MovieChat Forums > The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977) Discussion > The fight scenes with the animals

The fight scenes with the animals


*spoilers* for some.

I wanna know how they did some of the fight scenes with the real animals and also if any of the animals were hurt as a result. A few times really stand out like when the bear-man goes over the balcony with the panther and when the tiger goes through the roof window into the fire.

Also were any of the stuntmen hurt? it all looked pretty risky.

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[deleted]

Thought that might be the case as some of the stunts looked pretty serious..

Cheers.

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[deleted]

Those replies were deleted, I watched this film for the first time last night and a lot of the animal/human stunts looked very dangerous. I'm sure a few people or animals were hurt during filming or else they're just very lucky.

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[deleted]

Both BearMan and the Panther survived well, perhaps the panther more so than the Bearman - actually there were no large mishaps on the shoot - thanks for the 'fanship', David Cass (Bearman)

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Thanks a lot for replying to this! I'm glad to hear no actors or animals were hurt.

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Hello all who care about animals (that includes stuntpersons)
I was present during the entire filming of The Island of Dr. Moreau, at Davis Bay, in St Croix, US Virgin Islands. All the Animals were supplied by the enchanted Villages, of California, and all of them were a pure joy to work with. I personally wresteled with the Bear AKA Gentle Ben, and also spent time with the cats. I was amazed, how during the rehearsals, the Cats were more than eager to jump thru the "Glass" skylights". The veterinary care on site was superb, none of the animals were injured in the least, and all the actors were fine as well. On top of that, the USDA cleared the animals into StCroix, and kept them Quarantined at a facility, especially constructed for the occasion at Davis Bay. Mr Bent Lawaetz, then of the VI Dept of Agriculture was on site daily,to ensure that all was well with the animals. Ralph and Tony Helfer expanded on a training method, that they called "Affection training", something that I have used since then in dealing with all kinds of wild animals, to great success. (I am 61 now, and the only animal inflicted wounds I carry, are from multiple spider bites on my chest, acquired while sleeping in Costa Ricas Rainforest. Barbara Carrera was simply stunningly gorgeous in this film.

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That is very cool of you to supply that information. This film's production history is not easy to find out about, and that's a shame because this easily ranks with some of the "Planet of the Apes" sequels. The animal life is especially impressive in the movie! You should write more if you have the time; this is a classic of the genre and people want to know about it!

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tropses: i am glad to read that.i have not seen the movie,but if i hadnt read what you just wrote,i would have tought that this was another of those 70's kill animal movies. thank you for those words

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Yeah, Thanks tropseas, for sharing that info!!!

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I saw this when it came out, but it was on a later viewing that I realized just how incredible the final sequence with the escaping animals was. I've never seen any more impressive animal stunts, just fantastic.

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thanks for posting this. i had always been curious about the animal sequences in this film.

http://fanholespodcast.blogspot.com/

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Thanks for the info.

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I came on to see about this as well. I just don't know how they had wild cats chasing things like the bulls and such and for the animals not to be hurt. I was horrified and relieved to know everybody was okay. đŸ˜„

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I don't think they started placing the disclaimer that "no animals where injured or killed in the making if this film" at the end of films after than this (early 80's?).

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