks in his natural voice in this movie, I assume that he is not playing an American whose stifled English accent can pass for the smooth, subtly threatening sound of a criminal like he does in Annie. The guests accept Wadsworth's word that Mr. Boddy is the troublemaker and follow everything that the butler commands. It's difficult to believe that no one would realize that there is something amiss about an Englishman who makes a production of loyalty to the American government. Wadsworth repeatedly emphasizes surrounding morality, crime, and legal secrets in a country that is not his. There are many signs that the manager of the gathering is Mr. Boddy or Mr. Boddy's accomplice, yet none are grasped. Mr. Green eventually grows suspicious, but does not make the connection to a hidden identity. The plot would be more acceptable and stimulating if there were a background for how, as one of his nationality, Mr. Boddy gets the deepest, most damaging secrets available in America, and Wadsworth becomes an agent for the Federal Bureau Of Investigation.

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I don't think Wadsworth shows any great loyalty to America or its laws. I think his motivation is more about justice, and stopping the man who enslaved him, and pushed his wife to suicide. I don't think him being English would come across of strange, in fact it's actually consistent with his wife have socialist friends.

And the 6 guest were suspicious of Wadsworth at the start, as well as everyone else and everything going on in the house. When Mr. Boddy arrived there attention all shifted to him. But after his first "death" it goes back on Wadsworth, until he explains who he is, and what has been happening.

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Sandman81, why is it fitting for an Englishman's wife to be friends with socialists? I know that the guests are wary of Wadsworth in the beginning, but after dinner they seem to blindly follow the named butler. How does Mr. Boddy access so much private information about the American government when he is from another country? Why does he even bother to? Surely he realizes that digging in to illegal matters as an immigrant will greatly increase his chances of being caught.

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First of all it's only in the 3rd ending that Wadsworth is Mr. Boddy. Secondly, he may not be from England. I'm sure there are full blooded English people in America who have accents just like Wadsworth. Heck, I've met a few full blooded Americans with British Accents before and I live in Southern Illinois. But with the first and second endings Wadsworth is the good guy and not the bad guy.

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Even if Wadsworth is Mr. Boddy, is he truly the "bad guy" if he's helping the other characters along the day? I ask this as someone in America who's been accused of sounding like Tim Curry and/or Sir Laurence Olivier.

I've also hosted dinner parties.

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Don't take this the wrong way, but do you remember the 3rd ending where he threatens to kill one of them if they don't do what he says? And that he would just continue blackmailing them all? Also nothing wrong with having a British accent and being an American Citizen. Anyone who tells you otherwise can suck a bag of rocks.

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In the words of a certain plant: "I'm going to go home and sleep with my wife."

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Let me answer all your questions one at a time.

1) England has a more socialist government than ours. If they were from England than it would make sense that she had friends who were socialist.
2) When Mr. Boddy entered the room, all of their attention went to him. Wadsworth announced that in the Study Mr. Boddy would announce his intentions. Of course they're going to go. This is the man who is blackmailing them and could ruin their lives.
3) Through his informants. Beyond that, I don't know, and don't want to know. We don't need to know that for the sake of the movie. The Movie is fine without it.
4) Money. Wadsworth does say that.
5) Sure, but when you got people like Mustard, Peacock, and White who face life in prison, surely they will pay and not report you to the police.

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Oh, you mean that the English might be more likely to support the ideas behind socialism and more comfortable with people of the affiliation through theory. Since Mr. Boddy is already rich, the blackmail has more to do with power than money. That is one of the reasons why there should be more information about how an Englishman easily manages to tinker with illegal American activities and carry on until no one below the level of the Federal Bureau Of Investigation can stop him, which I find highly unrealistic. A background story is not needed for the comedy, but it would give the movie more substance and make it more believable.

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They should already be suspicious of him just for the fact that he invited all of them, knew all kinds personal information about his guests and people around them started dropping dead.

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