Cinematography


Does anyone else here get an upset stomach while watching Norma Rae due to the cinematography? It's definitely dated, but also seems ... strange, somehow.

" ... after only reading 3 of your posts, I can tell you're a dumbass ... "

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...not only is it NOT strange, but it is perfect at achieving what the film aims for: a sense of gritty, sweaty, documentary-style realism and energy and excitement and power.



"In your eyes, the light, the heat; in your eyes, I am complete"- Peter Gabriel

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Strange? OP, what are you, 12 years old? This was how people dressed in the 70s and early 80s, that was how things looked... there's nothing strange about it. The quality might be not as pristine and HD as modern films, but I find that refreshing... all this high definition garbage these days is what is really stomach upsetting. It reveals too much and going to the cinema can be an assault on the senses because everything looks too 'real' and 'clean' to the point of being sterile. There was beauty in grain and 35mm film. I don't understand the modern day obsession with high def everything.

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Somehow I'm finding my self agreeing with you while disagreeing completely.

I feel that there is greater definition in a film like NORMA RAE than in any movie today. I hate the look of today's films. The image is so processed that it looks pixelated to my eyes. The image looks distorted. NORMA RAE and other higher quality movies from this era, on the other hand, have a "realness" to them, like I could reach through my screen and touch that world.

I think we are agreeing, but our supporting arguments are completely contradictory. :-)

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To me Norma Rae seemed distorted

Idk how to explain it

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12 years old? No

I simply asked a question

That's fine if you don't agree, but in the future just say so

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I think the cinematography was meant to look grainy and handheld, like a documentary.

Movie critics aren't biased. You're just a fanboy.

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I like its gritty authenticity. Everything looks like a dark Polaroid print from that time period. It's perfect for the mood of the film!

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What would give you an upset stomach is the lighting in a textile mill. It's green; thoroughly unnatural and makes everyone look sickly. I never worked on the floor of a mill, but in the same building, and had to walk through the weaving room from time to time. John Alonzo was a great DP and he got that greenish cast just right. Most houses are poorly lit e.g., Norma Rae's; and most motel rooms are bathed in the orange haze of incandescent lights. I think Alonzo did his usual quality work here.

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You put into words my thoughts - thank you!

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