MovieChat Forums > French Connection II (1975) Discussion > Should Popeye be charged with the murder...

Should Popeye be charged with the murder of Charnier?


Hell - he just he gunned him down in cold blood at the end of the movie. Charnier was just standing on a boat not threatening anyone!!. We're left with the feeling that popeye "got his man" but i didn't like that ending.

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I would gun him down too.

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It was a damn good shot nonetheless.

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Charnier got what he deserved. Don't think that Popeye will be charged cause the crew of the yact will throw Charnier out somewhere on the sea and will trying to escape to another country.

"Well, nobody's perfect."

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I'm a social liberal who supports the legalization of drugs, and this is one of my favorite film endings of all time.

Doyle did what he had to. Charnier wasn't just a drug peddler, he was a murderer and kidnapper who would have escaped justice had Doyle not iced him then and there.

Also, it's just a movie.

http://ocdviewer.wordpress.com

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I'm a liberal, socialist, pacifist who is glad that he lives in a relatively gun crime free country and that police are not armed.

I think more fictional criminal masterminds should get blown away in hollywood movies. There just isn't enough of it.

In fact I think I've only see it in, oh... just about every single cop drama made in the past 40 years.

Long may it continue.

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Of course, Charnier's murder (or execution, or termination, or whatever euphemism you choose) is highly illegal, but the Doyle character exists specifically to commit this type of act which the local authorities would be unable to perform themselves. The real-life person upon which the Charnier character is based allegedly had personal connections to Charles De Gaulle; As a foreigner the Doyle character is morally absolved and politically immune; the Charnier character has been exposed as a criminal and is thus no longer protectable; in all likelihood Doyle would simply be quickly and quietly deported lest a national scandal ensue.
From the standpoint of cinema, the Charnier killing provides suitable, shocking climax on the same order of 'The French Connection', and brings the story-arc to a definitive finale; Doyle has destroyed every other aspect of his antagonist's enterprise, and therefore has only this final act to perform.
From the standpoint of drama, the act is perfectly in character for Doyle, who has endured terrible privation at Charnier's hands; his act is one of vengeance and retribution, which traditionally transcends Law in drama, and especially in film. The murder is morally troubling, just as are the shootings of Nicoli (shot in the back to prevent escape) and Mulderig (wrong place at the wrong time, at least for him) in the first film. Doyle is a morally troubling figure who is 'set up' by his superiors basically as a foreign assassin. This is the central point of the film series, that we, as society, place people like Doyle into these positions, to maintain our moral purity and absolve ourselves of his actions.

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Doyle is a morally troubling figure who is 'set up' by his superiors basically as a foreign assassin. This is the central point of the film series, that we, as society, place people like Doyle into these positions, to maintain our moral purity and absolve ourselves of his actions.


Good post, I think Doyle even says that he was "set up" at some point during the film

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Doyle doesn't appear to get in much trouble for killing cops, conducting demented car chases, getting informants killed, becoming a junkie, setting fire to buildings or much other assorted lunacy. Don't think anyone's gonna blink twice at him for shooting a criminal mastermind in cold blood. ;)

Love the movies though.

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Great Comment Adam!!!

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i would give doyle a medal and have chanier publicly hanged and quartered.

no thought, no reflection, no analysis, no cultivation, no intention, let it settle itself.

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I don't think he would be charged with murder but maybe a mild reprimand for interfering with French police business. Charnier was fleeing a crime scene and resisting arrest. There was a book written based on the screenplay and in it after Charnier was killed the French detective said goodbye to Popeye at the airport when he was going back to New York and they were friends. So no I don't think so.

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Doesn't really matter what people think about the killing, only question is - did Frankenheimer intend to raise a discussion on this action?

"You couldn't be much further from the truth" - several

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