Colorization (?)


I have loved this film since I first viewed it on local TV in about 1970. Now, having seen it restored and in wide screen format, I'm nearly fulfilled, except for it being in black and white.

Some films are completely suited for B&W, but I can't help thinking that LATB might be enhanced by an excellent colorization. The Southwest is, of course, "colorful" in its own right, and LATB's location shooting, so much of it in broad daylight with mountains, desert, forest, trickling streams, a beautiful horse, dappled trails, and of course the wonderful dawn shot of the mountains in the background when Jack and Gerry part ways ... all could be enhanced by careful, detailed, respectful colorization.

I am not one to run around calling for mass colorization. I feel that only a very _few_ films should be colorized.

But, let's face it. For being a "small" film, LATB is a kind of epic. Its masterful photography, big screen glory, location shooting, wide open spaces, even its pine trees CRY OUT for colorizing. I don't know what time of year it was filmed, but how much more might colorizing enhance the film had it been filmed in the Fall - think of how lovely some just-turning aspens would look in contrast with the solemnity of those dark pines ...
Be that as it may, I really do think that this movie is one of the very few that would be boosted by a competent colorization.

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Colorization is an aberration. While I would have preferred to see this in color, it was an artistic decision to film it in B&W to correlate with the film's stark subject matter.

Adding color to a product that didn't have it orginally makes absolutely no sense. How do you marvel at natural landscapes that are falsely rendered?

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How do you marvel at natural landscapes that are falsely rendered?
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It's B+W itself that falsely renders a colored landscape.

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So substituting color that wasn't originally there somehow adds verisimilitude?

http://jmoneyyourhoney.filmaf.com/owned

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Of course the color was originally there - in the photographed landscapes and interiors. Black and white filming decolorized it.

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Your point is an excellent one, Bastasch8647. Filming in black and white was almost always done for financial considerations, not artistic ones. But that is heresy on these boards, as you can clearly see from the slew of pretentious, condescending comments expressing breathless horror at even the thought of filming in subtle, natural color.

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Thanks, movies789. Of course, I am not insisting on colorization, but as I said I'm curious as to the effect of excellent colorization on the outdoor scenes especially.

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Why not get out the crayons yourself? You obviously still use 'em.

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Why not make an intellectual, educated case for anti-colorization? Your post obviously needs it.

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"I feel that only a very _few_films should be colorized." .

I agree with you .

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Colorization was developed so that US media companies could empty their vaults of black and white material on to unsuspecting countries which refused to show anything black and white.
It is an abomination, devoid of any artistic merit whatsoever.

"Say it with flowers . . . give her a Triffid."

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It is an abomination, devoid of any artistic merit whatsoever.

Just another subjective gripe with no educational or intellectual backup. Just prejudice.

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Please tell me that you have no plans of procreating.

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Colorization belongs only in hell.

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