MovieChat Forums > Do Not Adjust Your Set Discussion > Where are the other episodes??????

Where are the other episodes??????


I have some bootleg VHS copies of this show. Like many, I looked to this dvd release as the COMPLETE issue of all DNAYS episodes. I bought it the very day it was released.

Why - oh why? - do I have two episodes on VHS that aren't on this dvd? They are obviously recorded from British tv, I can't tell which channel, but I see what looks like TV interference on the tape. That means that these are shows that are in good enough condition to actually be rerun on tv! Why aren't they on the dvd?

One show is a Christmas episode with a very racy joke (Eric holds up a pair of panties and says: "You might be wondering what these have to do with Christmas. Well, they're Carol's.") and a GREAT Gilliam animation. The other episode features Bunny May (also seen on Rutland Weekend Television) and a terrific Jones/Palin sketch about being annoying on an airplane.

WHERE ARE THESE SHOWS????

The packaging on this dvd goes on about "animations by Terry Gilliam", but none are actually featured on the dvd! What gives?

I tried writing to the manufacturer, but they were no help. :(


"We may be stupid, but we're not clever!"

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THOSE ARE LOST!!!! LOST FOR EVER!! UNTILLL someone finds 'em.....

the annoying fish.

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But they have been broadcast, that is my point. The VHS tapes I have are from '80s British television, proving that the shows haven't been wiped or completely "lost". They do exist and are in the hands of at least one British broadcaster (I can't remember if it's ITV or what, the tapes I have aren't from the BBC - maybe that's the issue? I don't know much about how the Brit TV industry is structured, legally. The tapes are from somethin called "UK Gold", whatever that is.).

I mean, notice that the packaging on this dvd rants about "animations by Terry Gilliam" and yet there aren't ANY on this dvd! So someone knew that they're out there, and apparently planned to include them. The episodes I have on VHS show at least two great early Gilliam shorts.

If anyone has heard ANYthing, please please please post...thank you....

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It might be worth getting in touch with ITV to refer you to their archive department. It may well be that you possess something that isn't in the archives and is need of return! If they're not the right channel I'm sure they can refer you to them.

"Oh, I did my thesis on life experience." - Anonymous Harvard Guy, The Simpsons.

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Check the other thread. Two additional episodes survive, but they weren't produced by Diffusion, so they're not on the DVD. One of the Christmas special, and one is from Series 2 and includes the Gilliam animations. Beyond that, the rest is silence, sadly.

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Perhaps they compiled some material for two shows in the eighties and then let the other stuff perish. Sad but hopefully not true.

The Apple Scruffs Corps, 05
Children, don't do what I have done

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their lost... like At Last The 1948 Show!

there are so many episode's lost of At Last The 1948 Show... very sad!

Do Not Adjust Your Set is also brilliant! to bad there also episode's lost of this series!

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Some extra material was seen in the documentary 30 Years of Monty Python, those included the Gilliam animations.

The Apple Scruffs Corps, 05
Wasn't Humph Bogey wond?

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"Perhaps they compiled some material for two shows in the eighties and then let the other stuff perish. Sad but hopefully not true. "

Nope, honestly, I have VHS tapes of 2 FULL episodes that aren't on the dvd. They exist. They are somewhere....


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* "We may be stupid, but we're not clever!" *

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Try here. I just got DNAYS (same 9 eps). This page has it & At Last the 1948 Show.

http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=6863946&style=movie

Carpe Noctem!

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According to the wikipedia entry for Rediffusion & Associated Redfiffusion http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Associated-Rediffusion , most of the rights of the surviving episodes are either with the British Film Institute National Archives
http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/search.php?needle=Do+Not+Adjust+Your+Set&category=Titles&searchField=title

or with a company called Archbuild Limited who hold the rights to the compilations from which the DVD was made. The same applies to the companion series "At Last the 1948 Show".

I am located in Australia and we have had an identical problem with the archiving of locally produced television programmes. Because of the high cost of production of TV programmes, video tape recording as opposed to film recoding was seen as a blessing in disguise back then. It was seen as cost effective to re-record over a used video tape and I doubt whether anybody gave any thought to actual archiving of recorded material, particularly with ever-changing technologies.

We have seen over the last couple of years many compilation programmes celebrating the first 50 years of Australian television. Much of the archived material used was from film stock recorded in the 50's to very early 60's and therefore pre video tape recording. It is easier to get access to archived 1940's war-time news-reels than 60's and 70's TV programmes.

Ironically, it is also easier to get American television programmes from the 60's because so much of it was sold cheaply around the world that they never really stopped televising them. Australian television broadcasters repeated them ad-nauseum and continue to be seen to this day either on Pay-TV or on DVD releases. "F Troop", "McHale's Navy", "Bewitched", "I Dream of Jeannie" to name but a few. To get your hands on British (or Australian TV) programmes from this era is nigh impossible.

In a parallel situaltion, I am involved in radio broadcasting. We have a collection of old equipment in a store room that are museum pieces now. Reel-to-reel tape decks, D-Carts and 8-track cartidges, turntables, cassette decks, CDs and Mini-discs. Most of it is in working order, but nearly impossible to repair now because of the scarcity of parts. Over the years we have been archiving from one technology to the next and currently using MP3 recorders to record interviews in the field and accessing and creating programmes from a computer based database catalogue of our music collection. I suppose we have only appreciated the real value of archives in the last 20 years of our 30 years of broadcasting. No doubt today's iPod is tomorrow's museum piece, but the recoding will be archived to the next available medium.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, it really is a shame we didn't have it 40 years ago.

Cheers and beers,

et tu Brute



Locked my wire coat-hanger in the car - good thing that I always carry spare keys in my pocket :)

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