MovieChat Forums > Visiting Hours (1982) Discussion > WHY is Lee Grant in this film????

WHY is Lee Grant in this film????


Baffles me why she signed on to do this.

Perhaps it wasn't a slasher-film when she began, and the gore was added later.

And this cost over 5 million to make!?

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Lee Grant decided to do this picture because I wrote it for her, and she and I wanted to do something intriguing. If you look beyond the gore, every seven pages required, you will see that this is a movie about women struggling for power in a man's world. She and I designed this ourselves as a reason to do it. Look closely: Michael Ironside is seen in quarter light in the first part, then half light, then full light. He represented the forces that were holding back women at that time. Lee Grant and I had worked before and she trusted me. She and I were happy with what we did. I was signed to scare people, and I wanted Lee to do the picture. She agreed if we could make a statement on which to hang the scares. We did, we were happy, those who were looking for something behind the violence were happy. The picture works, made a fortune, has a cult following because good horror is about SOMETHING. It is not meaningless violence. When you write that way, as I have done for all the scary movies I have done, the audience senses something is going on behind the fear...and they are right. Brian Taggert

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I gotta hand it to ya. I let this movie fly under my radar for years. I finally picked up the DVD and I was amazed. This movie has everything the American slashers of that time period lacked. Excellent performances, thought-provoking subtext. Instead of having teenage girls plucked off one by one in various stages of undress, it features women of different ages and backgrounds, all of which are very unique characters, all of which respond in their own way to the killer. That's just something you don't see in US slashers of the time.

And Michael Ironside is just f'n creepy in this. I've always liked him and think he's good at playing sleazy in an effective way, but this just takes the cake. The first scene made me scream out loud.

It will end again in bullets, friend

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Sitedecinema,

I explained the genesis of this picture and why it enjoyed success. The question was asked why Lee Grant, a grand actress, was in this film. I guess you are too dim to comprehend, or too dull-witted to see what was going on between the lines. Lee and I had vision how to make it work, and we were right. Best you concentrate on slasher films that throw guts at the screen as that seems to be the depth of your understanding and intelligence.

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Sitedecinema, Thank you for clearing that up. I was surprised as I didn't know what I had said to ignite such a response. Glad you liked the movie. How long ago did you write the letter?

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LOL this is one of her best movies from that era. Apparently you missed The Swarm and Mafu Cage.

It will end again in bullets, friend

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Yeah she was slumming somewhat. But then, so was William Shatner. I think she needed to make a couple of mortgage payments and someone approached her with "Visiting Hours".







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"I don't mind that she did this film, but I do mind that she agreed to do crap like The Swarm, the horrible Airport sequel, and the god-awful TV horror movie The Spell, in which she has to make things fly around a room by the power of her mind! "--damonstrongproductions


Well, I'll say it again. She must have needed to make a few mortgage payments. I can not believe she thought these projects were milestone in her acting career. The pressure of those mounting mortgage bills....














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[deleted]

I can see why she would do "The Spell", as it had a great deal to do about women's images. The overweight daughter is an outcast. The younger, prettier daughter is Daddy's darling, while the intelligent but difficult daughter can do no right in his eyes. Grant's mother is supportive and understanding, and, as we find out, she knows what her daughter is dealing with and getting herself into. It focuses a lot on that mother/daughter relationship. It also shows society's views of various females.

I don't mean to lecture, but I didn't want to see "The Spell" dismissed in that way. I like the power struggle that happens at the last. They later went for that sort of scene in "Midnight Offerings": mother vs. daughter.

I'm sure that actors have to do a certain amount of work to pay bills, but some projects we see as throwaway might be taken for additional reasons. Some actors appear in "lesser" movies in order to help beginner filmmakers. Look how often Eric Stoltz and Bob Balaban show up in all types of projects. Plus, many actors love to work and realize not all projects are going to be admirable. However, some actors' presence does elevate the importance of a film, such as those low-budget ones made by Boris Karloff. BECAUSE Karloff is in them, they became notable films and available when they otherwise might slip into the oblivion of those movies that don't develop a cult following. *ouch* I've babbled quite enough, haven't I? I'll probably return and delete this. (I hate people calling me names and/or making fun of me. I'm just not thickskinned enough for the Net.)

~~MystMoonstruck~~

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Awesome insights cynsemele!




