The waitress was right!


she was only following the policy of the diner. Why is she made out to be a villain?

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She was perpetuating the tyranny of the institutional power structure.

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I always think of this scene whenever I encounter petty tyrants. Often, they're people in low-status jobs who seem to have a militant glee when enforcing ridiculous rules/policies. Could be because it's the only time they really get to exercise power or could be because they're just jerks. I worked plenty of service jobs in my life and always tried to find a way to accommodate reasonable requests. It just makes life easier for everyone.

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What the other fella said.

But as Bobby Dupea remarks once they're all back inside the car, he didn't get what he wanted in the end...

I like that he somehow gets his small revenge against the "establishment" in Hal Ashby's 'The Last Detail' three years later, in the scene were Nicholson, Young and Quaid are in a diner and Quaid's character orders a cheeseburger which arrives with the cheese not grilled as he asked. Quaid being an introvert he doesn't dare send it back, but Nicholson does, gets one with the cheese grilled exactly right and tells Quaid: "See, Meadows? It's just as easy to have it the way you want it."

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She was being rude. And, its a ridiculous policy. I have never heard of a diner that did not serve toast. His request was very reasonable.

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i agree with the "no substitutions" rule but:

WTF kind of a cheap looking 70's diner makes that rule? doesn't 90% of their business revolve around toast?
imagine if Jules Winnfield ordered his muffin and the waitress was like "sawry sir.. muffins only come with a full breakfast.."

garçon would've been history.

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