MovieChat Forums > To Serve Them All My Days Discussion > Carter should have apologies to Davey

Carter should have apologies to Davey


Carter should have been force to write a letter of apology to Davey after Carter made remarks about the Kremiln, Reds, and Bolsheviks and his remarks about Davey being disloyal to the country particulary after what Davey went through in the trenches. Frankly, Carter deserve to get hit in the face and since he plays tennis, I wonder how bad his knees really were to prevent him from going into the trenches.


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Haha, it's been a while since I've seen the series, so I'll have to pull out my DVDs again soon, but I empathize with your point of view. Carter treated Davey quite badly , but as often was the case, Davey let his temper get the better of him. IIRC, the two of them came to an understanding eventually and Carter did express remorse before moving on from Bamfylde, is that right? As I said, I'll have to rewatch to check -- which will be a treat!

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Carter should have learn to keep his mouth shut, not push his luck, and listen to what other people have to say. He was lucky that he did not run across a war veteran who would have send him to the hospital with severe bodily injuries.

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In his letter to David (in which he accepts David's written apology), Carter does admit that it was unprofessional of him to both lose his temper AND make the remark that he did in the laboratory - i.e., referring to David's house as "the Kremlin." So that was an apology of sorts.

And of course, if David had approached Carter calmly and asked him not to refer to his house in such a way - especially in front of the students - I have no doubt Carter would have formally apologized.

But I've always been glad David lost his temper, because otherwise we wouldn't have had such a dynamite confrontation between the two; I think the scene where they square off is excellent. And it was believable their characters would lose it, especially considering their divergent political views and the lingering emotions churned up by the general strike.

The way in which the two began as adversaries and eventually formed an alliance was one of the most interesting aspects of "To Serve Them All My Days."

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Just posting to say that I'm glad someone is still watching this tremendous series. They don't make 'em like this anymore - long series that take time to develop. Andrew Davies (who wrote the screenplay) is currently trying to cram War and Peace into eight episodes!




If there aren't any skeletons in a man's closet, there's probably a Bertha in his attic.

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