MovieChat Forums > The Catered Affair (1956) Discussion > Father of the Bride vs. A Catered Affair...

Father of the Bride vs. A Catered Affair.


Father of the Bride, both versions, make it fun to laugh along with upper class people.

A Catered Affair was just sad.

You can see why throughout history most of our protagonists are well off.

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I get a kick out of given Liz and Debbie's personal history and their respective movies about weddings: Elizabeth Taylor gets the deluxe wedding with the beautiful gown, successful dad, nice, beautiful mom, upperclass home, maid, etc....

Poor Debbie gets the quickie wedding in street clothes; struggling working class parents, old before their time; no gifts, shabby apartment; etc...


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Get me a bromide - and put some gin in it!

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Not to mention in real life Liz had plenty of practice, including a wedding with
debbie's -ex.

"It's the system, Lara. People will be different after the Revolution."

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Father of the Bride, both versions, make it fun to laugh along with upper class people.

A Catered Affair was just sad.

You can see why throughout history most of our protagonists are well off.



I think you are right about the latter -- unless the characters' poverty is a focus of a film, a lot of screenwriters probably make them well-enough off, just so they can set things as they want, have characters travel, dress well, own things needed for the plot, etc.

I don't think The Catered Affair was just sad, though. Forgiveness and lack of selfishness were triumphant in the end.

They are fun to compare and contrast, though. Obviously, one film is meant as a comedy, the other as a drama, so the differences make sense (and I know you know that -- just making sure you realize that I do, as well!).

To make one wryly funny and the other more dramatic, I see three big differences besides finances. The characters in FOTB are very verbal, generally confident, and they usually listen to one another.

TCA's characters are not good at expressing themselves in words, not sure of themselves, and draw their own conclusions (or default to their own packed-down resentments) rather than really listening.

So, when the bride in FOTB is upset, another character is likely to go right into sympathetic mode. They seem to live their lives thinking "whatever happens, we'll have each other and survive."

When the bride in TCA is upset, another character is likely to throw their own misery and needs in her face. They tend to be in "everything's a huge disaster and nobody cares about my needs" mode, until the end.

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