Why this title?


Why does IMDB list "Chimes at Midnight" as "Campanadas a medianoche" -- actually, when I saw it in a university area theater in Honolulu in 1967 or so, it was called "Falstaff". Either that or Chimes at Midnight would make sense for an english language movie, so why the Italian title?

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Because the film was made in Spain, with Spanish funding and a Spanish crew. It was originally released in Spain. So, like many other foreign films, the IMDB lists its original title for its main listing. Falstaff was the american title when it was release over here in 67.

Look at Crouching Tiger.... We know it as Crouching Tiger, but since it was a Chinees movie and originally released in China, the IMDB lists it under it original Chineese name.

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thats not true, The Others was a spanish movie and IMDB uses its English Title

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Well, the Others is not exactly Spanish, was made by a bunch of producers, and was made recently, what makes more easy to say that the producers chose an English name for the title of the film. Falstaff was made in 1965 when English was not yet the international language as it's today, so the producers were probably not concerned with the title being presented first in Spanish.

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It'a a line from the Movie, when falstaff talks to his young friend prince Hal about their friendship "but we have heard the chimes at midnight..." talking about all the fun times they stayed out carousing and drinking.

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[deleted]

Ironically enough, in the original text of Henry IV, Part 2, Falstaff isn't talking to Hal. It's been changed by WElles and Branagh so that Falstaff says this to Hal so there's more tragedy in Hal's banishment of Falstaff (a choice I support, by the way), but originally it was said to Falstaff's aging friend Justice Shallow. However, there is a degree of tragedy and sadness around this as well: Shallow and his ancient kinsman Silence represent the rural happiness and content with life that Falstaff can never really have, and when Falstaff tells him, "We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow" it becomes nostalgic and almost tragic to think at what all this man's been through and enjoyed.

Sorry if this sounded preachy. Falstaff is very near and dear to my heart; I played him this past summer in Part 2.

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This thread is a bit confusing, I've just seen the film and Falstaff says the chimes at midnight line to Master Shallow. Why are you all talking like it was said to Harry?

my ymdb page: http://www.shompy.com/steppenwolf/l42849_ukuk.html

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>This thread is a bit confusing, I've just seen the film and Falstaff says the >chimes at midnight line to Master Shallow. Why are you all talking like it was >said to Harry?

You're right, sir. Falstaff says the line to Shallow in the play and "Chimes at Midnight". In Branagh's "Henry V", the flashback sequence has Falstaff say the line to Hal.

Am I less of a man if I admit that reading/seeing any of the above makes me tear up a bit?

"Jesus, the days that we have seen."

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[deleted]

"...so why the Italian title?"

The title is not in Italian, but in Spanish.

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Italian?! It's spanish!

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the title is NOT chimes at midnight, it's FALSTAFF.

on the credits to the movie, it says FALSTAFF (CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT)

and as we all know, what's in parentheses is not really there

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Even if the film's' original title was "Falstaff," I think that "Chimes at Midnight" is one of the coolest movie titles of all time. It makes a person more curious to see the film than "Falstaff." Just my opinion though.

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this movie is great
the title is made from one of the first things said in the film (I don't know if it's written by Shakespeare or Welles)
'we have heard the chimes at midnight'
this is the kind of cinema I adore
the rest of the movie I dislike
but the first minute is heaven

'say thy well'

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the title is NOT chimes at midnight, it's FALSTAFF.

on the credits to the movie, it says FALSTAFF (CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT)


Yeah, I have a copy made from a videotape and that's exactly what the on-screen title card reads in that version.

The only thing is, though, for so many years I've read about this film and it's almost ALWAYS referred to just as "Chimes At Midnight", so it makes me wonder if perhaps the "Falstaff" part of the title was added to English language prints against Welles' wishes?

If, as others have mentioned above, the film first played in Europe, and the title cards for those countries only said (in native languager per country) "Chimes At Midnight", I suppose then that that would be the definitive title for the film.

Extremely confusing!



and as we all know, what's in parentheses is not really there



Glad you took the Cinnamon Challenge...now try the Arsenic Challenge!

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the title is NOT chimes at midnight, it's FALSTAFF.

Well it aired this morning on TCM and the title was 'The Chimes at Midnight'.


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