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Does Jack realize that he lies to Wendy about room 237?


Jack tells Wendy that there is nothing out of the ordinary in room 237. Is he unable to remember the woman whom he touches because of the traumatic disgust that follows, or is it a matter of Jack purposely lying due to the influence of the hotel?

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Of course he knew he lied. Ive always been convinced of that, especially what he experienced in that room.

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Thank you, Washingtonnative. Jack's delivery of the information is very sketchy and awkward, which is why it's hard to tell what his mind is focused on in the moment.

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At that point I think he knows he is losing his mind and believes it was a hallucination. But he does not want to lose the job so he is trying to work through what happened and keep Wendy from catching on or wanting to leave. Of coarse she wants to leave anyway so he snaps.

The way Jack breaks it to Wendy seems like he is trying to lead her somewhere with his story and manipulate her into a predetermined outcome. Perhaps he thinks she will simply keep a better eye on Danny.

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Thank you, Lord Rake. That is an insightful suggestion. When you say that Jack is trying to create his own outcome, do you mean that he is setting Wendy for the attempted murders because of the hotel's spirit, or that he is just trying to force her in to staying at the place so that he can get the money?

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One side of Jack thinks he is going to write an amazing novel. That side is just trying to keep her from over reacting and leaving, which would definitely screw up his opportunity to finish/start the book.
I think the other side of Jack knows that he's never going to write a novel and is after some bloodlust.

I'm not sure the ghosts are even necessary. What do you think would happen if the overlook was a normal hotel? What happens when it's April and Jack hasn't written a single page?

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Are you saying that Jack's frustration with life in general is merging with the spirit of the hotel because the power of the two are coinciding?

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I think violent Jack was going to come out anyway when the job was over and no novel had been written. The hotel is just hastening the process to coalesce with its party. Perhaps the position offered attracts a certain type of person to the Overlook.

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That is a sharp extension to the story. You have a broad perspective for it and are bringing out a somewhat overlooked element: Jack's natural mental state. This raises the important question of whether or not Jack would eventually lose his already unstable mind if he were to not stay at the resort. There is a possibility of that, but since The Overlook Hotel possesses the writer, he would not have the same radical, murderous demonstration if he weren't there. I can imagine Jack flying in to a rage and accidentally killing someone, though.

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I thhink he's so used to lying to Wendy that he does it automatically.

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Chad move.

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Otter, even though Jack has no respect for Wendy, I don't think that he regularly lies to her. He is always brutally honest and has a harsh presentation for everything.

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I think if Jack told the truth, it would compel Wendy to want to leave the hotel and Jack did not want that.

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Thank you, andreaahr. You believe that Jack is lying on his own accord. That could be true, and if it is, then it's a chief component of the writer's rage when Wendy says that she wants to leave the resort. His cover has been in vain.

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I always took it as the hotel's influence. Either it made him forget or made him lie.

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