MovieChat Forums > From Here to Eternity Discussion > Why are there two TV series of this?

Why are there two TV series of this?


IMDB has two versions of this mini series. They have almost identical casts, the other one is here

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080220/

surely there can't really be two, one with Natalie Wood and one without her?

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[deleted]

the one with Natalie Wood (from '79) was a remake of the 1953 movie and the one from '80 was a continuation of that. Barbara Hershey played the character that Natalie Wood had before she died.

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The mini series was such a success that they turned it into a series but would did not want to commit to a television series and she she opted not to do it. The series only lasted one season and would died a year after its cancellation.

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[deleted]

If you read the novel you would still be waiting for somebody to get it right.

PFC Bloom, a Jewish member of the boxing team and a key figure of the story was incorporated with the mangled English speaking immigrant Sgt Galovich in the film and disappeared completely in the TV shows. Maybe his unintentional suicide was too much for the film and TV people. They also probably had nightmares about Captain Holmes giving his wife venereal disease causing her to have a hysterectomy.

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PFC Bloom, a Jewish member of the boxing team and a key figure of the story was incorporated with the mangled English speaking immigrant Sgt Galovich in the film and disappeared completely in the TV shows. Maybe his unintentional suicide was too much for the film and TV people.


unintentional suicide? There wasn't anything in the scene of Bloom in the barracks, thinking about his life, getting the rifle, and ultimately putting it in his mouth, pulling the trigger, and blowing his own head off that characterized or even hinted that him going through these steps was anything less than completely intentional. Maybe you were thinking about how Bloom, as he went through the deliberate steps of getting ready to do it, was hoping someone would come in before he did it, or how the split second after he pulled the trigger, his still-functioning brain was frantically regretting the act....but neither of those things equate to the act being unintentional---because it clearly was. He had work out too many contortions of his body (down to the movements of his unsocked toes) to make it work with the rifle he used, to even possibly be a mistake or accident, and his thoughts along the way pretty well spell out his misery. If there had been any doubt at all up to that point, Jones even has the character holding the rifle barrel in his mouth while holding his other arm extended out, holding the butt end of it, and then, setting the butt end of the concrete floor because, he thinks to himself, "these '03s had a hell of a kick." It all read, to me, as if he was running through steps he'd already thought in his mind several times before. One of the most affecting, powerful, and sad scenes I've ever read in any novel...

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