Friday the 13th music


I'm not 100% its F13, but i just watched "Blue Sunshine" and the music that is played when the people are going nuts sounded so familiar. And i think it was from F13(which was done 4 or 5 years after this). I guess i need to grab my bluray and find out if i'm right. If someone is more familiar with F13 and BS, listen to the music in a few scenes, the end mall scene is an example and let me know if it similar to what they used in F13.

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If it was done five years BEFORE F13, how could the music possibly FROM F13th? I think what you mean to say is that F13 ripped off the music from BS? That could be.

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I didn't mean they ripped it from F13, i meant the reason the music sounded familiar to me was that it was the same music from F13. Obviously if Blue Sunshine came out years before then it couldn't rip F13 off. I just saw F13 first so to me it sounded like the music from F13. I'm not saying its bad if F13 did take the music from Blue Sunshine, Re-Animator is my favorite horror flick of all time and it ripped the music off of Psycho.

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I still don't quite understand how Re-Animator was able to get away with that (without getting sued, etc.) And I'm a huge fan of the film too, but it was 1000% obvious they weren't exactly 'paying tribute' to Psycho with their soundtrack - they were ripping it off.

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I agree. Like i said I love Re-Animator but it was obvious the guy who wrote it(one of the Bands, don't think it was Charles) clearly ripped off it off. I know I've seen interviews with Stuart Gordon said he wanted something like Psycho's music and the guy delivered. Heck yeah he delivered he gave you the same damn thing.
Still great flick though.

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Re-Animator is a satire, and when you are satirizing you can get away with a lot. It was clear to me ever since I first saw the film that they were poking fun at the Psycho score in a very loving way. That, combined with the fact that Bernard Herrmann was long dead by the time the movie came out, and also that people were much less likely to sue over things like that back then, explains why no one bothered to go after them for it.

As for Blue Sunshine, I can definitely hear the similarity you speak of with the score of Friday the 13th. Funny that you brought up the Psycho score because that score influenced most of the horror film scores that came after it -- including Blue Sunshine and Friday the 13th. I think it's just a coincidence that they sound similar, what with both of them being string-based scores. Psycho, of course, was one of the first, if not THE first score composed entirely of strings.

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Funny you guys should bring up Bernard Herman because he was my first choice for 'Squirm' and he was very interested, but he died right at that time. Obviously nothing about BLUE SUNSHINE-- score included-- could have been derivative of any movie that came after it (in fact, I wish that as a filmmaker, I could do that-- time warp future homages that would be perceived in he present as 'original ideas') but I can attest to the fact that the composer of BS, Charles Gross, had no background nor particular interest in horror genre movies when he took the BLUE SUNSHINE gig. His score, from HIS perspective, was 100 percent original, that is, he just sat down at his baby grand and composed it, just like he approached anything else. I've heard so many movies, and now TV series, using so many things he laid down back then that it doesn't even bother me anymore, just like I'm sure... or I hope.. the heirs of Bernard Herman don't freak out when they hear those 'scare strings' used over and over.

Thanks for your ongoing interest, and insight, in BLUE SUNSHINE after all these years. I truly appreciate it. Celebrating the 35th anniversary in fact with all new artwork and interview with yours truly,

Jeff Lieberman

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Funny you guys did NOT bring up Henry Manfredini, the composer of "Friday The 13th." I too noticed that some of the cues in, "Blue Sunshine" are reminiscent of "Friday's" Score. Especially towards the end in the Mall. While I was watching, I thought it was just my ears playing tricks on me. This thread does seem to miss the connection between, "The Children" score (1980) and "Friday The 13th's" score (also 1980)... being that they are identical. I'm guessing that Manfredini figured no one would see "The Children," or "Friday," for that matter, and just edited the existing tracks to fit "Friday." This fact is sited several times on "The Children's" page of IMDb. We all love the score (of a bunch of cues) from "Friday The 13th!" Otherwise, we wouldn't hear its "influence" in other scores.

Hope you and yours are Happy. Read my Reviews and please make comments, Neal.

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If 'Friday the 13th' was made in 1980 and Blue Sunshine was made in 1977, how could the cues from 'Blue Sunshine' be 'reminiscent' of "Friday's' score? Obviously it would be the other way around.

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Yeah.

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<<I still don't quite understand how Re-Animator was able to get away with that (without getting sued, etc.) >>

Well, first you're assuming the producers of Re-Animator weren't sued. Just because it didn't make big headlines doesn't mean it didn't happen. A lot of times, lawsuits are settled out of court rather quickly (largely as the result of the lawsuit involving George Harrison's My Sweet Lord, the proceedings of which went on for more than 2 decades).

I recall that the Raymond Scott estate intended to bring legal action against the band Rush, because they quote Scott's piece Powerhouse in their instrumental La Villa Strangiato. The actual circumstances (pun intended) are a bit vague to me, but I gather that the statute of limitations prevented them from going forward with legal action. I do however understand that Rush ended up voluntarily giving a big wad of money to the Scott estate as remuneration.

Apparently, they borrowed the riff from the old Looney Tunes cartoons, and I guess they knew it wasn't actually composed by Carl Stalling (who was credited the musical arrangements for the Looney Tunes) but they were unable to ascertain in 1978 who the composer was. I guess they figured once the Hemispheres album came out, someone would come afford and elucidate on the true provenance of the motif in question.

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