MovieChat Forums > Hands of the Ripper (1972) Discussion > Why does Pritchard dislike his future da...

Why does Pritchard dislike his future daughter-in-law?


In the movie, Pritchard seems to dislike his soon-to-be daughter-in-law. Is it because she's blind, and he's embarrassed by her?

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I don't think he really dislikes her, but he's too preoccupied with Anna at the time his son comes home with Laura. He does seem to be a little bit intimidated by her being blind, but no one can really dislike her...she's the friendliest woman ever

Gee they're good at playing dead, aren't they?

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I guess I thought he disliked her b/c at the beginning of the movie, when Pritchard & his son leave the seance, his son mentions he's going to a bachelor's party. Pritchard says something like "how these things (the impending wedding) slip up on you" and the son replies (a little on the angry/put out side) "I wouldn't have put it like that."

Also, when she is in the house for the first time feeling around the house, the look on Pritchard's face looks like he's thinking "Oh no, she's here."

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I wonder if its because she is blind and therefore breaking things?

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I think it's more to do with his late wife.

He does a "Vertigo" on Anna (he gives her his late wife's room, dresses her in her clothes and tries to 'fix' her because he couldn't 'fix' his wife, notice how he almost kisses Anna dressed in his wife's clothes after a wedding rehearsal in a graveyard while she talks about continuance after death).

His son has already chosen a 'damaged' bride and not only can she not fulfill his guilt repairing fantasy role (because she is his son's fiancé and her 'flaw' is beyond his expertise) he worries his son will suffer the same fate as himself and the situation fills him with unexpressed anxiety.

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Good points, that's it.
This movie is set in Edwardian period (1901-1910) and I was quite surprised to see that they had had wedding rehearsals at the time.

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No I don't think it was anything like that. He is the archetypal "eccentric scientist" type of Horror/Sci-Fi movies, with little time for anything or anyone not connected to his work.

Ralph Bates' Dr Jekyll was a similar Hammer character in Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde.

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I also got the feeling he didn't like her.

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As a Disabled person myself , it pleased me to see a blind person portrayed in a positive manner,as an independent and confident person in a movie that was made in the 1970's.


Gordon P. Clarkson

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