plot question please


So Bathsheba tells her maid that she is in love with Frank. And she is worried about Frank's reputation. Then Bath and the Maid agree on something like "Frank must never come back here."
Why is that? If she loved him, why doesn't she want him back??

Next scene, Bath meets Frank on the beach. I assumed she was going to tell him to stay away, but they got married instead??

And finally, I understand that Boldwood wants to pay Frank to go away and marry Fanny. But why does Boldwood change his payment and say that Frank still gets the money if he marries Bath?? Boldwood wants Bath for himself...so why would he pay another man to marry her??

thanks

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Bathsheba's love affair with Frank, although in its infancy, could easily have lead to rumours being spread around the town of Weatherbury, thereby threatening her livelihood within the community. In addition to this, Boldwood has become enraged with jealousy and Bathsheba fears he will turn violent towards Frank, should the inevitable confrontation occur. So despite being in love with him, or perhaps to protect him, Bathsheba sadly laments to Liddy that Frank must be given no encouragement in coming to Weatherbury. (In the novel she even goes so far as inhabiting a distant town to discourage his presence)

The film may well have depicted their timeline with added fluency because, as you have pointed out, Bathsheba appears to have jumped from one resolution to another almost on a whim. This does make the clandestine meeting on the beach seem a little abrupt, but perhaps this was intentional and only momentarily misleading; all in preparation of Frank's bombshell to Boldwood which is to follow.

As for Boldwood's resort to bribery: it was a desperate measure; unmanly and dishonourable, and most unbecoming of the otherwise noble squire. Rejected, he pleads with Frank to take the money regardless of his intentions towards Bathsheba, in the forlorn hope that he can somehow yet be inveigled to his immoral and corruptive scheme. Boldwood's unenviable and unnecessary humiliation becomes all the more exacerbated, and to him unbearable, when he realizes Bathsheba & Frank are by now already Man & Wife.

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Thank you Neverj. That was very informative.

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Rejected, he pleads with Frank to take the money regardless of his intentions towards Bathsheba, in the forlorn hope that he can somehow yet be inveigled to his immoral and corruptive scheme.
No. His switch to "bribing" Troy to marry Bathsheba was motivated by Victorian propriety. He assumed that they were about to be intimate (or already had been), and did not want Bathsheba to be ruined by Troy's failure to marry her, as had happened with Fanny Robin.

His love for Bathsheba was protective, even proprietorial, rather than physical, as is shown by his words and actions throughout.

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I saw this movie when it first came out and then I watched it tonight many years later.

Batheseba didn't mean that she never wanted Frank back. She met him on the beach with a subconsciously NEED to be swept off her feet by him.

When Boldwood realized that Frank couldn't be bought by one bribe which would benefit him, he offered another one which would protect Bath. Bath was out there waiting for this cad. He thought she would ruin herself. This was a misguided attempt at having some control over the situation.

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There is a later scene where one of the workers sees the coins lying in the mud but ignores them. I found that unbelievable, unless he was planning to sneak back at night. Fifty pounds was two year's wages in the 1860s.

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