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This cartoon was the first TV version of the Hulk that ...


was both decently produced and very faithful to the source material. This Saturday-morning series (with a great opening sequence!) had solid animation, voicing, and scoring. It was kind of a homage to the early Hulk comicbooks of the '60s in which physicist Bruce Banner is stationed at a Southwestern military base (consistently depicted in this cartoon as an Army base; nobody here wore Air Force blues) and his Hulk problem is still a secret. The Hulk and Dr. Banner here are very close to the definitive versions found in Marvel Comics. The show actually improved upon some characters from the Hulk comicbooks: Rick Jones (youthful sidekick to the Hulk and accidental catalyst for his origin) was given a cowboy look and interest in a Mexican restaurateur's hot daughter; Betty Ross (Gen. Ross' daughter and the love of Banner's life) was made one of the scientists working with Banner; Maj. Talbot was made a frequent source of comic relief (helped by his first name being changed from Glenn in the comics to Ned so that the cartoon's base troops could mock him as "Noodlehead Ned"). Still, this incarnation of "The Incredible Hulk" could have been considerably better. The writers allowed for two things that hurt the quality of the show's stories: absurd Hulk-to-Banner transformations (whenever Hulk changed back to Banner clothing that had been torn or even ripped away magically reformed over Banner's body!) and underuse of supervillains from the Hulk comicbooks (The show used the Leader once but never used other great Hulk supervillains, such as the Abomination, Zzzax, the Rhino, and the U-Foes. In contrast, companion series "Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends" used quite a few supervillains strongly associated with the comicbook Spider-Man.).

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Indeed the whole "magical clothes reappearing thing" was dumb but this was a great show, try watching "Trial of the Incredible Hulk" for seeing David Banner's beard magically disappear with no reason when he Hulks out then reappears when he becomes Banner again.

"It's the Stay-Puft Marshmellow Man!"-Ghostbusters.

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For me this is the definitive screen adaptation of the Hulk to date. The 90s show had superior animation but the storylines were more gung-ho and they didn't have the characterisation of the 80s show.

For instance, in the 80s show Betty Ross is an intelligent, confident and assured woman... whereas in the 90s show, she was just made into a whinging, helpless blonde bimbo!

Ditto for She-Hulk's character. In the 90s show, she was so annoying with her flirtatious, seductive way of talking instead of the no-nonsense lady in the 80s show.

I'm amazed how the 80s show has been completely forgotten bar the few that have posted on this board. Stan Lee himself narrated the show - why hasn't he canvassed for a DVD release?!

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I still have my VHS copies of this show... My grandfather used to make me bootleg VHS in the early 80's and he would film intros before the shows with me and my kid sister running around saying, "Now were gonna watch the incredible Hulk!".

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I have all the episodes taped off TV when they were running on Sky One's 'DJ Kat Show'. There were annoying ad breaks in-between though, and although I used to pause and unpause, there was still the annoying DJ Kat jingle before the ads!

And I'm still missing 3 episodes - Origin of the Hulk, Cyclops and Prisoner of the Hulk. Have looked on Ebay but can only find one PAL copy of episodes I already have.

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In response to shaker-maker's Stan Lee comments on this board: It's disappointing that while Stan appears in DVDs for '90s Hulk and Spider-Man cartoons, he apparently has no interest in getting DVD releases for '80s Marvel cartoons he had more to do with (providing narration) - "The Incredible Hulk" and (the longer-running, better known) "Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends".

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Stan has absolutely no control over stuff like that. It's between Disney and Marvel.

Still got my fingers crossed, waiting for Judas Contract to get green-lit


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At least those seemingly magical moments in the "Trial" Hulk telefilm can be explained away: the beard David Banner had grown was not part of the Hulk persona of his body, so the beard fell out during the Hulk-out and rapidly regrew during the Hulk-in (thanks to the same regenerative power that accelerated the Hulk's recovery from many injuries over the years). There's no explaining how once in the regular live-action show Banner had on socks and shoes right after the Hulk turned back into him! That's really similar to the reforming-clothes silliness found throughout this cartoon.

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I liked this show. I used to watch it on VHS as a kid. I bought a VHS of it when I was a kid but it doesn't work anymore. I wish I could've bought the VHS copies my Blockbuster had.

"We are Venom, now!" Venom/Eddie Brock Spider-Man Tv Series 1994

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