Real life Psycho.


I only post this because this guy had DID and used a knife in his killings. They were extremely brutal, as well. He killed Ashton Kutcher's date and became infamous as the Hollywood Ripper.

"A man dubbed the “Hollywood Ripper” was found guilty Thursday of the murders of two women, including a student who was due to go out with actor Ashton Kutcher the night of her death.

Michael Gargiulo, 43, was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder by a Los Angeles jury who deliberated for four days before reaching their verdict.

Prosecutor Dan Akemon had told jurors that Gargiulo targeted the women in “frenzied knife attacks,” referring to him as a “stone-cold serial killer who preys on women.”

Gargiulo’s lawyers said he denied the killings.

They said there was no evidence Gargiulo was at the scene of the two murders, and indicated that his dissociative identity disorder could have caused him to go into a “fugue” state during a separate attack on a third woman who survived."

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"He is also awaiting a separate trial for the earlier 1993 killing of a third woman in the state of Illinois.

Prosecutor Akemon said Gargiulo targeted women who lived near him and waited for the perfect opportunity to attack them at night in or near their homes in “totally planned killings.”

The murdered women had injuries to their breasts, and one was found nearly decapitated, he said."

https://www.breitbart.com/news/hollywood-ripper-found-guilty-of-two-murders-including-kutcher-date/

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_yTbpZhtuZWY/Sa9htYN3rQI/AAAAAAAAJsU/JftaT0xToLs/s400/ashley-ellerin.jpg

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Grisly and gruesome...and a reminder that "Psycho," despite being seen as "the sickest movie ever made" by one critic in 1960...was really a rather cinematic and stylized version of psychopathic knife murder. The old house, the creepy motel, the charmng and handsome movie star playing the psycho, the fast cut stylization of BOTH murders...."Psycho" showed how to make unappetizing real life murder play as something Gothic and dreamlike.

Pretty tough for Ashton Kutcher. He thought his date was standing him up.

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bump

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Certainly, Hitchcock wasn't a stranger to these things. I think he became more grisly and gruesome in his later career based on his filmography, but not certain how he changed. Maybe he found murder more lucrative. Maybe he found it fulfilling in some sort of macabre way. He blew up an innocent child in Sabotage. I don't know enough about him to tell. Oh yeah, part of the attraction for casting Anthony Perkins was that he was handsome and also not manly, i.e. he could get away being in a dress and not be laughed at or ridiculed. I'm sure Hitch would've found the Hollywood Ripper case to be a subject of a movie. He could do the motivation as totally different.

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Certainly, Hitchcock wasn't a stranger to these things. I think he became more grisly and gruesome in his later career based on his filmography, but not certain how he changed. Maybe he found murder more lucrative. Maybe he found it fulfilling in some sort of macabre way.

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Hard to say. Its very weird in retrospect. The two murders in "Psycho" were considered horrifying, bloody and beyond the pale.

And yet subsequent murders in Torn Curtain and Frenzy were considered WORSE. Mainly because they had no music, and had no "boo" factor.

That said, I'd say the two Psycho murders, the man with the pecked out eyes in The Birds, the final Marnie murder, the Torn Curtain murder(Gromek), the after-the-fact ugliness of torture and killings in Topaz, and the Frenzy rape-murder(of a defenseless woman) ...indicate that Hitchcock certainly went for brutal murder in his last decade.

Until the rather light and murder-free Family Plot. Which nonetheless had the villain slap and manhandle the heroine with disturbing ferocity.

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He blew up an innocent child in Sabotage.

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Well, he always claimed he should not have done that. Meanwhile, I'd say that such forties and fifties films as Lifeboat, Spellbound, Rope, Strangers on a Train, Dial M for Murder, and Man Who Knew Too Much '56 had murders and accidental deaths that were very violent for their time. Maybe it WASN'T a late career thing for Hitch..

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I don't know enough about him to tell.

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Me neither. I will say this: BOTH Hitchcock AND Steven Spielberg seemed to get deep into violence in their later years. Rich directors sick of "fun" violence?

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Oh yeah, part of the attraction for casting Anthony Perkins was that he was handsome and also not manly, i.e. he could get away being in a dress and not be laughed at or ridiculed.

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An interesting idea. Burt Lancaster in that dress...laughs? (Though Burt DID dress up like an old lady in The List of Adrian Messnger. But he wore a fake old woman face.)

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I'm sure Hitch would've found the Hollywood Ripper case to be a subject of a movie. He could do the motivation as totally different.

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Well, a LOT of real-life psychos fed his movie psychos. I think that Uncle Charlie in Shadow of Doubt and Lars Thorwald in Rear Window were based on real killers. Norman Bates was famously based on Ed Gein(but nobody in 1960 would have gone to see a movie ABOUT ugly old Ed Gein and his sickening crimes.) And Bob Rusk(Frenzy) was based on elements of SEVERAL psychos, including(you could look them up) Neville Heath, John Christie(played by Richard Attenborough in 11 Rillington Place, or was it 10 Rillington Place?) and somebody called "Jack the Stripper."

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"Pretty tough for Ashton Kutcher. He thought his date was standing him up."

I'd say it was worse for the woman who died.

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Point taken!

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