The ending


I don't know if anyone has any thoughts about the endings - I don't even know if anyone reads this board - but if you do, I'd love to hear them.

*** SPOILERS ***
On some level, I just can't get why Thomas would commit suicide when things were looking up with Martin. I know he had difficulties and was struggling when Martin found him at the train station, struggling even with Martin because of everything he's been through, but it's odd (and yet somehow rings true) that Thomas would go through hell and not try to kill himself, only to do so after being reunited and reconciled with the man he loved. The only possible explanation for this that I have is that he might have wanted to pass away not due to the bad things he has been through, but because of the bad things he feared would come after this, wanting to maintain that good moment that they had and not have to lose it again.

I feel for both of them. Incredibly sad, whatever way you look at it.

I used to have a , but damnit do I want a !

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I just saw this movie today and loved it. It's 100-times better than the manipulative tearjerker Brokeback Mountain. I got the impression that Thomas did not die from his suicide attempt, but was revived, was visited by Martin in the hospital, and then ran away from the hospital; (hence the news report about his disappearance). In any case, I thought the ending was perfect and inevitable, because it's about the impossibility of preserving perfection, in relationships or in life. Martin will always love Thomas, but Thomas is wounded beyond Martin's ability to help, and he will most likely continue his cycle of self-destruction until he becomes like the people who tormented him or until he succeeds in killing himself. But to address your question, I thought he was suicidal because he hadn't lived up to Martin's loyalty, was ashamed of how he behaved in the boys' home, and having resorted to prostitution, etc.

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I thought he was suicidal because he hadn't lived up to Martin's loyalty, was ashamed of how he behaved in the boys' home, and having resorted to prostitution, etc.
It makes sense and if you think that he was in denial about how ashamed he felt when he was on his own, but then Martin's presence wouldn't allow him to repress anymore, than it also explains why then and not at an earlier (and more difficult, from an objective angle) point in time.

Thank you!

I used to have a , but damnit do I want a !

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I think that Thomas tried to commit suicide because he felt like damaged goods.

Only after seeing his first lover again did he realize just how "ruined" he felt.

I'm NOT sure how he would have had the determination to escape from the hospital at the end though. I've not read the book and don't know how it ends but the fact that both lovers don't end up DEAD just for the unforgiveable sin of being homosexual was progressive for 1977.

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I agree with Havan IronOak. In the conversation scene that occurs when Martin and Thomas have reunited toward the end of the movie, it is clear to me that Thomas felt like he was damaged. He was destroyed emotionally, psychologically, and physically. When Martin reunited with him at the train station, Thomas looked worn out and on the brink of collapsing from the weight on his shoulders. When they are at the apartment, it's as though Thomas was trying to convince himself that the things he did to fit in while at the reformitory, were normal, but he could no longer do that because as another poster said, Martin's presence wouldn't let him convince himself any longer, so the true feeling of being damaged came to the surface and he couldn't deal with it anymore.






"Stop grinning like a psycho, and get back to work." Doakes, on Dexter

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