Those classic locations


Can current residents tell us how many of those locations are still standing?






Don't touch that!
Why Not?
It does very bad things...

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Sutros Baths burned down in 1966. If you ever go to the Cliff House be sure to visit the ruins:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutro_Baths

The Embarcadero Freeway was damaged in the 1989 earthquake and subsequently torn down:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embarcadero_Freeway

As far as I know the other locations listed at IMDB still exist.

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Was wondering which freeway that was. You don't see movie scenes on under construction freeways anymore, especially that far off the ground.

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Was the ice rink part of the bathhouse? It's a shame unique places like that aren't built anymore.

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The ice rink was had been built over one of the pools in the bathhouse in the 1930s. By the 1950s the pools had been closed and walled off and allowed to fall into decay so only the ice rink and museum exhibits were still part of the Baths until it closed in 1966 and then burned down.


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I thought the freeway was over in Oakland - around the Cypress Viaduct. You can see one of the buildings there with the sign "Pacific Pipe Company", which now has the address of 2000 Mandela Parkway where the viaduct once stood.

It was cool to see the Cow Palace in Daly City in the background during the meeting at the motel - which used to be a Travelodge, and is still there.

Also neat to see a Victory ship pulling out of its berth.

Lefty's apartment buidling on Kent St. is still there as is the mansion with the rounded corners on Jackson St. where Dancer gets the cutlery.

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The San Francisco customhouse on Battery Street still stands (it's the second customhouse on the same site, and opened for business on May 1, 1911) and the Collector's office looks much as it did in 1958. "Chet McPhee" was actually Collector of Customs in San Francisco (and something of a mover and shaker in local Republican politics) when the film was made, although he's portrayed by an actor.

Like most federal buildings these latter years, it's a chore to get into--metal detectors, x-rays, background investigation, urinalysis and a letter from your mother are among the requirements--but if you can talk your way in, and ask nicely, they'll send someone down to give you a half-hour tour of the old thing.

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the other thing I like about these old films is seeing vintage planes in flight such as the United DC-7 ( before Eli Wallach's first scene) They are a rare sight now, but there's a few still around as freighters & air tankers, plus one unmolested passenger craft now undergoing restoration (flew out of Minneapolis about 5 years ago) & hopefully to hit the air show circuit later on.

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There was also a blimp floating in air in the background in one of the scenes and all those neat old cars too.

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Speaking of the neat old cars, if anyone wants to know what they are, the Internet Movie Car Database is a terrific resource. This film's page there:

http://imcdb.org/movie.php?id=51866

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