In response to:


"I'm sure that actors have to do a certain amount of work to pay bills, but some projects we see as throwaway might be taken for additional reasons. Some actors appear in "lesser" movies in order to help beginner filmmakers. Look how often Eric Stoltz and Bob Balaban show up in all types of projects. Plus, many actors love to work and realize not all projects are going to be admirable. However, some actors' presence does elevate the importance of a film, such as those low-budget ones made by Boris Karloff. BECAUSE Karloff is in them, they became notable films and available when they otherwise might slip into the oblivion of those movies that don't develop a cult following. "--cynsemble



Live Full & Die Empty. Tap Your Potential and Realise Your Dreams!

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BECAUSE Karloff is in them, they became notable films
and available..


I wouldn't have bought Voodoo Island if Karloff wasn't in it,
nor enjoyed Mad Monster Party as much. Still haven't watched
VI but still..

Never thought I'd see a passionate defense of The Spell.
I only caught it earlier this year thanks to THISTV Network and
I enjoyed it but never gave any thought to it being more than a
Carrie ripoff. I enjoyed your post & as I sit here editing
mine to be literate I assure you yours isn't *babble*

Anyway, as a result of the OP's snobbishness I took a look
at Lee Grant's bio and discovered she was blackballed by the
McCarthy panderers for refusing to testify in the witchhunt
aganst her husband, is an accomplished director and producer
and is mom to Dinah Manoff whom I've crushed on
ever since Empty Nest.

Just to be safe: Spoilers frome here on out!

I don't get why people say this is misogynistic. It's not like Colt
gets away with it and the guy that wrote this movie has answered the
OP most soundly on the matter. So a few things about this movie, which
I liked enough that I intend to buy the new DVD this fall.

-Lee Grant makes a better Nancy Grace than Nancy Grace does because she
doesn't come off as pompous and screechy

-Linda Purl is very pretty; she has very thin nostrils though, either
that or it's the camera angle

-It was a nice surprise when I realized "Oh, we're going
to follow Sheila now for awhile" and she wasn't just there
to up the body count. Basically has 2 female leads

-I like that Colt doesn't say much

-That blond chick really trashed Colt's appartment,
another unexpected development. And her payback lead to his being
exposed. I wouldn't say downfall because the police didn't take him out.

-It was a little anticlimactic. I thought the ending
would have been more fitting if they found themselves in the kitchen
and Deborah comes across a big frying vat or pot filled with hot oil..

(nevermind that hospitals don't serve deep fried food & even if they
did, why would a fryer fulla hot oil be left going in a deserted kitchen;
maybe a desserted kitchen , but certainly not a deserted one)

-my one question is why did Colt slip into Deborah's operating room?
He obviously couldn't do anything with everyone around at the time so
I assume it was just to scare and torment her, letting her see he was in
there just before she goes under. Bet it gave her a nightmare.

-Captain Kirk is a noisy eater. I'm a fan of William Shatner but
one scene is slightly annoying the way it was written. Look at it
from Deborah's perspective. She's just awoken from surgery, still
groggy obviously, and there Gary is, not sitting quietly in a chair
at her bedside. No, he's hunched over her tray/table a few feet from
her face, managing to somehow noisily eat a sundae. He
seriously CLOMPS! the spoon with every bite.


As far as horror movies set in hospitals I liked it much better
than Halloween II.



You got your pint, you got your pig snacks, what more do you want?

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I didn't think Visiting Hours was that well directed,including the final scene of the killer reaching out for Lee's pants; the composition was off. However, excellent performances from all.

The issue with The Spell is more from a business aspect of feature-film actors doing mediocre tv films,and the potential damage to their image. If The Spell was a tv-film of a higher status,it'd be different.

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Ah, you take a look at tons of movies from the 70s to early 80s there were TONS of old school actors that got back in the game with the countless disaster movies and cheesy horror movies. So to call Grant out for stuff like this is a bit unfair. Just look at all the old vets in stuff like Earthquake and When Time Ran Out. LOL.. Easy paydays to get people that grew up watching them back to the theatres.

But I remember back in the day Siskel and Ebert doing a special show called "Women in Trouble" talking about the craze of all the slasher pictures. This one hit the nail on the head. The typical action of going after women then they try to use some lame shrink point of view to try and cover for it being a typical slasher film as if they're helping the world with some sort of profound social message!

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However, Grant was not really in a career-funk,so this film seemed misplaced. She had won an Oscar only 5 years earler.

Perhaps it started out as a decent thriller,but gone awry; that could relate to Siskel & Ebert's commentary. What is on good on paper can be later trashed by the studio/editing.

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What makes you think this was a slasher?

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