F100 crash


Hi,
Interesting movie for the opportunity to get so close to X-15 operation especially considering that X-15 story was only partly written (it finished in 1968). For example the engine ground test preparation really looks like a real one, and engine explosion seen is the one that actually occured in june 1960 (and the wreck shown at points is the real one).
The F100 crash footage at the end of the movie can be seen in a "6 million dollar man" or a "the bionic woman" (i can't remember) TV episode.
Does anybody know about this accident, and what provoked it (if it's a real one)?
Have a nice day

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Not an F100

This is directly from NASA DRYDEN website

On May 10, 1967, during the 16th glide flight, a landing accident severely damaged the vehicle and seriously injured the NASA pilot, Bruce Peterson. (Film footage of the crash was later used in the opening sequence of the popular 1970s-era television show, "The Six-million Dollar Man.")

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/news/FactSheets/FS-011-DFRC.html

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Thank you for answer, yes i remember of a lifting body crashing in "The Six-million Dollar Man" opening sequence, and really i thought the pilot couldn't have survived. But this sequence doesn't appear in this movie.

My question is about this "chase 1" F100 crashing at the end of the movie , while stalling close to ground, with full thrust and landing gear down, with camera much closer than it is with the lifting body.
It doesn't appear in "The Six-million Dollar Man" opening sequence, but after research is displayed as Steve Austin's son crash in "The Return of the Six-Million-Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman" (87) TV movie.

Another amazing thing is to see the B-52 taking off and landing with no flaps at all...
Anyway thank you again for interesting link.

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My father was a test pilot at Edwards from 1954 - 1964. He was unfortunately lost in 1965 while chief test pilot for a German company, HFB, flying the Hansa 320.

Story as I recall was that the F-100 crash was part of a multi ship takeoff. On rotation the F-100 we see caught a blast from the bird in front of it which pitched it up into a critical and unrecoverable stall.

Bear in mind this was long ago and I was pretty young so....

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Thank you for answer, really i found no trace of it anywhere in internet. So it actually took place in Edwards...
I read a similar story about a german F-104 lost in a patrol take-off, because of wing tip vortex caused by wingman. The pilot successfully ejected.

Sorry for your father loss, I read the story of Hansa 320. The price paid by test pilots and their families is so high...

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Info on the F-100 crash:

http://www.alexisparkinn.com/the_sabre_dance.htm

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Real good site! Thank you! I had heard a lot about this when I was active duty in the USAF in the early 1980s but never could find the details until I went to the site you specified.

Heck of a dance. Pilot never had a chance; even with the ejection seats of today his survival would be "iffy" at best. The movie incorporated the footage as a way to get write off one of the characters.

Looking back at this movie one can argueably state that it was not very good (chartacter developmen, plot, etc.); however, it did have one quality in abundance that made up for the other perceived deficiencies-a great deal of it was actually real!! No acting! It showed the real thing!!

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Didn't look at the link, but the footage you refer to is a famous piece of celluloid, especially to those interested in aircraft, and/or military hardware.
One has to realize that, at the time, jet engine development wasn't nearly what it is these days.
For an engine to make even 10,000 lbs. thrust was a remarkable feat at that time.
The problem with jets, in general, until the early 1970's, is that the engine(s) max/total thrust didn't equal the weight of the aircraft.
When this condition exists, the plane will stall out when positioned at an extreme attitude, such as you see in the famous footage.
If the F-100 had been developed as a twin engine aircraft, the "Sabre Dance" would've never existed.


Tell me, you love your country?
Well, I've just died for it.

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The footage in question dates from the mid-1950s, and has nothing to do with formations, vortices, the "Saber dance," or even the well documented and sometimes fatal instability of the early "small-tail" Huns. Although the footage has appeared in numerous movies and TV shows, to my knowledge it was first used (inappropriately) in the 1958 Robert Wagner-Robert Mitchum F-86 epic, "The Hunters." So obviously it was shot before 1958. The clip was employed--with the all too common Hollywood splice job that changes aircraft types instantly--to represent the control lock-up and fatal crash of the battle-damaged F-86 of Major Corona, the wingman who could not drop tanks and whom Robert Wagner abandoned to pursue a MiG. In fact, the F-100 in the footage was not OEM, but a Hun specially modified for a rocket-assisted zero-launch experiment (very similar to earlier truckbed-launch tests with straight-wing F-84s). The crash was attributed to altered CG, caused by the presence of the still attached rocket booster hardware. (I think it was supposed to be jettisoned, but could not be detached.) In fact, at the beginning of the full clip as used in "The Hunters," the rocket booster is still visible under the rear fuselage. Despite this glaring error, I still highly recommend "The Hunters," which has spectacular air-to-air color photography (not to mention the classic Mitchum line about Russian cigarettes that "taste like Stalin's socks"), and is based on a book by a Korean War F-86 pilot. Its "MiG-15" stand-ins are F-84Fs out of Luke, at least correctly painted PLAAF sky blue. If memory serves, a lot of the movie's air-to-air F-86 "combat" was flown by "Boots" Blesse, one of the top F-86 aces in Korea.

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Well the op did describe the scene thusly...

blacksab73 wrote:

My question is about this "chase 1" F100 crashing at the end of the movie , while stalling close to ground, with full thrust and landing gear down

Seems to be describing this famous piece of file footage, which has been featured in various movies / tv shows over the years...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZL0x-gEDM8

Tell me, you love your country?
Well, I've just died for it.

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It was a lifting body test flight that was a preparation for the X-15 program.

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When was the F-100 ever used in a lifting body test?

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The crash in question, was the Dyna-Soar, a lifting body plane that preceded the SST and XB 70. As far as I remember it did not precede the X-15 nor was it any part of X-15 development.
I was a kid at Edwards during this period, from about 1952 to 1961.
My dad worked on the X-15, the B52 Conversion of the wing mount, and later on the B-58, all as ground crew, and development.
Pretty cool to be a kid at Edwards.

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